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The Lancet Commission on #GlobalSurgery Report

Global Surgery 2030: evidence and solutions for achieving health, welfare, and economic development Watch Live The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery Report.

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Non Communicable Diseases – A Silent Killer

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent 46% of the global burden of disease and cause 63% of all deaths in the world, equal to 36 million people per year. Annually nine million people die prematurely before the age of 60 as a result of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). People from developing countries suffer the most: 90% of people who die before the age of 60 are from middle and low-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that without prevention, 52 million people will die because of NCDs by 2030. As is the case in all developing countries, Uganda is experiencing important changes in disease patterns.

Haynes food safety

World Health Day Places Focus On Food Safety, ‘From Farm To Plate’

News outlets report on World Health Day, recognized on April 7. The theme of this year’s day is “From farm to plate, make food safe.” Devex: When one country’s food safety problem becomes a global concern “…The U.N. health agency is scheduled to publish by the fourth quarter of this year a final report providing…More

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Groups Continue To Warn TPP Could Harm Access To Medicines As U.S. Senate Votes To Deny Debate…

GlobalPost: This U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal could stop the poor from getting life-saving meds “…[H]undreds of millions of patients around the Pacific rim face losing the chance to use new, cheap generic drugs to treat a host of conditions, including cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and rheumatoid arthritis. That’s thanks to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP,…More


Emerging doctors call for action on global epidemic: non-communicable disease

This week, special guest-bloggers and Australian doctors-in-training, Rebecca Kelly and Tim Martin of the Australian Medical Students’ Association, call for greater focus, discussion and action on the world’s leading causes of death. In March this year, the Australian government released the 2015 Intergenerational report revealing a prediction of the economic and social trends over the next 40 years. There’s some fantastic news; children born in the middle of this century are projected to live greater than 95 years. Importantly, this increase in life expectancy will involve an improved quality of life and Australians will be more prosperous in real terms. However, the report comes with a warning.


WHO Adds New Hepatitis C, Cancer, TB Drugs To Essential Medicines List, Encourages More…

Reuters: WHO adds hepatitis C drugs to essential list, urges lower prices “The World Health Organization has added new curative treatments for hepatitis C to its essential medicines list, but the U.N. agency said prices needed to fall to make them accessible to patients in poorer countries…” (Hirschler, 5/8). WHO: WHO moves to improve access…More


Cervical Cancer Detection in Zimbabwe: A Scalable Solution

It always inspires us to talk with people like Dr. Lowell Schnipper, an oncologist who is running a cervical cancer detection initiative out of St. Albert’s Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe. The work of this team emphasizes prevention, ultra low-cost methods and an emphasis on building local capacity. Cervical cancer hits women of childbearing age and puts families at risk of losing their mothers.


An international comparison of stakeholder motivation to implement liver cancer control

Background The World Health Organization offers clear guidance on the development of national cancer control programmes based on a country’s level of resources, yet the motivation to implement such programmes may be driven by factors other than resources.


Doctor Discusses Successes, Challenges Of Cervical Cancer Detection, Treatment In Zambia

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: HIV response in Zambia calls attention to cancer’s toll Antigone Barton, senior editor and writer of “Science Speaks,” highlights the comments of Kennedy Lishimpi, executive director of the Cancer Diseases Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, at the Center for Strategic & International Studies on April 24, where he discussed…More


The Lancet Commission on #GlobalSurgery Report

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Global Surgery 2030: evidence and solutions for achieving health, welfare, and economic development Watch Live The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery Report.


Cancer Genomics: Data, Data and more Data

PLOS Medicine’s Senior Research Editor, Clare Garvey, recently caught up with Francis Ouellette, the Associate Director of Informatics and Biocomputing at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) to find out about progress in cancer genomics, the issues surrounding the … Continue reading »The post Cancer Genomics: Data, Data and more Data appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.


Providing HPV Vaccine To Women Worldwide Vital To Preventing Cervical Cancer Cases, Deaths

Project Syndicate: Stopping Women’s Next Biggest Killer Anuradha Gupta, deputy CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance “…For the first time, the number of deaths caused by cervical cancer every year is poised to outstrip the total caused by childbirth. … The tragedy is that these deaths are almost entirely preventable. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, coupled…More


Non Communicable Diseases – A Silent Killer

ghh-NCDs

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent 46% of the global burden of disease and cause 63% of all deaths in the world, equal to 36 million people per year. Annually nine million people die prematurely before the age of 60 as a result of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). People from developing countries suffer the most: 90% of people who die before the age of 60 are from middle and low-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that without prevention, 52 million people will die because of NCDs by 2030. As is the case in all developing countries, Uganda is experiencing important changes in disease patterns.


Child Cancer Care and Hospital Hygiene – Can We Have One without the Other?

Jocalyn Clark (@JocalynClark) describes the challenge of achieving and maintaining basic cleanliness and sanitation in a children’s cancer ward in Dhaka, Bangladesh. A couple of years ago I wrote about a talk Wendy Graham gave at the Maternal Health conference … Continue reading »The post Child Cancer Care and Hospital Hygiene – Can We Have One without the Other? appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.


Symposium Explores Global Cancer Care Research

Center for Strategic & International Studies’ “Smart Global Health”: Creating a Roadmap for Global Cancer Care Katey Peck, a program coordinator and research assistant at CSIS, discusses “the 2015 Symposium on Global Cancer Research in Boston. Co-hosted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH),…More


World Health Day Places Focus On Food Safety, ‘From Farm To Plate’

Haynes food safety

News outlets report on World Health Day, recognized on April 7. The theme of this year’s day is “From farm to plate, make food safe.” Devex: When one country’s food safety problem becomes a global concern “…The U.N. health agency is scheduled to publish by the fourth quarter of this year a final report providing…More


Africa Must Prepare for Aging Population Now

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As countries like Japan and Italy prepare for the challenges of the current aging population, African countries are focusing on the need for youth empowerment. Read More


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