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Science, global health, and irrational health behaviors

Ed. Note: Sara Gorman will be joining us once a month to highlight different aspects of her forthcoming book on science denialism.  Have you ever Read More

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Accelerating an Integrated Approach to NCD Prevention and Control Globally

Dr. Samira Asma, Chief, Global NCD Program, CDC Over the past 18 years, I’ve worked with Ministries of Health and other partners in 180 countries to advance CDC’s overarching global health goals and accelerate strategies for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries. NCDs and injuries are responsible for millions of premature deaths, especially in low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). As public health practitioners, we have an important opportunity to work collaboratively to accelerate and scale up implementation of proven prevention and treatment strategies and measure their impact.

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“Ketamine: a growing global health-care need”

  Ketamine is a valued anesthetic tool in all clinical practice settings. In LMICs, however, ketamine is indispensable for addressing the growing burden of surgical Read More

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Friday Think: closing the cervical cancer prevention gap

The Pap smear, colposcopy, biopsy. These are proven lifesavers that screen women for cervical cancer, but only for the women who can access them. For hundreds of millions of women in low and middle income countries, these technologies and treatment innovations (such as CryoPen and thermal coagulation) are expensive, hard to deliver, and often out […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesMy 30 years of hope, empowerment, and politics in reproductive healthMy family legacy: delivering health and equity across generationsSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunity ;


Appreciating Michael Elliott, a compassionate advocate for the most vulnerable

Michael Elliott was a dear friend, a wonderful colleague, and a tireless advocate for the world’s most vulnerable people. While we mourn his passing today, the world is a better place for his work in addressing poverty and inequities in all corners of the globe. Michael led with a clear vision for what the world could […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesMy family legacy: delivering health and equity across generationsSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunityFriday Think: closing the global cervical cancer prevention gap ;


What women want (in HIV protection)

What do women want? Worldwide, women want—and deserve—safe products that enable them to control and protect their own health, whatever their physical, social, or cultural needs. “That’s not just a nice thing to have, it’s a basic human right,” says Darin Zehrung, program advisor at PATH for vaccine and pharmaceutical delivery technologies, “and when it […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunityFriday Think: closing the global cervical cancer prevention gapMeet the superheroes fighting diarrheal disease ;


The risk of falling into poverty after developing heart disease: a survival analysis

Those with a low income are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease.


Countries start to act on noncommunicable diseases but need to speed up efforts to meet global…

A new WHO report highlights the need to intensify national action to meet the global targets governments have agreed to protect people from heart disease, cancers, diabetes, and lung diseases. Globally, these 4 noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) represent the largest cause of death in people aged under 70 years, posing a major threat to sustainable development. The global survey, “Assessing national capacity for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases”, shows that some countries are making remarkable progress. A number of countries have put in place measures to protect people from exposure to tobacco use, harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Some have created new financing opportunities to build strong public health systems by taxing tobacco products.


Advances In Cancer Research Could Guide Work Toward HIV Cure

CNN: Cancer research could help the search towards an HIV cure Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, co-discoverer of HIV and immediate past president of the International AIDS Society; Sharon Lewin, inaugural director of the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity; and Steven Deeks, professor at the University of California San Francisco; and all co-chairs of the IAS…More


INSPIRE: Breaking the Cycle of Violence

This blog was originally posted on The Huffington Post on July 13, 2016 CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden As a society, we have unanimity about few things, but one of these is that no child should be harmed by violence. And yet, every 5 minutes a child somewhere in the world dies a violent death, and half of all children in the world—a billion kids—experience violence each year. Violence—emotional, physical, and sexual—is rampant in high-income countries, including the U.S., as well as in low- and middle-income countries, and across ethnic and racial groups. Three seminal studies the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has done with partners have revealed both the shocking frequency of violence against children, and the devastating, pervasive, life-long health impacts of violence


“It’s not if I get cancer, it’s when I get cancer”: BRCA-positive patients’…

Publication date: August 2016 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 163 Author(s): Marleah Dean Rationale Women with a harmful mutation in the BReast CAncer (BRCA) gene are at significantly increased risk of developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) during their lifetime, compared to those without.


A Cancer Crisis, A Good Solution

Photo by Calvin Kennell-Heiling for Partners In HealthOncology Nurse Educator Clemence Muhayimana mixes chemotherapy at the Butaro Ambulatory Cancer Care Center in Burera District, Rwanda. Since 2012, a Partners In Health-supported public hospital in northern Rwanda has treated thousands of patients for breast cancer, lymphomas, and more. But even Butaro Hospital has struggled to treat late-stage cancers and other conditions needing radiation therapy. Like many developing countries, Rwanda lacks a $4 million radiation therapy machine.


Viral Hepatitis Is A Leading Cause Of Death, Disability Worldwide, Study Shows

Agence France-Presse: Hepatitis outstrips AIDS, TB as killer: report “Virus-caused hepatitis has become a leading cause of death and disability in the world, killing more people in a year than AIDS, tuberculosis, or malaria, a report said Thursday. Deaths from infection, liver disease, and cancer caused by viral hepatitis increased by 63 percent from 890,000…More


Friday Think: closing the global cervical cancer prevention gap

The Pap smear, colposcopy, biopsy. These are proven lifesavers that screen women for cervical cancer, but only for the women who can access them. For hundreds of millions of women in low and middle income countries (LMICs), these technologies and treatment innovations (such as CryoPen and thermal coagulation) are expensive, hard to deliver, and often […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesMy 30 years of hope, empowerment, and politics in reproductive healthATMs dispense clean water in Nairobi’s slumsMeet a period piece designed to bust taboos ;


Smartphone Technology Could Improve Access To Cervical Cancer Screening For Women In Poor,…

Global Health NOW: In Cervical “Selfies,” A Solution “…[A new smartphone] innovation, by Israeli based firm MobileODT, is a compact medical device that comprises a powerful microscope and lighting. It incorporates an Android enabled mobile phone that takes a photograph of the cervix. This non-intrusive system enhances visual assessment (EVA) while storing a digital copy,…More


Knowledge of the signs and symptoms and risk factors of lung cancer in Australia: mixed methods…

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Australia.


Routine screening of Indigenous cancer patients’ unmet support needs: a qualitative study of…

Indigenous Australians have poorer cancer outcomes in terms of incidence mortality and survival compared with non-Indigenous Australians.


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