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Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHE

Mexican Doctor Studies at PIH University in Rwanda

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHEDr. Kurt Figueroa (right) and Nurse Sebishyimbo François (left) see patients for their oncology consultations at Butaro District Hospital in Rwanda. Dr. Kurt Figueroa is a student at the University of Global Health Equity, a Partners In Health institution that launched in 2015 and trains health professionals in Rwanda how to manage the challenges of providing health care in poor places.

The People Behind the Numbers: Diabetes Lessons from Guatemala

This entry was originally posted at Global Health Now. It’s easy to become numbed by the global diabetes epidemic. Almost every week, it seems, new numbers are released Read More

Sharing truths of terminal illness in rural Guatemala

Over the last four years I have visited communities in rural Guatemala with Wuqu’ Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance, a civil society organization providing health Read More

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Managing overweight and obesity in children and young people

Why is excess weight a problem in children and young people? Currently too many children and adolescents across the world are already overweight or obese (i.e. too heavy for their age, height and sex). This is a concern because children with obesity are at a greater risk of developing a number of serious problems during childhood such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, joint and sleep complaints. Children with excess weight can also suffer from low self-esteem, stigmatization and mental health problems which can lead to reduced quality of life.


August 2017 Issue Of WHO Bulletin Available Online

WHO: Bulletin of the World Health Organization The August 2017 WHO Bulletin includes editorials, news, and research and policy articles on various issues, including care and testing for tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, diabetes, and malaria (August 2017).


Chronic kidney disease and the global NCD agenda

2017 is an important year for the international nephrology community. March 9 was World Kidney Day, the theme this year being ‘Kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyles for healthy kidneys’, highlighting the crucial link between the kidneys and metabolic and cardiovascular health. In April, the Global Kidney Health Atlas, one of the largest health-related country capacity reviews in history, was launched at the World Congress of Nephrology in Mexico City. The Atlas, a first for the nephrology community, is a multinational cross-sectional survey designed to assess need and capacity for kidney care worldwide and provide the foundation for a global surveillance network for chronic kidney disease (CKD) care.


Can health ignite a political revolution?

Late last month, you could not ignore the chants of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn” to the tune of the White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nations Army’ as it echoed around the fields of Glastonbury. Regardless of your political affiliations, having hordes of young, passionate millennials singing the name of a political leader at a music festival is something which few would have predicted earlier that month. Why the change? – Could it be that young people in the UK feel a new sense of hope as they have been given a voice through health? Hope is something which has been on short supply in the UK of late


The secret, hidden pricetag on your cola bottle

0000-0002-1767-4576The line at the convenience store is three people deep. Standing in front of me is a 40-something man with a bottle of cola and a newspaper. In front of him, a mother paying her utility bill accompanied by her young daughter. The mum and child leave, and the man moves forward to pay. “Two dollars?” I overhear him exclaim with surprise… “I remember when a bottle of cola was one!” As he pays and heads for the door, I too grab a newspaper and cannot help but notice the story on the front cover: the mounting crisis of costs from an obesity epidemic gripping not just the nation, but the planet – the economic and health systems already struggling to keep pace.


“Appendix III” is critical for accelerating progress on NCDs

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 70% of global deaths in 2015, with three quarters of these deaths occurring in low and middle income countries (LMICs). NCDs are a silent epidemic of premature and preventable death and disability from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and mental and neurological disorders. Their main risk factors – unhealthy diets, alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity, and environmental determinants such as air pollution, are transmitted via unhealthy environments. They are directly and indirectly caused by commercial determinants, misaligned public policies in agriculture, commerce, education, energy, health, finance, trade, and social security, and are exacerbated by social determinants including poverty and inequity. In 2011, The United Nations General Assembly declared NCDs a global health and development challenge at a UN High-Level Summit.


New WHO policy briefs: common drivers and solutions to undernutrition and obesity

0000-0002-1767-4576This week the World Health Organization in Geneva released two new policy briefs focused on the double burden of malnutrition and double-duty actions for nutrition. The global double burden of malnutrition (WHO, 2017) Defined as the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight, obesity or diet-related NCDs, within individuals, households and populations, and across the life-course, the double burden of malnutrition now grips many nations worldwide and presents a challenging new nutrition paradigm for policy makers and public health. This first brief outlines the three scales (individual, household and population) and many determinants of the double burden. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, and action for cost-effective interventions and policies to address the double burden of malnutrition within the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition – and, through this, to contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals of ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG2) and ensuring healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages (SDG3). The three scales at which the double burden of malnutrition can manifest (WHO, 2017) The second complementary, standalone brief introduces and explains the concept of double-duty actions


Contextualising renal patient routines: Everyday space-time contexts, health service access

Publication date: June 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 183 Author(s): Julia McQuoid, Tanisha Jowsey, Girish Talaulikar Stable routines are key to successful illness self-management for the growing number of people living with chronic illness around the world.


WHO Releases 10-Year Review Report Chapters Focusing On NCDs, Universal Coverage, Global Health…

WHO: Noncommunicable diseases: the slow motion disaster This chapter of the WHO’s “Ten years in public health 2007-2017” report focuses on “the rise of chronic noncommunicable diseases. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases, once linked only to affluent societies, are now global, and the poor suffer the most. These diseases share four risk…More


Water security: the key ingredient for soda tax success

Recommended by the World Health Organization, sugar-sweetened beverage taxes have become an attractive policy to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). However, in contexts where water safety and security are equally important issues, there is an imperative need to simultaneously promote water sanitation and access policies to ensure the benefits of a soda tax don’t dry up.  Soda consumption is often high in countries where access to free drinking water is limited. For over half the global population, water insecurity is a daily reality, and so too is the double burden of malnutrition.


Pacifique Ntirenganya: A Passionate Global Health Leader

Photo by Rebecca E. Rollins / Partners In HealthNtirenganya in Harper, Liberia, in November 2016. Wearing a white shirt and glasses, Remy Pacifique Ntirenganya smiled into a computer screen while calling a colleague in Boston over Skype. He moved around a room of colorful wall hangings, trying to get a better signal in a staff house outside Rwinkwavu Hospital, a public facility Partners In Health supports in Rwanda. The call was squeezed between his evening jog and a visit to a warehouse to check medical supplies


Flood Survivors Receive Medical Attention in Peru

Photo Courtesy of Socios En SaludDr. Leonid Lecca (in vest), executive director of PIH in Peru, helps EMTs place 60-year-old Maria Vergara in an ambulance near Rinconada. Heavy rains have subsided throughout most of Lima, Peru, during the tail end of one of the most destructive rainy seasons in decades. In the northern slum of Carabayllo, residents of the flooded Chillon River are beginning to return home.


Global health in 2017

I don’t know about you, but I am still in that weird part of the dawning year where writing the date seems like I am playing main stage in a Hollywood ‘sci-fi’ movie. Where the four numbers of 2 – 0 – 1 – 7 seem more of something I would associate with flying cars and robot servants, than the ‘here and now’. But strange as it may seem we are well into the New Year and as the pace of the world reflects the pace of passing time, I can’t help but wonder if we actually do live in the future. So to speak. We now call for a cab via west coast America using a democratized application on a globally connected device no bigger than our palm, manufactured on another continent and possessing the technological potency we could never have even dreamt of just a decade ago – linked to another billion similar devices through millions of miles of fibre-optics spanning the entire planet


Innovation, Partnerships, Political Will Crucial For Continuing Progress Against Infectious…

New Dawn Liberia: Confronting the Next Global Health Challenge Jörg Reinhardt, chair of the Novartis Board of Directors “…[W]hile mortality rates from infectious diseases are declining, developed countries’ sedentary lifestyles, tobacco use, and poor diets are catching on in the developing world, and [noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)] such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are increasing…More


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