Noncommunicable Disease

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Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation

Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation The Life Equation is a documentary about a impossible choices. When José meets Crecencia Buch, a Read More

Navigating hearing disabilities in Morocco

Published with permission from Round Earth Media  By Maria Luisa Frasson-Nori RABAT, Morocco – In an inconspicuous brown building sandwiched between a tire shop and Read More

“Depression: let’s talk” says WHO, as depression tops list of causes of ill health

Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives. The new estimates have been released in the lead-up to World Health Day on 7 April, the high point in WHO’s year-long campaign “Depression: let’s talk”.

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Contemporary issues in global health

The global health community recently descended on Washington DC for the discipline’s annual conference held under the capable auspices of the ‘Consortium of Universities for Global Health’. Many of the session topics, satellite sessions, and coffee-break conversations offered microcosmic illustrations of global health issues and evolving trends that warrant further discussion outside of this microcosm. We don’t understand what Planetary Health is, but we know it’s important The theme of the conference – healthy people, health ecosystems – was an uncontroversial choice that plays to the dominant development zeitgeist. Climate change is undeniably preeminent as a global health threat, however it is clear than no one feels particularly confident with the subject – planetary health is still too big and too complex for most. Part of the problem is that the exact definition of planetary health is still up for grabs


One man, 441 people, and a community for healthier hearts

Meet Mr. Ta Van Phu, a retired health worker and former leader in the military. With pen and pencil in his left pocket, glasses squarely centered on his face, and a shoulder bag containing his blood pressure monitor and educational materials about heart disease, Mr. Phu is a welcome sight as he walks from house […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesNew tools and a “zambitious” goal to end malariaThe surprising consequences of tuberculosisEnsuring vaccines reach the people who need them most ;


Is Climate Change to blame for the East African Drought?

An honest attempt to engage with the evidence may seem almost quaint in these angry, post-truth times, but I was impressed by a recent Oxfam media briefing by Tracy Carty on the thorny topic of whether climate change is to blame for the current East African drought. It’s an excellent example of the balancing act advocacy organizations have to perform on attribution: start making sweeping …


Biomedical research benefits bring House members, NIH leaders together

Categories: Research and DevelopmentIn the face of a proposal by the Trump administration to cut funding for the National Institutes of Health by nearly a quarter with an $8 billion drop, House members hold a hearing that covers “from AIDS to Zika,” the “Cancer Moonshot,” the quest for a universal flu vaccine, how researchers working in their own […](Read more…)


Three things we need to know about “SOGI”

May 17 is the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, or IDAHOT. Why should we care about IDAHOT? Because sexual orientation and gender identity, or SOGI, matters. Here are three things we need to know about SOGI: First, SOGI inclusion is about zero discrimination. Despite some legal and social progress in the past two decades, LGBTI people continue to face widespread discrimination and violence in many countries


Using a mobile health application to reduce #alcohol consumption

Smartphone applications (“apps”) offer promise as tools to help people monitor and reduce their alcohol consumption.


Americans, Foreign Policy Community Should Defend, Advance LGBT Equality Worldwide

Washington Post: Joe Biden: Americans must stand with LGBT people around the world Joe Biden, former vice president of the United States “…[A]ny person of conscience, regardless of their religious or partisan beliefs, should be able to agree: Violence against any person, in any form, is intolerable. No one should be killed, tortured, assaulted, or…More


CSIS Podcast Features Interview With Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon CEO Celina Schocken

Center for Strategic & International Studies’ “Take as Directed”: Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon and the Fight Against Cervical Cancer Janet Fleischman, senior associate with the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, interviews Celina Schocken, CEO of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, “an independent affiliate of the George W. Bush Institute that focuses on cervical and breast cancer…More


New Treatment Guidelines, Developments In Technology Can Help Sub-Saharan African Countries…

Scientific American: Helping Cancer’s Forgotten Victims Sally Cowal, senior vice president of global cancer control at the American Cancer Society, and Jennifer Ryan Crozier, IBM’s vice president of corporate citizenship and president of the IBM International Foundation “…[During a meeting that took place in Nairobi last month, for] the first time, cancer treatment guidelines were…More


Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation

Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation The Life Equation is a documentary about a impossible choices. When José meets Crecencia Buch, a Read More


USAID Partnerships Aim To Bring Peace, Prosperity To Fragile States, Improve U.S. National…

The Hill: Leveraging USAID partnerships promotes peace and prosperity Greg Huger, senior associate with the Project on U.S. Leadership in Development at the Center for Strategic and International Studies “Here is a simple truth: The stability of any nation rises or declines in direct relation to its economic well-being. That’s why the United States —…More


Global Road Safety Week Aims To Raise Awareness Of, Advance Solutions For Road Traffic…

Project Syndicate: Reducing Speed to Save Lives Margaret Chan, director general of the WHO, and Michael Bloomberg, WHO’s global ambassador for noncommunicable diseases “We can save so many lives around the world if we just slow down. Each year, more than 1.25 million people — many of them young people — die in automobile crashes.…More


Working in Global Health: Katie Kralievits

Matt Cashore / University of Notre DameDr. Salmaan Keshavjee (from left), Dr. Paul Farmer, Katie Kralievits, and Ophelia Dahl leave the University of Notre Dame following a recent book workshop. I grew up with a close connection to Haiti.


Speed management key to saving lives, making cities more liveable

Managing speed, a new report from WHO, suggests that excessive or inappropriate speed contributes to 1 in 3 road traffic fatalities worldwide.


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