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Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation

Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation The Life Equation is a documentary about a impossible choices. When José meets Crecencia Buch, a Read More

What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHE

Mexican Doctor Studies at PIH University in Rwanda

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHEDr. Kurt Figueroa (right) and Nurse Sebishyimbo François (left) see patients for their oncology consultations at Butaro District Hospital in Rwanda. Dr. Kurt Figueroa is a student at the University of Global Health Equity, a Partners In Health institution that launched in 2015 and trains health professionals in Rwanda how to manage the challenges of providing health care in poor places.

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World No Tobacco Day 2017

Dear Tobacco Industry Executives, We share a dream that this World No Tobacco Day will be a day like no other. Usually the focus of World No Tobacco Day is based on the fact that 7 million of your most loyal customers will die this year from tobacco use. There will be calls to raise the price of tobacco as this is the singular most important measure in reducing tobacco consumption. There will be calls to use some of these taxes to support smokers to quit by investing the funds in proven measures such as public education campaigns and quit lines. There will be calls to follow the lead of Australia, France, and the UK in implementing plain packaging to ban advertising of tobacco and to mandate smokefree environments.


“Appendix III” is critical for accelerating progress on NCDs

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 70% of global deaths in 2015, with three quarters of these deaths occurring in low and middle income countries (LMICs). NCDs are a silent epidemic of premature and preventable death and disability from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and mental and neurological disorders. Their main risk factors – unhealthy diets, alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity, and environmental determinants such as air pollution, are transmitted via unhealthy environments. They are directly and indirectly caused by commercial determinants, misaligned public policies in agriculture, commerce, education, energy, health, finance, trade, and social security, and are exacerbated by social determinants including poverty and inequity. In 2011, The United Nations General Assembly declared NCDs a global health and development challenge at a UN High-Level Summit.


New WHO policy briefs: common drivers and solutions to undernutrition and obesity

0000-0002-1767-4576This week the World Health Organization in Geneva released two new policy briefs focused on the double burden of malnutrition and double-duty actions for nutrition. The global double burden of malnutrition (WHO, 2017) Defined as the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight, obesity or diet-related NCDs, within individuals, households and populations, and across the life-course, the double burden of malnutrition now grips many nations worldwide and presents a challenging new nutrition paradigm for policy makers and public health. This first brief outlines the three scales (individual, household and population) and many determinants of the double burden. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, and action for cost-effective interventions and policies to address the double burden of malnutrition within the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition – and, through this, to contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals of ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG2) and ensuring healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages (SDG3). The three scales at which the double burden of malnutrition can manifest (WHO, 2017) The second complementary, standalone brief introduces and explains the concept of double-duty actions


CSIS Podcast Features Interview With Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon CEO Celina Schocken

Center for Strategic & International Studies’ “Take as Directed”: Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon and the Fight Against Cervical Cancer Janet Fleischman, senior associate with the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, interviews Celina Schocken, CEO of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, “an independent affiliate of the George W. Bush Institute that focuses on cervical and breast cancer…More


New Treatment Guidelines, Developments In Technology Can Help Sub-Saharan African Countries…

Scientific American: Helping Cancer’s Forgotten Victims Sally Cowal, senior vice president of global cancer control at the American Cancer Society, and Jennifer Ryan Crozier, IBM’s vice president of corporate citizenship and president of the IBM International Foundation “…[During a meeting that took place in Nairobi last month, for] the first time, cancer treatment guidelines were…More


Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation

Q&A with Rob Tinworth, director of The Life Equation The Life Equation is a documentary about a impossible choices. When José meets Crecencia Buch, a Read More


WHO Examining Ways To Reduce Global Drug Prices, Improve Access To Treatments

Intellectual Property Watch: WHO Members Urged To Support Resolution Delinking Cancer Drug Prices From R&D Costs “A group of civil society organizations and health experts have sent a letter to delegates to this month’s annual World Health Assembly urging support for a study on the delinkage of the costs of research and development from the…More


Seven connections we need to make to fix the food system

I spent this past Saturday at the 2017 Oxford Food Forum, a conference organised by Oxford University students. It was laudable to see a dedicated crowd come to spend their Saturday talking about something apparently abstract – building connections in the food system (the conference theme was “Breaking Down the Silos”). But the relatively abstract nature of theme was precisely why I was so keen to go. Because in practice, connections are not abstract at all.


WHO Releases 10-Year Review Report Chapters Focusing On NCDs, Universal Coverage, Global Health…

WHO: Noncommunicable diseases: the slow motion disaster This chapter of the WHO’s “Ten years in public health 2007-2017” report focuses on “the rise of chronic noncommunicable diseases. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases, once linked only to affluent societies, are now global, and the poor suffer the most. These diseases share four risk…More


Controversies about cervical cancer screening: A qualitative study of Roma women

Publication date: June 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 183 Author(s): Trude Andreassen, Elisabete Weiderpass, Florian Nicula, Ofelia Suteu, Andreea Itu, Minodora Bumbu, Aida Tincu, Giske Ursin, Kåre Moen Romania has Europe’s highest incidence and mortality of cervical cancer.


‘Practical’ Approach To Addressing Cancer In Latin America Should Include Early Detection…

The Hill: Proposing a pragmatic approach to decrease cancer in Latin America Nancy Brinker, founder of Susan G. Komen, and Eric T. Rosenthal, founder of the National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers Public Affairs Network “…Most Latin American nations do not have widespread, effective cancer screening initiatives for asymptomatic healthy individuals that would use, for example,…More


New hepatitis data highlight need for urgent global response

New WHO data reveal that an estimated 325 million people worldwide are living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The WHO Global hepatitis report, 2017 indicates that the large majority of these people lack access to life-saving testing and treatment. As a result, millions of people are at risk of a slow progression to chronic liver disease, cancer, and death.


New Analysis Examines West Africa’s 2013-2016 Ebola Epidemic, Calls For Real-Time Sequencing,…

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center: A big-picture look at the world’s worst Ebola epidemic Mary Engel, staff writer at Fred Hutch, discusses an analysis published in Nature on the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, writing, “An international effort to analyze the entire database of Ebola virus genomes from the 2013-2016 West African epidemic reveals…More


Published Data On Childhood Cancers Shows 13% Increase In Incidence Worldwide Since 1980s, WHO…

The Guardian: Recorded childhood cancers rise by 13% worldwide, study finds “Childhood cancers have risen across the globe by 13 percent over 20 years, according to data from the World Health Organization’s cancer section. Cancer in children is comparatively rare; when it does occur it is more likely to have been triggered by something in…More


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