Turn left, then right: political changes in Latin America and their impact on health systems

The following two tabs change content below.
International Health Policies
International health policies (IHP) blog is an initiative of the ‘Health Policy unit’ at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium (ITM), and fits in the wider project of “Strategic Network on International Health Policies.” It is in line with the ITM objective of “Switching the Poles,” aiming to increase the influence of the Global South on the global health debate.

As you might have noticed, Latin America is going through a period of important political changes and turmoil. As the political pendulum is swinging back, more and more conservative (or downright neoliberal) governments are replacing the democratic, progressive ones that were prevailing in previous years. These changes have a number of causes, among others the fact that many voters have perhaps grown a bit tired of these progressive governments after some years in power (as is the case in all democracies with incumbents), the lack of effectiveness of their administration, as well as a perception of (too much) political patronage, bureaucracy and corruption. Importantly, however, a structured strategy from right-wing politicians and parties to remove progressive governments from power (and ditch their policies) also played a key role, via so-called parliamentary coups d’état, ultimately ‘soft’ versions of the ones that have taken place in previous decades in the region. This strategy has been put into action since June 2009, when the Honduran Congress resolved the destitution of President Manuel Zelaya, considering that his government’s actions were violating the Constitution and the judiciary order of the Central American country.

Source:  

Turn left, then right: political changes in Latin America and their impact on health systems