Infectious Disease

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Meet the amazing cast behind a life-changing drug

It was well after midnight in San Francisco when Eugenio (“Geno”) de Hostos picked up the phone—but when his colleagues in China answered, he felt the familiar jolt of excitement. He’d felt the same thrill at dawn, talking to his colleagues in Switzerland. At five, in a call to Maryland with the US Food and […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesWaking from sleeping sickness in the DRCThe surprising consequences of tuberculosisPATH is at SXSW ;

Photo: PATH/Lynn Heinisch.

Lessons from the front lines

In the midst of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a 21-year-old Guinean student came to a Dakar health clinic with symptoms of fever and diarrhea. The doctor considered Ebola, which had killed more than 1,000 people in neighboring Guinea. But the patient wasn’t bleeding. He denied having been in contact with Ebola patients […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesIn Davos, Rx for epidemics: tech partnershipsInnovation is at the heart of SeattleOur 8 favorite photos of 2016 ;

To Use or Not to Use: the Clinical Dilemma of Antimicrobials

    Understandably frustrated after 4 weeks of mild coughing, a nicely dressed businesswoman had come for an evaluation. I looked for infection in her Read More

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American Zika in 2016 and 2017: The Strange Case of Mr. Hyde and Dr. Jekyll

As North America heads into summer, Peter Hotez, co-Editor-in-Chief of PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, discusses the risk for Zika outbreaks and hopes Mr. Hyde doesn’t rear his ugly head. In 1886 Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson published


Safe Burial Teams Likely Prevented Significant Number Of Additional Ebola Cases In West African…

Agence France-Presse: Ebola burial teams dramatically reduced West Africa outbreak: study “Red Cross volunteers prevented a significant number of Ebola cases during the 2013-2016 epidemic in West Africa by using safe burial techniques, according to a study released Thursday…” (Larson, 6/22). BBC News: Ebola virus burial teams may have ‘saved thousands of lives’ “…The study,…More


CSIS Podcast Features Episodes Discussing Links Between Climate Change, Infectious Diseases;…

Center for Strategic & International Studies’ “Take as Directed”: Global Health Security and Climate Change Steve Morrison, senior vice president at CSIS and director of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, speaks with Ron Klain, general counsel of Revolution LLC and White House Ebola response coordinator from fall 2014 to spring 2015. “We asked him…More


The interplay of climate, intervention and imported cases as determinants of the 2014 dengue…

by Qu Cheng, Qinlong Jing, Robert C. Spear, John M. Marshall, Zhicong Yang, Peng Gong Dengue is a fast spreading mosquito-borne disease that affects more than half of the population worldwide


Development of ELISAs for diagnosis of acute typhoid fever in Nigerian children

by Jiin Felgner, Aarti Jain, Rie Nakajima, Li Liang, Algis Jasinskas, Eduardo Gotuzzo, Joseph M. Vinetz, Fabio Miyajima, Munir Pirmohamed, Fatimah Hassan-Hanga, Dominic Umoru, Binta Wudil Jibir, Safiya Gambo, Kudirat Olateju, Philip L. Felgner, Stephen Obaro, D


Challenges in preparing and implementing a clinical trial at field level in an Ebola emergency:…

by Sara Carazo Perez, Elin Folkesson, Xavier Anglaret, Abdoul-Habib Beavogui, Emmanuel Berbain, Alseny-Modet Camara, Evelyn Depoortere, Annabelle Lefevre, Piet Maes, Kristian Nødtvedt Malme, Jean-Marie Denis Malvy, Sien Ombelet, Geertrui Poelaert, Daouda Sissoko, Alexis Tounkara, Pierre Trbovic, Pascal Piguet, Annick Antierens Author summary: During the large Ebola outbreak that affected West Africa in 2014 and 2015, studies were launched to evaluate potential treatments for the disease. A clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the antiviral drug favipiravir was conducted in Guinea.


Human lagochilascariasis—A rare helminthic disease

by Dulcinea Maria Barbosa Campos, Alverne Passos Barbosa, Jayrson Araújo de Oliveira, Giovana Galvão Tavares, Pedro Vitor Lemos Cravo, Alejandro Luquetti Ostermayer Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a helminth of the order Ascaroidea, genus Lagochilascaris that comprises 6 species, among which only Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909, is implicated in the human form of the disease. It is remarkable that the majority of cases of human lagochilascariasis in the Americas have been reported in Brazil.


Estimating the number of secondary Ebola cases resulting from an unsafe burial and risk factors…

by Amanda Tiffany, Benjamin D. Dalziel, Hilary Kagume Njenge, Ginger Johnson, Roselyn Nugba Ballah, Daniel James, Abdoulaye Wone, Juliet Bedford, Amanda McClelland Background Safely burying Ebola infected individuals is acknowledged to be important for controlling Ebola epidemics and was a major component of the 2013–2016 West Africa Ebola response. Yet, in order to understand the impact of safe burial programs it is necessary to elucidate the role of unsafe burials in sustaining chains of Ebola transmission and how the risk posed by activities surrounding unsafe burials, including care provided at home prior to death, vary with human behavior and geography.


Study Examines Likely Hosts Of Next Zoonotic Disease Outbreak

International Business Times: Scientists locate where the most deadly ‘missing viruses’ are hiding “…Many of the most deadly human diseases jump to people from other species. HIV and Ebola originated in other primates and SARS is thought to have come from bats. Now scientists think they know which viruses are most likely to leap from…More


E.U.’s Highest Court Rules Courts Can Consider Vaccines As Cause Of Illnesses Without…

Associated Press: E.U. court: Vaccines can be blamed for illnesses without proof “The highest court of the European Union ruled Wednesday that courts can consider whether a vaccination led to someone developing an illness even when there is no scientific proof. … On Wednesday, the E.U.’s top court said that despite the lack of scientific…More


WHO, Partners To Send 1M Cholera Vaccine Doses To Yemen; Country’s Health Care System…

Associated Press: War-torn Yemen to get cholera vaccines as death toll mounts “The U.N. health agency and some major partners have agreed to send one million doses of cholera vaccine to Yemen to help stanch a spiraling and increasingly deadly caseload in the impoverished country, which is already facing war and the risk of famine…”…More


More Political Will, Funding, Training Needed To Reduce TB-Related Deaths In India

New York Times: What Killed Half a Million Indians? Pranay Sinha, a physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Scott K. Heysell, a physician and associate professor of medicine, infectious diseases, and international health at the University of Virginia “…A staggering number of Indians — over 400 million — are estimated to be infected with TB.…More


The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular <i>Mycobacterium leprae</i>…

by Song-Hyo Jin, Sung-Kwan An, Seong-Beom Lee Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated.


Incidence and mortality due to snakebite in the Americas

by Jean-Philippe Chippaux Background Better knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics of snakebites could help to take measures to improve their management. The incidence and mortality of snakebites in the Americas are most often estimated from medical and scientific literature, which generally lack precision and representativeness.


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