Chronic respiratory

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“Access to information literally saves lives”: free access to UpToDate in LMICs

This week, Yannis Valtis joined us for a short conversation about a new paper he and colleagues recently published in BMJ Global Health. Their study Read More

Tobacco Tax: A Win-win Measure for Public Health

Tobacco kills half of its users. What if I told you that the most effective tool to reduce tobacco use can also generate millions annually Read More

Beijing Implements Strict New Smoking Ban

Bloomberg Business: Beijing’s About to Roll Out Its Harshest Smoking Ban Ever “Starting on June 1 in Beijing a blanket ban will be imposed on smoking in public places, after the city’s Municipal People’s Congress passed the tough new law in November…” (Roberts, 5/29). CNN: Beijing rolls out China’s toughest smoking ban…but will it work?…More

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Acute respiratory and cardiovascular health effects of an air pollution event, January 2013,…

Air pollution in China has been getting worse over the last 50 years, resulting in more severe haze (smog) days in cities, especially those in heavily-developed eastern China.


Prevalence of chest symptoms amongst brick kiln migrant workers and care seeking behaviour: a…

Background Early detection and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) have been key principles of TB control.


Strengthening the delivery of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care at primary…

Background: Respiratory diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), account for one-fourth of the patients at the primary health-care (PHC) facilities in Pakistan.


Tobacco Tax: A Win-win Measure for Public Health

Tobacco kills half of its users. What if I told you that the most effective tool to reduce tobacco use can also generate millions annually Read More


Beijing Implements Strict New Smoking Ban

Bloomberg Business: Beijing’s About to Roll Out Its Harshest Smoking Ban Ever “Starting on June 1 in Beijing a blanket ban will be imposed on smoking in public places, after the city’s Municipal People’s Congress passed the tough new law in November…” (Roberts, 5/29). CNN: Beijing rolls out China’s toughest smoking ban…but will it work?…More


Emerging doctors call for action on global epidemic: non-communicable disease

This week, special guest-bloggers and Australian doctors-in-training, Rebecca Kelly and Tim Martin of the Australian Medical Students’ Association, call for greater focus, discussion and action on the world’s leading causes of death. In March this year, the Australian government released the 2015 Intergenerational report revealing a prediction of the economic and social trends over the next 40 years. There’s some fantastic news; children born in the middle of this century are projected to live greater than 95 years. Importantly, this increase in life expectancy will involve an improved quality of life and Australians will be more prosperous in real terms. However, the report comes with a warning.


Non Communicable Diseases – A Silent Killer

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent 46% of the global burden of disease and cause 63% of all deaths in the world, equal to 36 million people per year. Annually nine million people die prematurely before the age of 60 as a result of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). People from developing countries suffer the most: 90% of people who die before the age of 60 are from middle and low-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that without prevention, 52 million people will die because of NCDs by 2030. As is the case in all developing countries, Uganda is experiencing important changes in disease patterns.


South Africa’s quadruple burden of disease

This week, Pooja Yerramilli returns to explore NCDs and the quadruple burden as barriers to economic and social development with Sandhya Singh – Director of Disease, Disability, and Geriatrics within South Africa’s Department of Health. Three years ago, I found myself on a bus in South Africa, with fifteen of my college classmates. We were on our way to Kruger National Park, after a week of volunteering and researching in Cape Town. As I stared out the window, appreciating rural South Africa’s beauty, a large billboard, seemingly in the middle of nowhere, caught my attention.


India Should Focus On Environmental Sustainability, Greener Growth, Sanitation To Solve Air…

Foreign Policy: Harder to Breathe Ira Triveldi, Indian novelist, yoga teacher, entrepreneur, and speaker “…Air pollution is an urgent public health crisis. More people in India die of chronic respiratory diseases and asthma than in any other nation in the world. … India’s environmental crisis is not just endangering human lives, but is also holding…More


Prevalence of COPD and associated risk factors in rural Uganda

In this rural district of Uganda, COPD starts early in life. Major risk factors were biomass smoke for both sexes and tobacco smoke for men. In addition to high smoking prevalence in men, biomass smoke could be a major health threat to men and women in rural areas of Uganda.


Global Alliance For Clean Cookstoves Partners: Pledge $413M

Media sources report on pledges made during the Cookstoves Future Summit that took place in New York last week. Devex: Partners pledge $413M for clean cookstoves “…[T]he Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves seeks to deliver clean cookstoves to 100 million people by 2020, and at the recent Cookstoves for Future Summit in New York the…More


Mass. Town Considers 1st Tobacco Ban in US

50 years after the US Surgeon General’s first report on the negative health effects of tobacco, the Associated Press reports that the small town of Read More


Air quality deteriorating in many of the world’s cities

7 May 2014 — Air quality in most cities worldwide that monitor outdoor (ambient) air pollution fails to meet WHO guidelines for safe levels, putting people at additional risk of respiratory disease and other health problems.


IHP news 252: Back to work

Dear Colleagues,  Happy New Year to all of you, first of all! Hope you enjoyed the festivities and some “quality time” with your families – yes, that’s the first neoliberal concept I use in this new year, and it won’t be the last, I’m afraid. In case you don’t have a family (yet), I hope you did all you’re not allowed to do as public health people on New Year’s Eve. If you are back at work by now,  you probably still feel a bit rusty, like myself. So in this first IHP newsletter of the year, we won’t come up with “top 10 stories of 2013” etc.


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