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WHO declares end of Ebola outbreak in Nigeria

The Ebola virus was introduced into Nigeria on 20 July when an infected Liberian man arrived by aeroplane into Lagos, Africa’s most populous city. The man, who died in hospital 5 days later, set off a chain of transmission that infected a total of 19 people, of whom 7 died. According to WHO recommendations, the end of an Ebola virus disease outbreak in a country can be declared once 42 days have passed and no new cases have been detected. The 42 days represents twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola (21 days). This 42-day period starts from the last day that any person in the country had contact with a confirmed or probable Ebola case.

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Realpolitik and global pandemics | The Lancet Global Health Blog

Vin Gupta | “President Barack Obama’s call to the UN for a more urgent multinational response to the Ebola outbreak that has stricken West Africa Read More

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Dr. Paul Farmer: ‘An Ebola Diagnosis Need Not be a Death Sentence’

Photo by Rebecca E. Rollins / Partners In HealthDr. Paul Farmer and members of the PIH Advance Ebola Response Team meet with Liberian health care workers during a recent visit to the Martha Tubman Memorial Hospital in Zwedru, Liberia. This week the London Review of Books published an essay by PIH Co-founder Dr. Paul Farmer in which he reflects on a recent trip to Liberia and assesses the severity of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa

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Correction: Use of Humanised Rat Basophilic Leukaemia Cell Line RS-ATL8 for the Assessment of…

by The PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases Staff


WHO declares end of Ebola outbreak in Nigeria

WHO

The Ebola virus was introduced into Nigeria on 20 July when an infected Liberian man arrived by aeroplane into Lagos, Africa’s most populous city. The man, who died in hospital 5 days later, set off a chain of transmission that infected a total of 19 people, of whom 7 died. According to WHO recommendations, the end of an Ebola virus disease outbreak in a country can be declared once 42 days have passed and no new cases have been detected. The 42 days represents twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola (21 days). This 42-day period starts from the last day that any person in the country had contact with a confirmed or probable Ebola case.


Realpolitik and global pandemics | The Lancet Global Health Blog

lancet

Vin Gupta | “President Barack Obama’s call to the UN for a more urgent multinational response to the Ebola outbreak that has stricken West Africa Read More


Dr. Paul Farmer: ‘An Ebola Diagnosis Need Not be a Death Sentence’

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

Photo by Rebecca E. Rollins / Partners In HealthDr. Paul Farmer and members of the PIH Advance Ebola Response Team meet with Liberian health care workers during a recent visit to the Martha Tubman Memorial Hospital in Zwedru, Liberia. This week the London Review of Books published an essay by PIH Co-founder Dr. Paul Farmer in which he reflects on a recent trip to Liberia and assesses the severity of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa


Effect of Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria on Host Biomarkers Potentially Relevant for Tuberculosis…

by S. Dhanasekaran, Synne Jenum, Ruth Stavrum, Harald G. Wiker, John Kenneth, Mario Vaz, T.


Inhibition or Knockdown of ABC Transporters Enhances Susceptibility of Adult and Juvenile…

by Ravi S. Kasinathan, Lalit Kumar Sharma, Charles Cunningham, Thomas R. Webb, Robert M


Impact of Schistosoma mansoni on Malaria Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Martial L. Ndeffo Mbah, Laura Skrip, Scott Greenhalgh, Peter Hotez, Alison P. Galvani Background Sub-Saharan Africa harbors the majority of the global burden of malaria and schistosomiasis infections


Mycetoma Medical Therapy

by Oliverio Welsh, Hail Mater Al-Abdely, Mario Cesar Salinas-Carmona, Ahmed Hassan Fahal Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.


Dengue Virus Neutralizing Antibody Levels Associated with Protection from Infection in Thai…

by Darunee Buddhari, Jared Aldstadt, Timothy P. Endy, Anon Srikiatkhachorn, Butsaya Thaisomboonsuk, Chonticha Klungthong, Ananda Nisalak, Benjawan Khuntirat, Richard G. Jarman, Stefan Fernandez, Stephen J.


Evaluation of Commercially Available Diagnostic Tests for the Detection of Dengue Virus NS1…

by Elizabeth A. Hunsperger, Sutee Yoksan, Philippe Buchy, Vinh Chau Nguyen, Shamala Devi Sekaran, Delia A.


Co-infections of Malaria and Geohelminthiasis in Two Rural Communities of Nkassomo and Vian in…

by Francis Zeukeng, Viviane Hélène Matong Tchinda, Jude Daiga Bigoga, Clovis Hugues Tiogang Seumen, Edward Shafe Ndzi, Géraldine Abonweh, Valérie Makoge, Amédée Motsebo, Roger Somo Moyou Background Human co-infection with malaria and helmimths is ubiquitous throughout Africa. Nevertheless, its public health significance on malaria severity remains poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To contribute to a better understanding of epidemiology and control of this co-infection in Cameroon, a cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the prevalence of concomitant intestinal geohelminthiasis and malaria, and to evaluate its association with malaria and anaemia in Nkassomo and Vian.


QTL Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Temephos Resistance in Larvae of the Mosquito Aedes…

by Guadalupe del Carmen Reyes-Solis, Karla Saavedra-Rodriguez, Adriana Flores Suarez, William C. Black Introduction The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae.


The Phylogeography of Rabies in Grenada, West Indies, and Implications for Control

by Ulrike Zieger, Denise A. Marston, Ravindra Sharma, Alfred Chikweto, Keshaw Tiwari, Muzzamil Sayyid, Bowen Louison, Hooman Goharriz, Katja Voller, Andrew C.


Early Double-Negative Thymocyte Export in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Restricted by…

by Ailin Lepletier, Liliane de Almeida, Leonardo Santos, Luzia da Silva Sampaio, Bruno Paredes, Florencia Belén González, Célio Geraldo Freire-de-Lima, Juan Beloscar, Oscar Bottasso, Marcelo Einicker-Lamas, Ana Rosa Pérez, Wilson Savino, Alexandre Morrot The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments. Acute infection results in severe atrophy of the organ and early release of immature thymocytes into the periphery. To date, the pathophysiological effects of thymic changes promoted by parasite-inducing premature release of thymocytes to the periphery has remained elusive


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