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Sebastiana’s eyes: a reflection on providing care

After a long and warm clinic day seeing kids in one of the Mayan communities we work, I asked Yoli, our auxiliary nurse in charge Read More

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Sharing truths of terminal illness in rural Guatemala

Over the last four years I have visited communities in rural Guatemala with Wuqu’ Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance, a civil society organization providing health Read More

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Science, global health, and irrational health behaviors

Ed. Note: Sara Gorman will be joining us once a month to highlight different aspects of her forthcoming book on science denialism.  Have you ever Read More

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Life as the Only Doctor Atop Mexico’s Sierra Madre

Photos by Leslie Friday / Partners In HealthDr. Martha Arrieta (right) gives Marina López advice about how to care for her sick son, 3-year-old Wilmer Godínez, at a public clinic in Monterrey, Chiapas. Marina López held her 3-year-old son, Wilmer Godínez, snug in her lap. The boy’s spiky black hair and worried eyes peered out from the gray woven cloth in which he was wrapped. It was difficult to tell who was more nervous as the mother and son sat in Dr.


NCDs in humanitarian crisis

Sylvia Kehlenbrink graduated from medical school at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin in Berlin and completed her residency training in Social Internal Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. She has done clinical and translational research with the Global Diabetes Institute at Einstein College of Medicine focused on underserved populations in Uganda and India. In June 2015, she started her fellowship in Endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is also a fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative with the long-term goal of joining global efforts in addressing non-communicable diseases, esp.


Sebastiana’s eyes: a reflection on providing care

vista

After a long and warm clinic day seeing kids in one of the Mayan communities we work, I asked Yoli, our auxiliary nurse in charge Read More


World Breastfeeding Week: Conflicts of interest in infant and young child feeding

In the aftermath of World Breastfeeding Week, leading academics in infant nutrition from the Australian National University, Julie Smith, Libby Salmon and Phillip Baker, examine the challenges that remain in keeping breastfeeding on the global agenda. Cognitive losses from formula feeding cost the world economy $300 billion a year, according to a major study earlier this year.[1] Relatedly, a review of evidence on reproductive cancers calculates that 20,000 women a year – most in high income countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom – die of breast cancer avoidable by extending breastfeeding duration [2]. For children lack of breastfeeding also means increased risk of death, infectious disease, and chronic disease including asthma, obesity and type-2 diabetes. Infant and young child feeding matters for wealthy as well as poor countries. This year’s theme for  World Breastfeeding Week, ‘breastfeeding … the foundation of a country’s development’, [3] should remind governments in high income countries that aggressive infant formula marketing isn’t just a problem for deprived populations in faraway export markets


Indoor tanning: bringing the sun inside?

Throughout history, individuals have been harmed seeking to attain culturally desired attributes.


AIDS 2016: How Seattle scientists’ frustration turns to hope in hunt for an HIV vaccine

Editors note: As part of our coverage of the 21st International AIDS Conference, we are reposting part two of a series from the Seattle Times about the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s effort to find an effective HIV vaccine. View the full report here. By Nina Shapiro, Seattle Times staff reporter CAPE TOWN, South Africa


Cancer Patients In Uganda Face Late Diagnoses, Lack Of Treatment, IPS Reports

Inter Press Service: Uganda Ill-Equipped for Growing Cancer Burden “…While the East African country had huge success in the battle against the HIV virus in the 1990s, cervical and other cancers are the new health crises gripping the developing nation. One in 500 Ugandans suffers from cancer. But only five percent of patients will get…More


AIDS 2016: Fred Hutch’s quest to wipe out AIDS in South Africa

Editors note: As part of our coverage of the 21st International AIDS Conference, we are reposting part one of a series from the Seattle Times about the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s effort to find an effective HIV vaccine. View the full report here. By Nina Shapiro, Seattle Times staff reporter CAPE TOWN, South Africa


Cost Savings On Cancer Drug Could Enhance Colombian’s Right To Health, Long-Term Economic…

Huffington Post: Right To Health, Colombia And U.S. Congress Todd Howland, representative of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia “Recent memos allegedly leaked from the Colombian Embassy in Washington describe intense pressure by the pharmaceutical industry and its congressional allies to discourage Colombia’s efforts to half the local price of Novartis’ Gleevec,…More


Sharing truths of terminal illness in rural Guatemala

16064589354_10738fb05e_o

Over the last four years I have visited communities in rural Guatemala with Wuqu’ Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance, a civil society organization providing health Read More


Friday Think: closing the cervical cancer prevention gap

The Pap smear, colposcopy, biopsy. These are proven lifesavers that screen women for cervical cancer, but only for the women who can access them. For hundreds of millions of women in low and middle income countries, these technologies and treatment innovations (such as CryoPen and thermal coagulation) are expensive, hard to deliver, and often out […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesMy 30 years of hope, empowerment, and politics in reproductive healthMy family legacy: delivering health and equity across generationsSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunity ;


Appreciating Michael Elliott, a compassionate advocate for the most vulnerable

Michael Elliott was a dear friend, a wonderful colleague, and a tireless advocate for the world’s most vulnerable people. While we mourn his passing today, the world is a better place for his work in addressing poverty and inequities in all corners of the globe. Michael led with a clear vision for what the world could […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesMy family legacy: delivering health and equity across generationsSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunityFriday Think: closing the global cervical cancer prevention gap ;


What women want (in HIV protection)

What do women want? Worldwide, women want—and deserve—safe products that enable them to control and protect their own health, whatever their physical, social, or cultural needs. “That’s not just a nice thing to have, it’s a basic human right,” says Darin Zehrung, program advisor at PATH for vaccine and pharmaceutical delivery technologies, “and when it […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesSmall insects offer big nutrition and opportunityFriday Think: closing the global cervical cancer prevention gapMeet the superheroes fighting diarrheal disease ;


The risk of falling into poverty after developing heart disease: a survival analysis

Those with a low income are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease.


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