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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.

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Challenges to effective cancer control in China, India, and Russia

“Collectively, China, India, and Russia account for around 40% of the world’s population, experience 46% of all new cancers worldwide, and account for 52% of…

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W(h)ither Democracy; Latin American progress; China’s tobacco problem and poor world cancer;…

Should I be worried about how much I enjoy The Economist? I get some stick from colleagues, who reckons it is surreptitiously dripping neoliberal poison into my formerly socialist soul. But it’s just so good! On a good week, there are half a dozen must-read articles on development-related issues, wh…

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IHP news 267: Happy Easter!

Dear Colleagues, It’s Friday, so my coffee consumption is going through the roof. The Christians among you probably have other things to do this weekend, so we’ll keep this intro short. The atheists, agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and new agers among you will surely not mind. As for the “Socialist” who has his very own religion, global health, maybe this weekend is a good time to chant his planetary manifesto together with his beloved ones.   In this week’s guest editorial, Agnes Nanyonjo ( from the Malaria Consortium Uganda, and also an EV 2012) provides some of her impressions of the 2014 Geneva Health Forum, focusing mostly on day 1 of the three-day conference


CDC Foundation, George W. Bush Institute Partner To Address Global Cervical Cancer

“The CDC Foundation and the George W. Bush Institute [Wednesday] announced a new partnership to help stem the tide of cervical cancer in low- and middle-income countries based on a $3.6 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation,” according to a CDC Foundation press release. In an article written for the foundation’s blog,…More


2 HPV Vaccine Shots, Instead Of 3, Sufficient For Cancer Protection, WHO Says

The Guardian: Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO “Reaching a greater number of girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organization’s expert advisory group said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus…More


Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.


Challenges to effective cancer control in China, India, and Russia

china flag

“Collectively, China, India, and Russia account for around 40% of the world’s population, experience 46% of all new cancers worldwide, and account for 52% of…


Learning From HIV To Treat, Prevent HPV, Other Cancers

The Hill: HPV may be the new HIV Elizabeth Chabner Thompson, founder of BFFL Co. “In May, I will be traveling with a group of physicians to Botswana for a conference sponsored by the Ministry of Health and several other organizations in hopes to inspire discussion around cancer care in Botswana and to work toward…More


The Daily Impact: Emergency measures taken to prevent Ebola spread in West Africa

April 11, 2014 The historic ebola outbreak that started in Guinea continues as aid groups are taking emergency steps to prevent its spread. From AFP: The tropical bug is thought to have killed more than 110 people in Guinea and Liberia since January, with suspected cases reported in Mali and Sierra Leone and aid workers warning that vital hygiene products could run out. The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) announced emergency training for 70 people who would fan out across the Guinean capital Conakry to track people who have had close contact with Ebola patients. The UN agency is also setting up a special alert and response operation centre within the Guinean health ministry and training staff at Guinea’s main hospital and other health facilities. The organisation has described west Africa’s first Ebola outbreak as one of the most challenging since the virus emerged in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo


The Daily Impact: Sub-Saharan Africa off track to meet Sanitation MDG, says report

April 10, 2014 A new study finds that no sub-Saharan African country will meet the MDG for sanitation, and that many are lagging behind achieving the target for clean drinking water as well. From VOA: According to a joint report by the World Health Organization and UNICEF last year, more than 2 billion people – or one-third of the world’s population – will remain without access to improved sanitation by 2015.  The Millennium goal calls for cutting in half the number of people who lacked clean toileting facilities in 1990. A study led by British researchers found that none of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa was on track to meet the sanitation goal by next year. Last year’s WHO-UNICEF report noted that the world has met the target of cutting in half the proportion of people without access to improved sources of water, five years ahead of schedule.  But that assessment is deceptive, according to Mathew Freeman of Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta.  Freeman is co-author of the report by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He says it appears the global goal of increased access to clean drinking water is largely being met by emerging countries in Asia, which is obscuring the real picture of the availability of adequate water supplies elsewhere.


WHO calls for access to drugs for hepatitis C

New guidance on the diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis C worldwide strengthens the arm of campaigners who want pharmaceutical companies to slash the prices of new drugs that can cure most casesHepatitis C suddenly has a high profile after lurking in the shadows for so many years. This is thanks to Big Pharma, which has developed excellent new drugs that appear able to cure most people. It can cause liver cancer and cirrhosis and the prognosis for many in the poorer countries is death. Once a disease that caused doctors in poor countries to wring their hands, it is now a campaigning issue. The question now is who will get these drugs and how soon?The World Health Organisation has just weighed in with its first-ever guidance on the treatment of hepatitis C – no coincidence at all


Dr. Fidel Rubagumya Reflects on Cancer in Rwanda

Photo: Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners In HealthThe 150-bed Butaro Hospital in Rwanda represents the culmination of a partnership to strengthen service delivery at all levels of the district health system. The burden of cancer in low-income countries is staggering. More than two-thirds of all cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, according to the World Health Organization. In Rwanda, Partners In Health has worked closely with the Ministry of Health to devise and implement a strategic approach that ensures access to high-quality cancer care for any patient who needs it.