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Intimate partner violence and HIV in sub-Saharan African

The findings indicate that male controlling behaviour in its own right, or as an indicator of ongoing or severe violence, puts women at risk of HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions should focus on high-prevalence areas and men with controlling behaviour, in addition to violence.

800px-Community_health_worker_gives_a_vaccination_in_Odisha_state,_India_(8380317750)

To Eradicate HIV by 2030, We Must Invest in Health Workers

In September, UNAIDS announced its plan to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, using its new fast-track strategy.The strategy relies upon countries to step up their investments and the pace at which they deliver HIV services, especially antiretroviral therapies.And it emphasizes a “90-90-90” target—that is, enabling 90% of people living with HIV to know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their status to have access to HIV treatment, and 90% of people on HIV treatment to achieve viral suppressions.These are worthy goals, but ambitious.They will require greater investments not only in antiretroviral therapies, rapid viral load testing kits, and condoms, but in strengthening fragile health systems. That means financing better health infrastructures, building laboratories, and—perhaps most importantly—investments in health workers, on whose shoulders will fall the burden of reaching the most at-risk populations in underserved communities.In an emergency, nothing can compensate for an inadequate supply of skilled health workers.  When the HIV epidemic first began, it was described as an emergency pandemic. We knew little, and little could be done for those infected and their families. Health workers were frightened to deal with clients or suffered burnout from caring for those for whom they knew there was no hope.As we learned more about the virus and, eventually, how to control and treat infections, health workers became more confident and able to handle prevention, treatment, and care.The disease transitioned from an emergency to a developmental effort.Now we are facing an Ebola epidemic, and it carries many of the same underlying challenges we saw during the emergency phases of HIV.But we know now, after decades of dealing with HIV, that the backbone of any response to a global health emergency is made up of health workers—especially those who can provide primary care and are trained, recruited, and retained in health posts near vulnerable communities.In an emergency, nothing can compensate for an inadequate supply of skilled health workers.My point is this: Donor and country intervention plans that focus on HIV treatment and preventing new infections must be complemented with a balanced focus on strengthening the health system, specifically the health workforce.The money and human resources devoted to HIV have been huge. But new resources for health systems strengthening have been modest by comparison

IHME wiki

Health Service Delivery Reports in Uganda, Kenya, & Zambia

IHME and multiple partners release reports on the status of health service delivery in Uganda, Kenya, and Zambia, including the capacity of health facilities, ART programs, Read More

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Intimate partner violence and HIV in sub-Saharan African

Purple_ribbon.svg

The findings indicate that male controlling behaviour in its own right, or as an indicator of ongoing or severe violence, puts women at risk of HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions should focus on high-prevalence areas and men with controlling behaviour, in addition to violence.


South Africa To Spend $2.2B Over 2 Years On HIV Antiretrovirals

Reuters: South Africa to spend $2.2 billion on HIV drugs in next two years “South Africa plans to spend $2.2 billion over two years to buy HIV/AIDS drugs for public hospitals, a government minister said on Monday, as a study shows the prevalence of the virus is rising…” (Motsoenen, 11/17).


Infographic Examines Potential Human Impact Of $300M In PEPFAR Funding

amfAR: Infographic: FY2015 U.S. Global AIDS Budget Plan: The Human Impact “…To maintain the current total level of U.S. global HIV/AIDS funding in Fiscal Year 2015, the U.S. House of Representatives has proposed restoring $300 million in PEPFAR funding.


Most Money for Health Is Subnational, But What Will Donors Do About It?

In the big federal countries where global disease burden is concentrated, most public money for health isn’t ultimately spent by the national ministry of health, the traditional counterpart for global health funders and technical agencies. Instead, most money is programmed and spent subnationally (see figure 1).


To Eradicate HIV by 2030, We Must Invest in Health Workers

800px-Community_health_worker_gives_a_vaccination_in_Odisha_state,_India_(8380317750)

In September, UNAIDS announced its plan to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, using its new fast-track strategy.The strategy relies upon countries to step up their investments and the pace at which they deliver HIV services, especially antiretroviral therapies.And it emphasizes a “90-90-90” target—that is, enabling 90% of people living with HIV to know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their status to have access to HIV treatment, and 90% of people on HIV treatment to achieve viral suppressions.These are worthy goals, but ambitious.They will require greater investments not only in antiretroviral therapies, rapid viral load testing kits, and condoms, but in strengthening fragile health systems. That means financing better health infrastructures, building laboratories, and—perhaps most importantly—investments in health workers, on whose shoulders will fall the burden of reaching the most at-risk populations in underserved communities.In an emergency, nothing can compensate for an inadequate supply of skilled health workers.  When the HIV epidemic first began, it was described as an emergency pandemic. We knew little, and little could be done for those infected and their families. Health workers were frightened to deal with clients or suffered burnout from caring for those for whom they knew there was no hope.As we learned more about the virus and, eventually, how to control and treat infections, health workers became more confident and able to handle prevention, treatment, and care.The disease transitioned from an emergency to a developmental effort.Now we are facing an Ebola epidemic, and it carries many of the same underlying challenges we saw during the emergency phases of HIV.But we know now, after decades of dealing with HIV, that the backbone of any response to a global health emergency is made up of health workers—especially those who can provide primary care and are trained, recruited, and retained in health posts near vulnerable communities.In an emergency, nothing can compensate for an inadequate supply of skilled health workers.My point is this: Donor and country intervention plans that focus on HIV treatment and preventing new infections must be complemented with a balanced focus on strengthening the health system, specifically the health workforce.The money and human resources devoted to HIV have been huge. But new resources for health systems strengthening have been modest by comparison


Health Service Delivery Reports in Uganda, Kenya, & Zambia

IHME wiki

IHME and multiple partners release reports on the status of health service delivery in Uganda, Kenya, and Zambia, including the capacity of health facilities, ART programs, Read More


Opinion Pieces Address Ebola Quarantines, Development Of Treatments, Vaccines

New England Journal of Medicine: Panic, Paranoia, and Public Health — The AIDS Epidemic’s Lessons for Ebola Gregg Gonsalves, HIV/AIDS activist and co-director of the Yale Global Health Justice Partnership at Yale Law School and Yale School of Public Health, and Peter Staley, HIV/AIDS activist “For those of us who lived through the early days…More


Al Jazeera Highlights Documentary On HIV Treatment Access In Developing Countries

Al Jazeera: Fire in the Blood Al Jazeera highlights the documentary film “Fire in the Blood,” which addresses “the challenges NGOs, doctors, and activists face in their fight against big pharma and patent laws that prevent millions of HIV/AIDS patients in the developing world from accessing lifesaving drugs…” The film will air November 7 on…More


Stephen Lewis, Archbishop Emeritus Tutu Comment On HIV/AIDS In South Africa At Press Briefing

News outlets report on comments made Tuesday at a press conference in Johannesburg organized by the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC). The Guardian: U.K. has ‘signed a death warrant’ for South Africans with HIV-AIDS “One of the world’s leading AIDS activists has accused Britain of ‘signing a death warrant’ for South Africans in need of treatment…More


Selecting WHO’s Next Africa Regional Director: An Interview with Candidate Dr. Matshidiso…

In November, the World Health Organization will select its next regional director for Africa. As we wrote in a previous blog, this position is not posted publicly and has no independent mechanism in place to recommend, interview, and evaluate the best qualified candidates. We invited each candidate to use the Center’s platform to discuss his or her vision for the future of the WHO Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO), how he or she sees current challenges, and why he or she is best suited for the position.


PEPFAR, Elton John Foundation Announce New Public-Private Partnership

News outlets report on an announcement by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and singer and activist Elton John on a new HIV/AIDS partnership between PEPFAR and the Elton John Foundation. Metro Weekly: Elton John and PEPFAR team up to fight HIV/AIDS “Secretary Kerry announced that the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR,…More


For HIV Positive Moroccans, Life is Grim

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By Mark Minton CASABLANCA, MOROCCO – With his fair complexion and auburn hair, 21-year-old Samir is often mistaken for a foreigner. But Samir is a native Read More


Looking at Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in the Field

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This piece originally appeared on the Huffington Post.Amos Emmanuel Kakere really wanted to undergo voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC).A slight young man who looked far younger than his mere 24 years, Kakere, who is married and lives in Mhango village in Tanzania’s Shinyanga region, opted to undergo the procedure after seeing a large VMMC mobile field clinic near his village.The clinic, housed in a large, deployable tent and powered by a massive generator, with a waiting area and operating tables inside, was erected and run by IntraHealth International-trained health workers. The mobile clinic reaches 25,000 local men and young boys over the age of 10 from three villages who want to undergo VMMC but do not have access to nearby health facilities.”I was passing nearby and heard there was a tent and asked what was being done,” Kakere said through translation. “I was anxious to get the service.”Voluntary medical male circumcision is a common, 15- to 20-minute procedure that reduces HIV acquisition by 60 percent during heterosexual sex. VMMC is considered to be one of the easiest and most effective methods to reduce HIV transmission.When I asked him how he felt about the procedure, Constantine gave a thumbs-up and simply said, “Poa,” which means “cool” in Swahili. It’s been found, surprisingly, that women in sub-Saharan Africa tend to be excellent targets of VMMC messaging, as they encourage their partners to get circumcised and they understand that while not foolproof, a circumcised partner poses a lesser HIV threat than one who isn’t.Village announcement campaigns also educate and bring in potential VMMC clients


Prioritizing HIV Treatment Among Children Necessary To End Epidemic

The Lancet’s “Global Health Blog”: Putting children at the center of the end of AIDS Charles Lyons, president and CEO of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, discusses the importance of prioritizing HIV treatment among children in order to reach the goal of ending HIV/AIDS among children, as well as the goal of ending the epidemic more…More


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