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To Use or Not to Use: the Clinical Dilemma of Antimicrobials

    Understandably frustrated after 4 weeks of mild coughing, a nicely dressed businesswoman had come for an evaluation. I looked for infection in her Read More

Our favorite Hub Originals from 2016

In case you missed it, here’s a roundup of our favorite Hub Originals from 2016. The Global Health Hub publishes original pieces from writers engaged in global Read More

The God of empty spaces: Thoughts on religion and civil society in neoliberal Guatemala

The other day I visited Lydia, a 56-year-old Maya woman who lives with her family in the highlands of Guatemala and has for many years Read More

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NCDs: refocusing our efforts just in time

0000-0002-1767-4576On December 9-11, the second NCDA forum will take place in Sharjah, UAE. The theme of the conference is aptly Stepping up the pace on NCDs: making 2018 count, providing a unique opportunity to unite and mobilise NCD civil society ahead of the 2018 UN High-level Meeting on NCDs. For the wider health and non-health audience, this blog post provides an insight into the current state of NCDs, and the exciting road ahead. Taking stock  The global burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) represents a crisis largely of our collective creation and poses a multitude of risks to everyone, everywhere. NCDs are the leading cause of mortality worldwide, with three in four of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.


U.N. Report Highlights Environmental Dimension Of Antimicrobial Resistance

CIDRAP: U.N. report cites environmental threat of antimicrobial resistance “A report [Tuesday] from the United Nations Environment Programme (U.N. Environment) highlights the environmental dimension of antimicrobial resistance. The Frontiers Report, launched during the third U.N.


Wilson Center To Recognize 30th Anniversary Of Safe Motherhood Initiative

Woodrow Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program’s “New Security Beat”: The Single Best Intervention: Thirty Years of Safe Motherhood “…To help celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Safe Motherhood Initiative, Dot Mom asked leaders in the field to reflect on the most impactful intervention of last 30 years. Join us at the Wilson Center…More


Beyond the stereotype: the many faces of malnutrition in contemporary Tanzania

A starving, emaciated child: this is the image that usually comes to most people’s mind when they think of malnutrition in Africa. However, what is less portrayed is a far more common form of undernutrition with life-long consequences that is not immediately visible to the human eye, a so-called hidden hunger known as chronic malnutrition or stunting. Chronically malnourished children are usually not thinner than other children, and they do not look undernourished. But they are shorter than their peers and therefore referred to as stunted. Although genetic differences and environmental factors also cause differences in population height potential, in some communities, stunting is so common that it is hard to know what is ‘normal’ and what is not.


National, International Plans To Build Climate Change Resiliency Must Consider Vulnerabilities…

Thomson Reuters Foundation: Embracing uncertainty while planning for resilience Mozaharul Alam, Rohini Kohli, and Angus Mackay, climate change adaptation and learning experts at U.N. Environment, UNDP, and UNITAR, respectively, and coordinators of the joint UNDP-U.N. Environment National Adaptation Plans Global Support Programme (NAP-GAP) “…[H]ow do we respond to a world of increasing uncertainty induced by…More


U.S. EPA Approves Use Of Bacteria-Infected Mosquitoes To Suppress Wild Populations In Limited…

Nature: U.S. government approves ‘killer’ mosquitoes to fight disease “The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved the use of a common bacterium to kill wild mosquitoes that transmit viruses such as dengue, yellow fever, and Zika, Nature’s news team has learned. On 3 November, the agency told biotechnology start-up MosquitoMate that it could release…More


UNFPA Report Calls For More Equitable Access To Family Planning, Reproductive Health Services…

Woodrow Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program’s “New Security Beat”: Unequal Women, Insecure World: The State of the World’s Population in the Age of Inequality Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba, assistant professor at Rhodes College and non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, discusses results from the UNFPA’s State of the World Population report, which focuses…More


Urgent Action Needed To Respond To Climate Change’s Impact On Health

The Lancet: Counting down to climate change Editorial Board “Climate change is commonly discussed in the context of its future impact, but the Lancet Countdown on health and climate change … exposes the urgency for a response as environmental changes cause damaging effects on health worldwide now. The comprehensive review describes the first results of…More


Don’t give up before you even tried ! (or what I wish Naomi Klein’s interview in Antwerp…

Last Sunday  we went with a group of ex-ITM-colleagues to hear Naomi Klein talk about her latest  book “No is not enough” in the beautiful De Roma theater in Antwerp. A journalist led the conversation with Naomi. Her questions were unfortunately almost exclusively focused on Trump, a topic Klein didn’t manage to escape either. Klein’s latest book is indeed for a large part about who Trump really is (his own “lifestyle” brand, out to make profit by being true to his brand’s values), but it ends with a strong call for unification of efforts to access political power and for immediate action. Yet by limiting the discussion to Trump, and despite the relevance of Klein’s analysis, the audience was left with a sense of helplessness and fatalism


Norwegian, Chinese Approaches To Aid Offer Insight For Policy Debates On Aid Effectiveness

Washington Post: Why do nations invest in international aid? Ask Norway. And China. Dan Banik, professor of political science and research director, and Nikolai Hegertun, PhD candidate in political science and research fellow, both at the Center for Development and the Environment at the University of Oslo “…We recently studied Norwegian and Chinese aid to…More


Water is For Fighting Over

Mark Twain is often credited for the quote, “Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over”. Despite the quote’s likely questionable origin, water is becoming an increasingly angry and thirsty elephant-in-the-room for world leaders. Tipped as the “oil of the 21st century”, will swelling water demands precipitate the levels of conflict seen with oil? Or can such an intrinsic aspect of human life avoid the geopolitical issues associated with the more volatile liquid? There is no denying the importance of water in global growth; a critical overarching ingredient for nearly all 17 SDGs in one way or another


We all have to die of something, so why bother being healthy?

0000-0002-1767-4576It’s 6:45 on a cold and rainy Tuesday morning. The alarm blares. As you begin to wake and wonder how it could possibly be morning already, your good intentions dawn on you. It’s run morning – and it’s the last thing you want to do.


Turn left, then right: political changes in Latin America and their impact on health systems

As you might have noticed, Latin America is going through a period of important political changes and turmoil. As the political pendulum is swinging back, more and more conservative (or downright neoliberal) governments are replacing the democratic, progressive ones that were prevailing in previous years. These changes have a number of causes, among others the fact that many voters have perhaps grown a bit tired of these progressive governments after some years in power (as is the case in all democracies with incumbents), the lack of effectiveness of their administration, as well as a perception of (too much) political patronage, bureaucracy and corruption. Importantly, however, a structured strategy from right-wing politicians and parties to remove progressive governments from power (and ditch their policies) also played a key role, via so-called parliamentary coups d’état, ultimately ‘soft’ versions of the ones that have taken place in previous decades in the region. This strategy has been put into action since June 2009, when the Honduran Congress resolved the destitution of President Manuel Zelaya, considering that his government’s actions were violating the Constitution and the judiciary order of the Central American country.


Wilson Center Panelists Highlight Importance Of Community Engagement In Building Resilient…

Woodrow Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program’s “New Security Beat”: It Takes a Village: Communities Are Key to a Resilient Health System This post highlights remarks from panelists at a Wilson Center event co-hosted by CARE and the Maternal Health Initiative, during which global health experts discussed the importance of building “resilient health systems…More


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