Cancer

Featured

Cardiovascular diseases wiki map

Deaths From Chronic Diseases Rising, Disproportionately Affecting Younger Populations In LMICs

New York Times: Chronic Diseases Are Killing More in Poorer Countries “Chronic diseases like cancer and heart disease are rising fast in low- and middle-income countries, striking far younger populations than in rich countries and causing much worse outcomes, according to a new report. Deaths from chronic diseases have risen by more than 50 percent…More

world tobacco rates wiki

Mass. Town Considers 1st Tobacco Ban in US

50 years after the US Surgeon General’s first report on the negative health effects of tobacco, the Associated Press reports that the small town of Read More

rwanda flag wiki

Rwanda Program Provides Lessons On Providing Cancer Care To Poor

Nature Reviews Cancer: Bringing cancer care to the poor: experiences from Rwanda Rwanda Health Minister Agnes Binagwaho, Lawrence Shulman of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and colleagues from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Rwandan Ministry of Health, and Partners in Health “…[T]he scientific yields of recent decades that have dramatically advanced oncology therapies and saved innumerable…More

Latest

Antibiotic Resistance Could Cause 10M Additional Annual Deaths, Cost $100T By 2050, British…

BBC News: Superbugs to kill ‘more than cancer’ by 2050 “Drug resistant infections will kill an extra 10 million people a year worldwide — more than currently die from cancer — by 2050 unless action is taken, a study says…” (Walsh, 12/10). Financial Times: Drug resistance to cost $100tn by 2050, study finds “Without global…More


Deaths From Chronic Diseases Rising, Disproportionately Affecting Younger Populations In LMICs

Cardiovascular diseases wiki map

New York Times: Chronic Diseases Are Killing More in Poorer Countries “Chronic diseases like cancer and heart disease are rising fast in low- and middle-income countries, striking far younger populations than in rich countries and causing much worse outcomes, according to a new report. Deaths from chronic diseases have risen by more than 50 percent…More


WHO Releases New Guidance On Cervical Cancer Prevention, Control

Agence France-Presse: WHO makes cervical cancer protection easier, cheaper “The World Health Organization introduced new cervical cancer guidelines Wednesday, making it easier and cheaper to protect women against one of the deadliest, but most preventable, diseases…” (12/3). VOA News: WHO Stresses Value of Vaccine in Preventing Cervical Cancer “…The World Health Organization said girls in…More


Cancer Survival Varies Widely Depending On Place Of Residence, Study Shows

NPR: Your Odds Of Surviving Cancer Depend Very Much On Where You Live “In the United States, nine out of 10 kids diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will live. In Jordan, the survival rate is 16 percent. And while cervical cancer patients have a five-year survival rate of over 70 percent in countries like Mauritius…More


Overweight, Obesity Responsible For Nearly 0.5M Cancer Cases In 2012, WHO Reports

Reuters: Fat to blame for half a million cancers a year, WHO agency says “…In a study published in the journal The Lancet Oncology, the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) said high body mass index (BMI) has now become a major cancer risk factor, responsible for some 3.6 percent, or 481,000, of…More


Mozambique Aims To Lower Cervical Cancer Rate With Screenings, HPV Vaccinations

VOA News: Mozambique Rolls Out Cervical Cancer Vaccines for School Girls “Mozambique has one of the world’s highest rates of cervical cancer, a disease that kills 4,000 women there every year. A new plan to vaccinate 10-year-old girls could turn the tide in the fight against a devastating illness that is widening an already gaping…More


Podcast Interview with Young Cancer Survivor and Advocate, Mexico City

This week, the latest in our series of podcasts from around the world. Sandro interviews Abish Romero, a young cancer survivor and advocate living and studying in Mexico City.  – http://blogs.plos.org/globalhealth/files/2014/10/Recording-10.mp3 Abish Romero is an MPH student at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico. She became a cancer advocate after being diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 24 years old. Her experience with the disease made her realize how important social protection is in developing countries; and how governments can strengthen health systems by improving the quality of multidisciplinary care and treatment. As she has seen, these actions are key in avoiding impoverishment in families caused by catastrophic expenditures. The post Podcast Interview with Young Cancer Survivor and Advocate, Mexico City appeared first on Translational Global Health.


Mass. Town Considers 1st Tobacco Ban in US

world tobacco rates wiki

50 years after the US Surgeon General’s first report on the negative health effects of tobacco, the Associated Press reports that the small town of Read More


News Outlets Examine Cervical Cancer Screening In Developing Countries

News outlets report on cervical cancer screening in developing countries. Inter Press Service: Mozambique Tackles its Twin Burden of Cervical Cancer and HIV “…Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among Mozambican women aged 15-44, says [Amir Modan of the United Nations Population Fund in Maputo]. Health authorities are tackling the problem through information campaigns…More


Rwanda Program Provides Lessons On Providing Cancer Care To Poor

rwanda flag wiki

Nature Reviews Cancer: Bringing cancer care to the poor: experiences from Rwanda Rwanda Health Minister Agnes Binagwaho, Lawrence Shulman of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and colleagues from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Rwandan Ministry of Health, and Partners in Health “…[T]he scientific yields of recent decades that have dramatically advanced oncology therapies and saved innumerable…More


The greatest health threat you’ve never heard of, but need to know about.

If you have a conversation with someone about the leading cause of global deaths, discussions will usually turn to Ebola, HIV or TB. Even more so, when we think of the biggest killers in the world’s poorer nations, we tend to think of infectious pandemics, under-nutrition or problems resulting from a lack of clean water and sanitation. At the same time, when we think of challenges like diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancers, we tend to think of lazy, aged populations living with too much, in rich communities. But in reality, both of these statements are completely false – and both insidious yet widespread myths have dire consequences on the health of our populations. This is where a new conversation around the facts becomes crucially important for Global Health.


Efua Dorkenoo, Pioneer To End FGM, Dies Of Cancer At Age 65

News outlets report on the death of women’s rights activist Efua Dorkenoo, who pioneered the movement to end female genital mutilation. The Guardian: Efua Dorkenoo OBE, the ‘incredible African female warrior,’ has died “Efua Dorkenoo, widely seen as the mother of the global movement to end female genital mutilation, has died after undergoing treatment for…More


Is There a Role for PPPs in Cancer Control?

This week, Harvard graduate and World Bank consultant Toni Kuguru writes on the role of Public-Private Partnerships in cancer control, focusing on resource-poor settings. Pan Africa Life Cancer Challenge 2014 In July, nearly 500 people ascended onto the grounds of the Nakuru Athletic Club to receive free cancer screening.  Spread across six counties in Kenya, this was the third of six free screenings conducted as part of the Pan Africa Life Cancer Challenge 2014.  While cancer is the third leading cause of death in Kenya only after infectious and cardiovascular diseases[1], routine cancer screening – a cost-effective preventative measure – is alarmingly low throughout the country.  Therefore to raise awareness of cancer and the importance of routine screening and early detection, Pan Africa Life has partnered with the Africa Cancer Foundation, Philips Healthcare and public, private, semi-private health providers to offer one day of free cancer screening in six counties. In three cancer screenings, a total of 1,820 men and women were screened for prostate, cervical and breast cancer. Patients waiting to be screened at the Nakuru Athletic Club Cancer in Kenya – a few facts The three most prevalent cancers are cervical, breast and prostate cancers and these three are responsible for almost a quarter of all cancer-related deaths[2].


Non-Communicable Disease: It’s Our Challenge, We Need Your Help.

This week, Alessandro covers the launch of a new campaign aiming to put a face and a narrative to the leading cause of global deaths – NCDs. Fresh from NCDFREE, this crowd-sourced, online community celebrates those living with and NCD, or affected by one. Fact: in 2013, three out of five global deaths resulted from an NCD. Fact: the true face of the global epidemic of NCDs is not an older, richer, American male – but likely to be under 70, living in poverty and probably living in Asia. Watch and share this short film to learn more


Older Posts »