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Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHE

Mexican Doctor Studies at PIH University in Rwanda

Photo by / Zacharias Abubeker for UGHEDr. Kurt Figueroa (right) and Nurse Sebishyimbo François (left) see patients for their oncology consultations at Butaro District Hospital in Rwanda. Dr. Kurt Figueroa is a student at the University of Global Health Equity, a Partners In Health institution that launched in 2015 and trains health professionals in Rwanda how to manage the challenges of providing health care in poor places.

The People Behind the Numbers: Diabetes Lessons from Guatemala

This entry was originally posted at Global Health Now. It’s easy to become numbed by the global diabetes epidemic. Almost every week, it seems, new numbers are released Read More

Sharing truths of terminal illness in rural Guatemala

Over the last four years I have visited communities in rural Guatemala with Wuqu’ Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance, a civil society organization providing health Read More

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Greater Access To Diabetes Prevention, Treatment Needed, Especially Among Women, U.N. Says On…

U.N. News Centre: Promote affordable, equitable access to diabetes medicines and information for women, U.N. urges “On World Diabetes Day, the United Nations health agency has said that women — especially those in low-income countries — are particularly vulnerable to diabetes, a condition that can be prevented or delayed with medication, regular screening, and healthier…More


Increasing Availability Of Essential Medicines Critical To Global Health Security

Project Syndicate: How to Boost Access to Essential Medicines Justus Haucap, professor of economics at Heinrich-Heine University “…[L]ow- and middle-income countries … need help improving drug delivery and managing chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes, which impose an immense burden on their economies. … Unfortunately, the WHO’s leadership, like much of the West, ……More


Impact Of NCDs Growing, Response Lagging

Undark: The Growing Urgency of Killer Chronic Diseases “Chronic diseases — a term that primarily refers to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease — are responsible for 88 percent of all U.S. deaths and 70 percent of all deaths worldwide per year, according to the World Health Organization. Yet they receive far less…More


We all have to die of something, so why bother being healthy?

0000-0002-1767-4576It’s 6:45 on a cold and rainy Tuesday morning. The alarm blares. As you begin to wake and wonder how it could possibly be morning already, your good intentions dawn on you. It’s run morning – and it’s the last thing you want to do.


Governments Endorse Plan To Address NCDs As Development Priority At WHO-Backed Conference

U.N. News Centre: Governments endorse U.N.-backed plan to tackle cancer, diabetes, and other deadly diseases “Global leaders have pledged to take bold action to reduce suffering from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which include the world’s leading killers — heart and lung diseases, cancers, and diabetes — the United Nations health agency has reported. Governments on Wednesday…More


Incidence Of Obesity, Diabetes Increasing In African Nations, Report Shows

The Guardian: Supermarkets are creating an obesity crisis in African countries, experts warn “Changing dietary habits are creating an obesity crisis in African countries as middle-class people buy their food from supermarkets rather than eating food they grow, a group of international food security experts has warned. A report by the Malabo Montpellier Panel, a…More


Western Fast Food Industry Contributing To Growing Obesity, Diabetes Cases In Ghana, Raising…

New York Times: Obesity Was Rising as Ghana Embraced Fast Food. Then Came KFC “…KFC’s presence in Ghana so far is relatively modest but rapidly growing, and it underscores the way fast food can shape palates, habits, and waistlines. Research shows that people who eat more fast food are more likely to gain weight and…More


Taking the pulse of heart disease

On Saturday 26 – Wednesday 30 August, the world’s largest cardiovascular congress will take place In Barcelona, Spain. The ESC congress will convene global experts and present advancements in cardiovascular medicine worldwide. To bring us up to speed on all thing cardiovascular health, Dr Anna Beale ‘takes the pulse’ of heart disease in this piece.   In 2017, healthcare spending continues to rise globally. Total health expenditure as a percentage of total GDP increased from 8.5% in 1995 to 9.8% in 2014


Managing overweight and obesity in children and young people

Why is excess weight a problem in children and young people? Currently too many children and adolescents across the world are already overweight or obese (i.e. too heavy for their age, height and sex). This is a concern because children with obesity are at a greater risk of developing a number of serious problems during childhood such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, joint and sleep complaints. Children with excess weight can also suffer from low self-esteem, stigmatization and mental health problems which can lead to reduced quality of life.


August 2017 Issue Of WHO Bulletin Available Online

WHO: Bulletin of the World Health Organization The August 2017 WHO Bulletin includes editorials, news, and research and policy articles on various issues, including care and testing for tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, diabetes, and malaria (August 2017).


Chronic kidney disease and the global NCD agenda

2017 is an important year for the international nephrology community. March 9 was World Kidney Day, the theme this year being ‘Kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyles for healthy kidneys’, highlighting the crucial link between the kidneys and metabolic and cardiovascular health. In April, the Global Kidney Health Atlas, one of the largest health-related country capacity reviews in history, was launched at the World Congress of Nephrology in Mexico City. The Atlas, a first for the nephrology community, is a multinational cross-sectional survey designed to assess need and capacity for kidney care worldwide and provide the foundation for a global surveillance network for chronic kidney disease (CKD) care.


Can health ignite a political revolution?

Late last month, you could not ignore the chants of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn” to the tune of the White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nations Army’ as it echoed around the fields of Glastonbury. Regardless of your political affiliations, having hordes of young, passionate millennials singing the name of a political leader at a music festival is something which few would have predicted earlier that month. Why the change? – Could it be that young people in the UK feel a new sense of hope as they have been given a voice through health? Hope is something which has been on short supply in the UK of late


The secret, hidden pricetag on your cola bottle

0000-0002-1767-4576The line at the convenience store is three people deep. Standing in front of me is a 40-something man with a bottle of cola and a newspaper. In front of him, a mother paying her utility bill accompanied by her young daughter. The mum and child leave, and the man moves forward to pay. “Two dollars?” I overhear him exclaim with surprise… “I remember when a bottle of cola was one!” As he pays and heads for the door, I too grab a newspaper and cannot help but notice the story on the front cover: the mounting crisis of costs from an obesity epidemic gripping not just the nation, but the planet – the economic and health systems already struggling to keep pace.


“Appendix III” is critical for accelerating progress on NCDs

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 70% of global deaths in 2015, with three quarters of these deaths occurring in low and middle income countries (LMICs). NCDs are a silent epidemic of premature and preventable death and disability from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and mental and neurological disorders. Their main risk factors – unhealthy diets, alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity, and environmental determinants such as air pollution, are transmitted via unhealthy environments. They are directly and indirectly caused by commercial determinants, misaligned public policies in agriculture, commerce, education, energy, health, finance, trade, and social security, and are exacerbated by social determinants including poverty and inequity. In 2011, The United Nations General Assembly declared NCDs a global health and development challenge at a UN High-Level Summit.


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