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What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More

How to take morphine in rural Guatemala

Rosa is a 59-year-old woman dying1 of a broken heart: in her heart is a hole that surgeons cannot fix, and the irregular flow of Read More

The God of empty spaces: Thoughts on religion and civil society in neoliberal Guatemala

The other day I visited Lydia, a 56-year-old Maya woman who lives with her family in the highlands of Guatemala and has for many years Read More

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Fecal Sludge Management Critical To Effective Sanitation Solutions In India

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists”: How our cities’ sanitation problem is damaging health Madhu Krishna, country lead for water, sanitation, and hygiene at BMGF, India, discusses the importance of fecal sludge management in India’s cities. She writes, “As states and cities start work on developing city-wide fecal sludge management systems, the ecosystem of…More


Share It Again: New Social Media Features for Premium and Business Users

Premium and Business users can now re-share posts to social media, using our new Targeted Social Media feature.


A cross-sectional study of the income sources of primary care health workers in the Democratic…

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the state system to remunerate health workers is poorly functional, encouraging diversification of income sources and corruption.


Global health in 2017

I don’t know about you, but I am still in that weird part of the dawning year where writing the date seems like I am playing main stage in a Hollywood ‘sci-fi’ movie. Where the four numbers of 2 – 0 – 1 – 7 seem more of something I would associate with flying cars and robot servants, than the ‘here and now’. But strange as it may seem we are well into the New Year and as the pace of the world reflects the pace of passing time, I can’t help but wonder if we actually do live in the future. So to speak. We now call for a cab via west coast America using a democratized application on a globally connected device no bigger than our palm, manufactured on another continent and possessing the technological potency we could never have even dreamt of just a decade ago – linked to another billion similar devices through millions of miles of fibre-optics spanning the entire planet


Perceived discrimination and low back pain among 28,532 workers in South Korea: Effect…

Publication date: March 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 177 Author(s): Nagyeong Lee, Hyoju Sung, Ji-Hwan Kim, Laura Punnett, Seung-Sup Kim Objectives This study investigated the association between workplace discrimination and low back pain among Korean workers and explored the role of labor union in the association.


What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More


Early-life and adult socioeconomic determinants of myocardial infarction incidence and fatality

Publication date: March 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 177 Author(s): Fanny Kilpi, Karri Silventoinen, Hanna Konttinen, Pekka Martikainen Social inequalities in coronary heart disease mortality have roots in childhood conditions, but it is unknown whether they are associated both with the incidence of the disease and the following survival.


Sibo Tuyishimire: Top Rwandan Student and Cancer Survivor

Photo by Zack DeClerck / Partners In HealthSibo Tuyishimire (left) was one of the first cancer patients Dr. Sara Stulac (right), PIH’s deputy chief medical officer, treated in Rwanda. Hillside School’s unique attraction is its working farm. The all-boys school in Marlborough, Massachusetts, aims to give students an appreciation for the environment and for hard work.


U.S. Government-Supported MIT Research Team Examining Various Types Of Food Aid Delivery Bags…

Devex: Redesigning USAID’s food aid bags could prevent 10,000 tons from going bad and save $15m a year “Researchers are experimenting with new ways of packaging U.S. food aid in a bid to ensure as much of the food as possible feeds the hungry in developing countries and humanitarian crises. … [L]ast year USAID and…More


How to take morphine in rural Guatemala

Rosa is a 59-year-old woman dying1 of a broken heart: in her heart is a hole that surgeons cannot fix, and the irregular flow of Read More


U.N. SG Guterres, U.S. President-Elect Trump Have ‘Very Positive Discussion’ In…

Reuters: After disparaging United Nations, Trump and new U.N. chief talk “New United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres spoke with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the two had ‘a very positive discussion on U.S./U.N. relations,’ said a U.N.


2016 in Review: Your favorite social media content

Another year has passed, and as we do each year-end, here’s a rundown of what content resonated most with you on World Bank social media in 2016. Four World Bank Facebook posts you cared about most Some of our most popular and engaging content on Facebook in 2016 was, not surprisingly, multimedia. Check out these posts that made the biggest impact with you in the last year. On October 17 – now recognized as End Poverty Day – Bangladeshi singer Habib Wahid unveiled a new song singing the praises of his country’s rapid progress in reducing poverty and building a prosperous society.


Haiti’s New Pathology Lab Accelerates Cancer Diagnosis

Cecille Joan Avila / Partners In HealthProphete Lagrénade, a histopathology technician, holds a tissue sample in the new pathology section of the regional reference laboratory. Inside a white-washed room the size of a generous walk-in closet, three Partners In Health laboratory technicians and a pathologist meticulously slice tissue samples and embed them in paraffin. They are the first employees to christen the new pathology section in the Mirebalais Regional Reference Laboratory. To outside observers, their work may seem tedious. But to cancer patients, it’s lifesaving


PIH’s Emmanuel Kamanzi on Working in Global Health

Photo by Zack DeClerck / Partners In Health Emmanuel Kamanzi has worked for Partners In Health for almost a decade in many places and roles. He's spent the last three years in PIH's Boston office and is now returning home to Rwanda to take on his biggest project yet—overseeing the building and development of the University of Global Health Equity. We asked him to reflect on his career and offer advice to aspiring global health professionals. Standing on a hill in Burera, a rural district in northern Rwanda, I see other green and terraced hills all around.


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