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The Disruption of the “See-And-Treat” Paradigm: Cervical Cancer Prevention in LMICs

In recent years in global health, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), or “the vinegar test,” has widely been heralded as a simple and cost-effective cervical Read More

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How Smartphones are changing dermatology in Tanzania

Situated in the Mara region of Tanzania, in the northwest between Lake Victoria and the Kenyan Border, the rural village of Shirati is home to Read More

WHO

WHO call to scale up action on NCDs

As world leaders gather at the United Nations General Assembly to assess efforts made since 2011 in controlling noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease, the new WHO “Noncommunicable diseases country profiles 2014″ show progress has been insufficient and uneven. The report provides an updated overview of the NCD situation including recent trends and government responses in 194 countries. It reveals that:

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Rwanda Program Provides Lessons On Providing Cancer Care To Poor

Nature Reviews Cancer: Bringing cancer care to the poor: experiences from Rwanda Rwanda Health Minister Agnes Binagwaho, Lawrence Shulman of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and colleagues from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Rwandan Ministry of Health, and Partners in Health “…[T]he scientific yields of recent decades that have dramatically advanced oncology therapies and saved innumerable…More


The greatest health threat you’ve never heard of, but need to know about.

If you have a conversation with someone about the leading cause of global deaths, discussions will usually turn to Ebola, HIV or TB. Even more so, when we think of the biggest killers in the world’s poorer nations, we tend to think of infectious pandemics, under-nutrition or problems resulting from a lack of clean water and sanitation. At the same time, when we think of challenges like diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancers, we tend to think of lazy, aged populations living with too much, in rich communities. But in reality, both of these statements are completely false – and both insidious yet widespread myths have dire consequences on the health of our populations. This is where a new conversation around the facts becomes crucially important for Global Health.


Efua Dorkenoo, Pioneer To End FGM, Dies Of Cancer At Age 65

News outlets report on the death of women’s rights activist Efua Dorkenoo, who pioneered the movement to end female genital mutilation. The Guardian: Efua Dorkenoo OBE, the ‘incredible African female warrior,’ has died “Efua Dorkenoo, widely seen as the mother of the global movement to end female genital mutilation, has died after undergoing treatment for…More


Is There a Role for PPPs in Cancer Control?

This week, Harvard graduate and World Bank consultant Toni Kuguru writes on the role of Public-Private Partnerships in cancer control, focusing on resource-poor settings. Pan Africa Life Cancer Challenge 2014 In July, nearly 500 people ascended onto the grounds of the Nakuru Athletic Club to receive free cancer screening.  Spread across six counties in Kenya, this was the third of six free screenings conducted as part of the Pan Africa Life Cancer Challenge 2014.  While cancer is the third leading cause of death in Kenya only after infectious and cardiovascular diseases[1], routine cancer screening – a cost-effective preventative measure – is alarmingly low throughout the country.  Therefore to raise awareness of cancer and the importance of routine screening and early detection, Pan Africa Life has partnered with the Africa Cancer Foundation, Philips Healthcare and public, private, semi-private health providers to offer one day of free cancer screening in six counties. In three cancer screenings, a total of 1,820 men and women were screened for prostate, cervical and breast cancer. Patients waiting to be screened at the Nakuru Athletic Club Cancer in Kenya – a few facts The three most prevalent cancers are cervical, breast and prostate cancers and these three are responsible for almost a quarter of all cancer-related deaths[2].


Non-Communicable Disease: It’s Our Challenge, We Need Your Help.

This week, Alessandro covers the launch of a new campaign aiming to put a face and a narrative to the leading cause of global deaths – NCDs. Fresh from NCDFREE, this crowd-sourced, online community celebrates those living with and NCD, or affected by one. Fact: in 2013, three out of five global deaths resulted from an NCD. Fact: the true face of the global epidemic of NCDs is not an older, richer, American male – but likely to be under 70, living in poverty and probably living in Asia. Watch and share this short film to learn more


Making a Home for Hospitals in Global Health: The Global Hospitals Collaborative

I’ve lived a mostly healthy and illness-free life. Still, hospitals are at the center of many of my most important life experiences. I was born in a hospital (New York Hospital in Manhattan, where my mother also worked as a psychiatric resident)


The Disruption of the “See-And-Treat” Paradigm: Cervical Cancer Prevention in LMICs

550px-Latin_America_(orthographic_projection)

In recent years in global health, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), or “the vinegar test,” has widely been heralded as a simple and cost-effective cervical Read More


How Smartphones are changing dermatology in Tanzania

Flickr - whiteafrican

Situated in the Mara region of Tanzania, in the northwest between Lake Victoria and the Kenyan Border, the rural village of Shirati is home to Read More


PSI-Zimbabwe Says Cervical Cancer Screening Demand Up Among Women

Newsday: Demand for cervical cancer screening surges “A Population Services International-Zimbabwe (PSI) top official [on Monday] said demand for cervical cancer screening had surged over the past months as more and more women were now keen to know their health status…” (Nyela, 7/29).


Two Bone Marrow Transplant Patients Said To Be Cleared Of HIV

Bloomberg Businessweek: HIV Said Cleared in Two Bone Marrow Transplant Patients “Two cancer patients who were also infected with HIV went through bone marrow transplants and may no longer have the AIDS-causing virus, according to Australian doctors…” (Matsuyama/Bennett, 7/18).


WHO Warns More Action Needed To Address NCDs, Especially In Poorer Countries

News outlets report on a new WHO report showing a lack of national-level action and commitment to controlling non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Newsweek: Deaths From Cancer and Heart Disease Surge in Developing Countries, But Funding Hasn’t Caught Up “Noncommunicable diseases like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes killed 38 million people last year, most of them in…More


WHO call to scale up action on NCDs

WHO

As world leaders gather at the United Nations General Assembly to assess efforts made since 2011 in controlling noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease, the new WHO “Noncommunicable diseases country profiles 2014″ show progress has been insufficient and uneven. The report provides an updated overview of the NCD situation including recent trends and government responses in 194 countries. It reveals that:


A people’s movement against chronic disease

This week, in time for the UN NCD Review meeting in New York City, Dr. Jeremy Schwartz makes the case for a strong civil society movement against global Non-Communicable Diseases.   In some way or another, every one of us has been touched by a chronic disease. Words like hypertension, diabetes, and cancer are part of our everyday vocabulary. But most people I speak with believe that these diseases only affect people in rich countries- that these are not afflictions of the world’s poor.


What’s an NCD?

With the UN NCD Review this week in New York City, we recap on what Non-Communicable Diseases are… And why they matter. This week in New York City, all eyes in the Global Health community will be on the UN NCD Review. As the last three years have flashed by since the 2011 High-Level Meeting, now is the moment to take stock and reflect on the progress – and challenges – of tackling this growing epidemic. General Assembly resolution 66/2 of 19 September 2011, containing the Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases called for the convening of a comprehensive review and assessment in 2014 of the progress achieved in the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases. Forgotten what NCDs are


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