Author Archives: PLoS Medicine Blog

Push for Better Death Data Bears Fruit: Largest Ever Global Dataset of Individual Deaths…

Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark comments on the INDEPTH Network’s release of the largest ever dataset of individual deaths in Africa and Southeast Asia, and the importance of equality in health data. Enthusiasts of global health research will have observed various battles … Continue reading »The post Push for Better Death Data Bears Fruit: Largest Ever Global Dataset of Individual Deaths Released appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Does Exposure to Smoking (either passive or active) Lead to Increased Allergies?

Charles Ebikeme interviews Dr. Bahi Takkouche of the University of Santiago de Compostela and reviews his research on smoking and allergies, which was published earlier this year in PLOS Medicine. Dr. Takkouche’s paper is included in the PLOS Clinical Immunology Collection, which … Continue reading »The post Does Exposure to Smoking (either passive or active) Lead to Increased Allergies? appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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An Interview with Pascale Cossart

Charles Ebikeme interviews Pascale Cossart of the Institut Pasteur on the occasion of her receipt of the Women in Science Award at FEBS-EMBO 2014. On September 2, Pascale Cossart received the Women in Science Award at the Federation of European … Continue reading »The post An Interview with Pascale Cossart appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Pneumonia Affects People of All Ages: Interview with Carlos J. Orihuela

For World Pneumonia Day 2014, PLOS Pathogens interviews Associate Editor, author, and researcher Carlos J. Orihuela on his recent publication in PLOS Pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae Translocates into the Myocardium and Forms Unique Microlesions That Disrupt Cardiac Function, describing how the disease can lead to heart … Continue reading »The post Pneumonia Affects People of All Ages: Interview with Carlos J. Orihuela appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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What Factors Might Have Led to the Emergence of Ebola in West Africa?

Cynthia GoldsmithThis colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. See PHIL 1832 for a black and white version of this image.Where is Ebola virus found in nature?The exact origin, locations, and natural habitat (known as the "natural reservoir") of Ebola virus remain unknown. However, on the basis of available evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is zoonotic (animal-borne) and is normally maintained in an animal host that is native to the African continent. A similar host is probably associated with Ebola-Reston which was isolated from infected cynomolgous monkeys that were imported to the United States and Italy from the Philippines. The virus is not known to be native to other continents, such as North America.

Alexander et al, PLOS NTD | “An Ebola outbreak of unprecedented scope emerged in West Africa in December 2013 and presently continues unabated in the countries Read More

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What Factors Might Have Led to the Emergence of Ebola in West Africa?

This manuscript has been conditionally accepted by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases for publication prior to formal review. Following a successful outcome of independent peer review, a revised version will be formally published by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and a link to the final … Continue reading »The post What Factors Might Have Led to the Emergence of Ebola in West Africa? appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Mind the Deadly gaps

Grania Brigden (@TBBrigden) discusses the urgent need to close the gaps in the TB response. The 45th Union World Conference on Lung Health held in Barcelona last week opened with the Health Ministers of South Africa and India making bold … Continue reading »The post Mind the Deadly gaps appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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EMA’s Release of Regulatory Data: Possible Fall out for Journals and Research Synthesis

On 2 October the European Medicines Agency’s (EMA) published the final version of its policy on prospective release of clinical study reports (CSRs) of trials submitted by sponsors in support of Marketing Authorisation Applications (MAAs). I have summarized its content … Continue reading »The post EMA’s Release of Regulatory Data: Possible Fall out for Journals and Research Synthesis appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Social pathways for Ebola Virus Disease in rural Sierra Leone, and some implications for…

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This manuscript has been conditionally accepted by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases for publication prior to formal review. Following a successful outcome of independent peer review, a revised version will be formally published by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and a link to the final … Continue reading »The post Social pathways for Ebola Virus Disease in rural Sierra Leone, and some implications for containment appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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PLOS Offers Expedited Dissemination of Ebola Research

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The ability to rapidly disseminate the findings of primary research as well as informed scientific assessment and opinion is critical in the face of public health emergencies such as the present outbreak of the Ebola virus.  At PLOS, primary research … Continue reading »The post A Rapid Response to Ebola appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Researchers Follow the Path of HIV and Prevention Interventions

Charlene Dezzutti from the University of Pittsburgh and the Magee-Womens Research Institute explains how HIV researchers are incorporating biomarkers and preclinical testing – featured in the PLOS Collection Advances in HIV Mucosal Immunology: Challenges and Opportunities – in their pursuit of an … Continue reading »The post Researchers Follow the Path of HIV and Prevention Interventions appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Urbanisation Up Close

Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Undeniably the world is urbanising. By 2050, according to the UN, the world’s urban population will almost double from its 2007 size of 3.3 billion … Continue reading »The post Urbanisation Up Close appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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Ebola has Taught us a Crucial Lesson about our Views of “Irrational” Health Behaviors

Sara Gorman compares irrational reactions to the Ebola outbreak by Americans as well as those in Western Africa. As Ebola rears its ugly head in the U.S., there has been a lot of discussion about how afraid we really should … Continue reading »The post Ebola has Taught us a Crucial Lesson about our Views of “Irrational” Health Behaviors appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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The Price of Joining the ‘Middle Income Country’ Club: Reduced Access to Medical Innovation

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On November 5, 2014, the WHO, WIPO and WTO will hold a joint symposium to discuss innovation and access to medical technologies in middle-income countries. In this post, Judit Rius Sanjuan and Rohit Malpani of Médecins Sans Frontières discuss the barriers … Continue reading »The post The Price of Joining the ‘Middle Income Country’ Club: Reduced Access to Medical Innovation appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

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