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What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More

How to take morphine in rural Guatemala

Rosa is a 59-year-old woman dying1 of a broken heart: in her heart is a hole that surgeons cannot fix, and the irregular flow of Read More

The God of empty spaces: Thoughts on religion and civil society in neoliberal Guatemala

The other day I visited Lydia, a 56-year-old Maya woman who lives with her family in the highlands of Guatemala and has for many years Read More

Latest

New Issue Of Foreign Service Journal Focuses On Global Health Diplomacy

Foreign Service Journal: May 2017 The May issue of this journal focuses on global health diplomacy and includes articles on leveraging U.S. health investments globally as tools for diplomacy, PEPFAR’s accomplishments, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ role in global health diplomacy, and the U.S. pandemic response (May 2017).


Contemporary issues in global health

The global health community recently descended on Washington DC for the discipline’s annual conference held under the capable auspices of the ‘Consortium of Universities for Global Health’. Many of the session topics, satellite sessions, and coffee-break conversations offered microcosmic illustrations of global health issues and evolving trends that warrant further discussion outside of this microcosm. We don’t understand what Planetary Health is, but we know it’s important The theme of the conference – healthy people, health ecosystems – was an uncontroversial choice that plays to the dominant development zeitgeist. Climate change is undeniably preeminent as a global health threat, however it is clear than no one feels particularly confident with the subject – planetary health is still too big and too complex for most. Part of the problem is that the exact definition of planetary health is still up for grabs


USAID Partnerships Aim To Bring Peace, Prosperity To Fragile States, Improve U.S. National…

The Hill: Leveraging USAID partnerships promotes peace and prosperity Greg Huger, senior associate with the Project on U.S. Leadership in Development at the Center for Strategic and International Studies “Here is a simple truth: The stability of any nation rises or declines in direct relation to its economic well-being. That’s why the United States —…More


Working in Global Health: Katie Kralievits

Matt Cashore / University of Notre DameDr. Salmaan Keshavjee (from left), Dr. Paul Farmer, Katie Kralievits, and Ophelia Dahl leave the University of Notre Dame following a recent book workshop. I grew up with a close connection to Haiti.


Speed management key to saving lives, making cities more liveable

Managing speed, a new report from WHO, suggests that excessive or inappropriate speed contributes to 1 in 3 road traffic fatalities worldwide.


Contextualising renal patient routines: Everyday space-time contexts, health service access

Publication date: June 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 183 Author(s): Julia McQuoid, Tanisha Jowsey, Girish Talaulikar Stable routines are key to successful illness self-management for the growing number of people living with chronic illness around the world.


Strengthening Immunization in Challenging Settings

Training cold chain mentees in solar direct drive fridges installation Providing routine immunization services is a global public health priority to protect families and children from vaccine-preventable diseases such as polio, measles, and cholera. In South Sudan, the world’s newest country, the need is enormous. Without vaccination, children and their communities may be vulnerable to preventable but deadly and disabling diseases. From 2008 to 2012, South Sudan experienced its largest polio outbreak.


Global mortality variations in patients with heart failure

Marked regional differences in mortality in patients with heart failure persisted after multivariable adjustment for cardiac and non-cardiac factors. Therefore, variations in mortality between regions could be the result of health-care infrastructure, quality and access, or environmental and genetic factors. Further studies in large, global cohorts are needed.


Most Global Health Aid Targets Those Younger Than Age 60, Study Shows

Health Affairs: Vast Majority Of Development Assistance For Health Funds Target Those Below Age Sixty Vegard Skirbekk, senior researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and a professor at the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues note development assistance for health increasingly “targets younger…More


Most Global Health Aid Targets Those Younger Than Age 60, Study Shows

Health Affairs: Vast Majority Of Development Assistance For Health Funds Target Those Below Age Sixty Vegard Skirbekk, senior researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and a professor at the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues note development assistance for health increasingly “targets younger…More


Water security: the key ingredient for soda tax success

Recommended by the World Health Organization, sugar-sweetened beverage taxes have become an attractive policy to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). However, in contexts where water safety and security are equally important issues, there is an imperative need to simultaneously promote water sanitation and access policies to ensure the benefits of a soda tax don’t dry up.  Soda consumption is often high in countries where access to free drinking water is limited. For over half the global population, water insecurity is a daily reality, and so too is the double burden of malnutrition.


U.K., U.S. Anti-Terrorism Laws Inhibiting Humanitarian, Food Aid Deliveries To Drought-Hit…

The Guardian: Anti-terrorism laws have ‘chilling effect’ on vital aid deliveries to Somalia “Strict British and U.S. counter-terrorism laws are discouraging humanitarian organizations from delivering vital emergency assistance to millions of people facing starvation and fatal diseases in drought-hit Somalia. Senior humanitarian officials say the laws, which target any individual or organization found to have…More


‘Big Bond’ Approach To Foreign Aid Could Maximize Efficiency Of Donor Resources In Africa

Project Syndicate: A Big Bond for Africa Nancy Birdsall, president emeritus and senior fellow at the Center for Global Development (CGD), and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, former finance minister of Nigeria and managing director of the World Bank and distinguished visiting fellow at CGD “…While governments in Africa are spending more on public infrastructure themselves, outside finance…More


New Drugs, New Hope to End TB in Peru

Photos by William Castro Rodríguez / Partners In HealthField technician Gaby Merlin Contreras provides the new TB drug, Bedaquiline, to a patient in Lima, Peru. For the first time in 50 years, two new drugs are available to patients battling the most trenchant forms of tuberculosis. TB experts around the world, including those at Partners In Health, hope that Bedaquiline and Delamanid will deliver patients a quicker, less toxic cure than older drugs on the market. They will soon see whether their hope is justified. Through an effort called endTB, PIH and nongovernmental organizations Médecins sans Frontières and Interactive Research & Development are offering new treatment regimens that include Bedaquiline and Delamanid to more than 3,000 people


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