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Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation

Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation The Life Equation is a documentary about a impossible choices. When José meets Crecencia Buch, a Read More

What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHE

Mexican Doctor Studies at PIH University in Rwanda

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHEDr. Kurt Figueroa (right) and Nurse Sebishyimbo François (left) see patients for their oncology consultations at Butaro District Hospital in Rwanda. Dr. Kurt Figueroa is a student at the University of Global Health Equity, a Partners In Health institution that launched in 2015 and trains health professionals in Rwanda how to manage the challenges of providing health care in poor places.

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Let’s get political…

The ninth edition of the World Health Summit (WHS) was held during October 15th -17th, in a nice former cinema hall in the city of East Berlin, built in the early 1960s and with a rather appropriate name for the occasion, “Kosmos”.  This year, the event was attended by 2,000 participants from 100 countries, all aiming “to improve healthcare all over the world”. Well, at least, that’s the idea. Although I was a bit afraid this would be a “mini Davos-like” event, as described (arguably, by a biased observer)  in past editions, it was surprising and even encouraging to see a good demographic balance, with very young students and professionals, as well as senior high-profile researchers, decision-makers and CEOs from pharmaceutical companies, among other usual suspects. Even a royal member of the Kingdom of Jordan, Princess Dina Mired, actively participated as the President-Elect of the Union for International Cancer Control


Global challenges of health in the workplace

Over 54% of the world’s population live in urban areas, and over the next decade the growth of cities is expected to be greatest in Africa – the part of the world currently the least covered by workplace health. If we get this right, the potential to improve human wellbeing is vast. Evidence of the effectiveness of workplace health (or ‘wellness’) programmes is often unclear, and in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) the evidence is particularly thin. I have recently been investigating workplace health in LMICs* – desk research and a series of key informant interviews (India, China, South Africa, Brazil and Argentina) – and, while many of the challenges are problems for workplaces everywhere, they are often more acute in lower-income countries. A 2016 survey of 430 organisations found that the top three workplace-health issues globally are all related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs): poor nutrition, physical inactivity and stress.


NIH, Pharma Companies Launch 5-Year, $215M Partnership for Accelerating Cancer Therapies

CQ HealthBeat: NIH Launches Cancer Research Partnership with Drug Industry “The Trump administration on Thursday announced a cancer research partnership between the National Institutes of Health and 11 pharmaceutical companies, continuing an Obama-era program known as the ‘cancer moonshot’…” (Siddons, 10/12). The Hill: NIH, drug companies launch Cancer Moonshot partnership “…The National Institutes of Health…More


New Initiative Aims To Bring More Affordable Cancer Drugs To 6 African Countries

New York Times: As Cancer Tears Through Africa, Drug Makers Draw Up a Battle Plan “In a remarkable initiative modeled on the campaign against AIDS in Africa, two major pharmaceutical companies, working with the American Cancer Society, will steeply discount the prices of cancer medicines in Africa. Under the new agreement, the companies — Pfizer,…More


Sustained Political Commitment, Investments Critical To Cervical Cancer Prevention, Achieving…

See the original post: Sustained Political Commitment, Investments Critical To Cervical Cancer Prevention, Achieving…


More Must Be Done To Address Non-Communicable Diseases, WHO Warns In Progress Report

U.N. News Centre: ‘Window of opportunity’ closing on non-communicable diseases, warns U.N. health agency “Millions around the globe are dying prematurely from diseases such as cancer or heart disease, the United Nations health agency warned, urging governments to step up efforts to control non-communicable diseases (NCDs). … [T]he latest edition of the WHO Non-communicable Disease…More


The ABCs of cervical cancer prevention in remote locations

In 2014, DB Peru launched The Amazon Community-Based Participatory Cervical Cancer Prevention Programme as a collaborative approach to screening and treatment of cervical cancer in Lower Napo River (LNR) communities in the Peruvian Amazon. In the remote LNR, shaping a programme that addressed community needs, such as health literacy and improving access to healthcare, as well as ensuring a high level of clinical gynaecological care, was a challenge. In preparation, we collated a range of diverse resources from around the world. We gathered knowledge at international conferences, spoke to professionals at the coal-face of cancer prevention in low-resource settings, sourced donations from a range of companies, and collaborated with local government services. Most importantly, we worked beside communities to understand their needs, and shape local solutions to education, screening and treatment of cervical cancer.


Resources for Change

How to Apologize. I particularly like how the narrator uses her own mistake as an example. Ten questions to get to know your new direct reports better. Asking direct questions in [ read more brave ]


Managing overweight and obesity in children and young people

Why is excess weight a problem in children and young people? Currently too many children and adolescents across the world are already overweight or obese (i.e. too heavy for their age, height and sex). This is a concern because children with obesity are at a greater risk of developing a number of serious problems during childhood such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, joint and sleep complaints. Children with excess weight can also suffer from low self-esteem, stigmatization and mental health problems which can lead to reduced quality of life.


Vaccination remains the most cost-effective strategy to get on track with hepatitis B…

Midwife providing the 5-in-1 pentavalent vaccine (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis [DTP], hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenzae type b) during a routine vaccination session in Myanmar Dr. Rania Tohme, Team Lead, Global Immunization Division, CDC In the 1990s, the Western Pacific Region had one of the highest prevalence rates of chronic hepatitis B infection in the world (>8%). As a result, in 2005, it was the first World Health Organization (WHO) Region to adopt a hepatitis B control goal through vaccination. With the financial support of GAVI (the Vaccine Alliance), countries in the region introduced hepatitis B vaccine into routine immunization, starting with a birth dose followed by 2-3 additional doses.


The global war on tobacco is far from over

0000-0002-1767-4576We should be proud of our efforts in Australia, but we can’t become complacent as Big Tobacco continues to sell trillions of cigarettes globally, and other industries adopt their tactics. ONE could easily be mistaken for thinking the war on tobacco is coming to a close. Lighting up a cigarette mid-flight seems absurd to us now, but was common practice just a decade or two ago. We enjoy restaurant meals and afternoon coffees without the stench of toxic smoke and we can share a night out without having to wash our clothes, or endure a husky, sore throat the following morning. Australia now has one of the lowest smoking rates in the world, with 14.7% of adults aged 18 years and over smoking daily, down from 16.1% in 2011-12.


Can health ignite a political revolution?

Late last month, you could not ignore the chants of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn” to the tune of the White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nations Army’ as it echoed around the fields of Glastonbury. Regardless of your political affiliations, having hordes of young, passionate millennials singing the name of a political leader at a music festival is something which few would have predicted earlier that month. Why the change? – Could it be that young people in the UK feel a new sense of hope as they have been given a voice through health? Hope is something which has been on short supply in the UK of late


BIO Ventures For Global Health, Pharma Companies Launch Africa Access Initiative To Improve…

Devex: Q&A: How the African Access Initiative plans to mitigate Africa’s cancer burden “…BIO Ventures for Global Health joined with pharmaceutical companies [last] week to launch the African Access Initiative — a cancer-focused program that brings together oncology companies with African governments and hospitals to enhance health care capacity, foster cancer research, and increase the…More


Reuters Investigation Examines WHO Cancer Agency’s Review Of Glyphosate

Reuters: Cancer agency left in the dark over glyphosate evidence “The World Health Organization’s cancer agency says a common weedkiller is ‘probably carcinogenic.’ The scientist leading that review knew of fresh data showing no cancer link — but he never mentioned it and the agency did not take it into account…” (Kelland, 6/14).


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