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Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHE

Mexican Doctor Studies at PIH University in Rwanda

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHEDr. Kurt Figueroa (right) and Nurse Sebishyimbo François (left) see patients for their oncology consultations at Butaro District Hospital in Rwanda. Dr. Kurt Figueroa is a student at the University of Global Health Equity, a Partners In Health institution that launched in 2015 and trains health professionals in Rwanda how to manage the challenges of providing health care in poor places.

The People Behind the Numbers: Diabetes Lessons from Guatemala

This entry was originally posted at Global Health Now. It’s easy to become numbed by the global diabetes epidemic. Almost every week, it seems, new numbers are released Read More

Sharing truths of terminal illness in rural Guatemala

Over the last four years I have visited communities in rural Guatemala with Wuqu’ Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance, a civil society organization providing health Read More

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Happy Valentine’s Day: Fecundability and Sugar Sweetened Soda

Thinking about ordering a soda to go with your fancy dinner and dozen roses tonight? Think again… With sugar consumption rising throughout the developed (and developing) world, it seems that each new day brings with it a new study that illuminates a previously unknown link between sugar-heavy diets and chronic diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Now, just in time for Valentine’s Day, researchers from Boston University’s Pregnancy Study Online (PRESTO) have published a paper in Epidemiology showing that the intake of one or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day—by either partner—is associated with a decreased chance of getting pregnant. “We found positive associations between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and lower fertility, which were consistent after controlling for many other factors, including obesity, caffeine intake, alcohol, smoking, and overall diet quality,” says lead author Elizabeth Hatch, professor of epidemiology.


Taxes On Sugary Beverages Becoming More Common Globally; Experts Warn Taxes Are Not Silver…

Malnutrition Deeply: Taxing the World Out of Obesity “…Taxes on sugar sweetened beverages have quickly become the most prominent strategy in the global push to reduce overweight and obesity, as well as linked noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that include diabetes and cardiovascular disease. … Taxes on sugary drinks have been endorsed by the World Health Organization…More


WHO Supports South Africa’s Decision To Pass Law Taxing Sugary Drinks

WHO: WHO commends South African parliament decision to pass tax bill on sugary drinks “The South African Parliament has taken a brave and powerful step towards promoting the health of the country’s citizens and reducing diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes, by passing a bill [on Tuesday] to implement a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages,…More


Countries Implementing Policies, Taking Actions To Force Companies To Reduce Sugar, Salt, Fat…

Financial Times: Manufacturers respond to health edicts in food and drink recipes “…President Maithripala Sirisena of Sri Lanka marked World Diabetes Day in November by joining a walk in the capital city of Colombo, as he has for the past eight years. This time, however, the country’s president did something unusual. During a speech, he…More


Policymakers Must Help Nations Provide Access To NCD Care For Newly Arrived Refugees

Foreign Affairs: The Hidden Refugee Health Crisis Jude Alawa, student at Yale University “…[M]illions of refugees [are] suffering from chronic non-communicable diseases — maladies such as diabetes, cancer, and mental illness that cannot pass from person to person but can be devastating if left untreated. As host countries have taken in the world’s displaced, they…More


Greater Access To Diabetes Prevention, Treatment Needed, Especially Among Women, U.N. Says On…

U.N. News Centre: Promote affordable, equitable access to diabetes medicines and information for women, U.N. urges “On World Diabetes Day, the United Nations health agency has said that women — especially those in low-income countries — are particularly vulnerable to diabetes, a condition that can be prevented or delayed with medication, regular screening, and healthier…More


Beyond the stereotype: the many faces of malnutrition in contemporary Tanzania

A starving, emaciated child: this is the image that usually comes to most people’s mind when they think of malnutrition in Africa. However, what is less portrayed is a far more common form of undernutrition with life-long consequences that is not immediately visible to the human eye, a so-called hidden hunger known as chronic malnutrition or stunting. Chronically malnourished children are usually not thinner than other children, and they do not look undernourished. But they are shorter than their peers and therefore referred to as stunted. Although genetic differences and environmental factors also cause differences in population height potential, in some communities, stunting is so common that it is hard to know what is ‘normal’ and what is not.


Increasing Availability Of Essential Medicines Critical To Global Health Security

Project Syndicate: How to Boost Access to Essential Medicines Justus Haucap, professor of economics at Heinrich-Heine University “…[L]ow- and middle-income countries … need help improving drug delivery and managing chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes, which impose an immense burden on their economies. … Unfortunately, the WHO’s leadership, like much of the West, ……More


Impact Of NCDs Growing, Response Lagging

Undark: The Growing Urgency of Killer Chronic Diseases “Chronic diseases — a term that primarily refers to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease — are responsible for 88 percent of all U.S. deaths and 70 percent of all deaths worldwide per year, according to the World Health Organization. Yet they receive far less…More


We all have to die of something, so why bother being healthy?

0000-0002-1767-4576It’s 6:45 on a cold and rainy Tuesday morning. The alarm blares. As you begin to wake and wonder how it could possibly be morning already, your good intentions dawn on you. It’s run morning – and it’s the last thing you want to do.


Governments Endorse Plan To Address NCDs As Development Priority At WHO-Backed Conference

U.N. News Centre: Governments endorse U.N.-backed plan to tackle cancer, diabetes, and other deadly diseases “Global leaders have pledged to take bold action to reduce suffering from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which include the world’s leading killers — heart and lung diseases, cancers, and diabetes — the United Nations health agency has reported. Governments on Wednesday…More


Incidence Of Obesity, Diabetes Increasing In African Nations, Report Shows

The Guardian: Supermarkets are creating an obesity crisis in African countries, experts warn “Changing dietary habits are creating an obesity crisis in African countries as middle-class people buy their food from supermarkets rather than eating food they grow, a group of international food security experts has warned. A report by the Malabo Montpellier Panel, a…More


Western Fast Food Industry Contributing To Growing Obesity, Diabetes Cases In Ghana, Raising…

New York Times: Obesity Was Rising as Ghana Embraced Fast Food. Then Came KFC “…KFC’s presence in Ghana so far is relatively modest but rapidly growing, and it underscores the way fast food can shape palates, habits, and waistlines. Research shows that people who eat more fast food are more likely to gain weight and…More


Taking the pulse of heart disease

On Saturday 26 – Wednesday 30 August, the world’s largest cardiovascular congress will take place In Barcelona, Spain. The ESC congress will convene global experts and present advancements in cardiovascular medicine worldwide. To bring us up to speed on all thing cardiovascular health, Dr Anna Beale ‘takes the pulse’ of heart disease in this piece.   In 2017, healthcare spending continues to rise globally. Total health expenditure as a percentage of total GDP increased from 8.5% in 1995 to 9.8% in 2014


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