Cardiovascular

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“Access to information literally saves lives”: free access to UpToDate in LMICs

This week, Yannis Valtis joined us for a short conversation about a new paper he and colleagues recently published in BMJ Global Health. Their study Read More

Why the World Can’t Wait for Universal Preschool

As a pediatric resident I spend a lot of time with preschool-aged children in the hospital or at clinic. I have the privilege of watching Read More

“A reflexive, relentless interrogation of common sense”: Emily Yates-Doerr on anthropology, global health, and obesity

Emily Yates-Doerr is a Veni Laureate and assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. She currently is studying a United Nations initiative to improve Read More

Latest

Impact Of NCDs Growing, Response Lagging

Undark: The Growing Urgency of Killer Chronic Diseases “Chronic diseases — a term that primarily refers to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease — are responsible for 88 percent of all U.S. deaths and 70 percent of all deaths worldwide per year, according to the World Health Organization. Yet they receive far less…More


With $225M In Funding From Bloomberg, CZI, Gates Foundation, Former CDC Director Tom Frieden…

CQ HealthBeat: Former CDC Director to Lead Global Cardiovascular Initiative “Thomas Frieden, the former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will lead a $225 million initiative aimed at reducing deaths caused by cardiovascular disease, he announced on Tuesday. … While most of the organization’s resources would be devoted to cardiovascular disease, Frieden…More


Resolve Initiative Aims To Save 100M Lives By Reducing Global Burden Of Cardiovascular Disease,…

The Lancet: Saving an additional 100 million lives Thomas R. Frieden, president and CEO of Resolve, and Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP & Bloomberg Philanthropies “…Despite being the leading cause of mortality and premature death, cardiovascular disease is largely preventable through simple, inexpensive, but underused actions. … Building on the recently released WHO…More


Taking the pulse of heart disease

On Saturday 26 – Wednesday 30 August, the world’s largest cardiovascular congress will take place In Barcelona, Spain. The ESC congress will convene global experts and present advancements in cardiovascular medicine worldwide. To bring us up to speed on all thing cardiovascular health, Dr Anna Beale ‘takes the pulse’ of heart disease in this piece.   In 2017, healthcare spending continues to rise globally. Total health expenditure as a percentage of total GDP increased from 8.5% in 1995 to 9.8% in 2014


Measuring the double burden of air pollution

On a recent trip to China to collect data on air pollution as part of the China Kadoorie Biobank prospective cohort study, Ka Hung Chan was struck by the limitations of available personal exposure collection and monitoring devices. Without improved devices and data, we won’t clear the air on pollution in heavily burdened LMICs – and generate much needed political attention and investment in prevention.   In the latest Global Burden of Disease study, ambient and household air pollution* were together ranked the 4th leading risk factors of disease burden (after dietary risks, tobacco smoke and high blood pressure), accounting for 6.5 million premature deaths in 2015. Up to 90% of these deaths occurred in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs), many of which are undergoing industrialisation and suffering from ever-worsening ambient air pollution (AAP), as well as unresolved household air pollution (HAP) from domestic solid fuel use – this is the  ‘double burden of air pollution’.   Available evidence While AAP has been rising on the global public health agenda in recent years, early epidemiological investigations begun after the infamous 1952 London smog event


PLOS Medicine Special Issue: Cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity

The editors of PLOS Medicine together with guest editors Carolyn S. P. Lam, Kazem Rahimi, and Steven Steinhubl are delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue focused on cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Research submissions are


Chronic kidney disease and the global NCD agenda

2017 is an important year for the international nephrology community. March 9 was World Kidney Day, the theme this year being ‘Kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyles for healthy kidneys’, highlighting the crucial link between the kidneys and metabolic and cardiovascular health. In April, the Global Kidney Health Atlas, one of the largest health-related country capacity reviews in history, was launched at the World Congress of Nephrology in Mexico City. The Atlas, a first for the nephrology community, is a multinational cross-sectional survey designed to assess need and capacity for kidney care worldwide and provide the foundation for a global surveillance network for chronic kidney disease (CKD) care.


New WHO policy briefs: common drivers and solutions to undernutrition and obesity

0000-0002-1767-4576This week the World Health Organization in Geneva released two new policy briefs focused on the double burden of malnutrition and double-duty actions for nutrition. The global double burden of malnutrition (WHO, 2017) Defined as the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight, obesity or diet-related NCDs, within individuals, households and populations, and across the life-course, the double burden of malnutrition now grips many nations worldwide and presents a challenging new nutrition paradigm for policy makers and public health. This first brief outlines the three scales (individual, household and population) and many determinants of the double burden. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, and action for cost-effective interventions and policies to address the double burden of malnutrition within the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition – and, through this, to contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals of ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG2) and ensuring healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages (SDG3). The three scales at which the double burden of malnutrition can manifest (WHO, 2017) The second complementary, standalone brief introduces and explains the concept of double-duty actions


Global mortality variations in patients with heart failure

Marked regional differences in mortality in patients with heart failure persisted after multivariable adjustment for cardiac and non-cardiac factors. Therefore, variations in mortality between regions could be the result of health-care infrastructure, quality and access, or environmental and genetic factors. Further studies in large, global cohorts are needed.


Intersectionality and risk for ischemic heart disease in Sweden: Categorical and…

Publication date: March 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 177 Author(s): Maria Wemrell, Shai Mulinari, Juan Merlo Intersectionality theory can contribute to epidemiology and public health by furthering understanding of power dynamics driving production of health disparities, and increasing knowledge about heterogeneities within, and overlap between, social categories.


Innovation, Partnerships, Political Will Crucial For Continuing Progress Against Infectious…

New Dawn Liberia: Confronting the Next Global Health Challenge Jörg Reinhardt, chair of the Novartis Board of Directors “…[W]hile mortality rates from infectious diseases are declining, developed countries’ sedentary lifestyles, tobacco use, and poor diets are catching on in the developing world, and [noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)] such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are increasing…More


The Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease Health in Older Women (OPACH) Study

Limited evidence exists to inform physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior guidelines for older people, especially women.


Early-life and adult socioeconomic determinants of myocardial infarction incidence and fatality

Publication date: March 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 177 Author(s): Fanny Kilpi, Karri Silventoinen, Hanna Konttinen, Pekka Martikainen Social inequalities in coronary heart disease mortality have roots in childhood conditions, but it is unknown whether they are associated both with the incidence of the disease and the following survival.


WHO Recommends People Become More Active To Help Prevent NCDs

U.N. News Centre: With more people sedentary, U.N. health agency urges everyone to get moving “Not enough exercise contributes to cancer, diabetes, depression, and other non-communicable diseases, according to the United Nations health agency, which is urging people to get up and get active. … WHO’s Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of…More


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