Our Oceans, Our Future: Fisheries and Climate Change.

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“Our oceans, our future” was the slogan of the UN Oceans Conference held in New York in June 2017, which focused on how to sustainably manage our ocean’s marine resources. Recently published research, however, suggests something a bit different. This global analysis shows that least developed countries and Small Island developing states are among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts on fisheries. Having contributed relatively little to the problem of climate change, they may be left wondering: ‘their oceans, our future?’   This week, in newly published research, authors construct a vulnerability index for 147 countries building on the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which assesses vulnerability as a function of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity (see Figure 1). The resulting index is based on the most recent socio-economic data, as well as future projections of climate change impacts using a variety of different scenarios and timeframes.

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Our Oceans, Our Future: Fisheries and Climate Change.