Mental Health

Featured

“Depression: let’s talk” says WHO, as depression tops list of causes of ill health

Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives. The new estimates have been released in the lead-up to World Health Day on 7 April, the high point in WHO’s year-long campaign “Depression: let’s talk”.

One Man’s Death Points to Shortcomings in Morocco’s Mental Health Infrastructure

By Molly Mulroy  This article was produced in conjunction with an SIT Study Abroad program http://studyabroad.sit.edu/programs/semester/spring-2017/moj/ in Morocco and Round Earth Media, www.RoundEarthMedia.org a nonprofit Read More

WHO | Reforming mental health in Lebanon amid refugee crises

Article published in August 2016 Source: WHO | Reforming mental health in Lebanon amid refugee crises

Latest

Managing overweight and obesity in children and young people

Why is excess weight a problem in children and young people? Currently too many children and adolescents across the world are already overweight or obese (i.e. too heavy for their age, height and sex). This is a concern because children with obesity are at a greater risk of developing a number of serious problems during childhood such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, joint and sleep complaints. Children with excess weight can also suffer from low self-esteem, stigmatization and mental health problems which can lead to reduced quality of life.


Measuring the double burden of air pollution

On a recent trip to China to collect data on air pollution as part of the China Kadoorie Biobank prospective cohort study, Ka Hung Chan was struck by the limitations of available personal exposure collection and monitoring devices. Without improved devices and data, we won’t clear the air on pollution in heavily burdened LMICs – and generate much needed political attention and investment in prevention.   In the latest Global Burden of Disease study, ambient and household air pollution* were together ranked the 4th leading risk factors of disease burden (after dietary risks, tobacco smoke and high blood pressure), accounting for 6.5 million premature deaths in 2015. Up to 90% of these deaths occurred in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs), many of which are undergoing industrialisation and suffering from ever-worsening ambient air pollution (AAP), as well as unresolved household air pollution (HAP) from domestic solid fuel use – this is the  ‘double burden of air pollution’.   Available evidence While AAP has been rising on the global public health agenda in recent years, early epidemiological investigations begun after the infamous 1952 London smog event


Foreign Aid Spending Could Be ‘More Productive For Peace, Security’ Than War

The Conversation: Aid not war — can foreign aid projects help improve national security? Mick McKeown, reader in democratic mental health at the University of Central Lancashire, and Nicola Lowe, professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Central Lancashire “The overseas aid budget is coming under attack, both in the U.K. and the USA.…More


When water doesn’t flow…

I thought it was appendicitis and feared for the worst. The car hit a few potholes and a small crater in the road. My eyes flew open and I dry heaved. ‘You’ve really done it this time, Marisa.


‘Little Short Of A Revolution’ Needed To Improve Mental Health Care Worldwide, U.N. Expert…

U.N. News Centre: Nothing short of a ‘sea change’ will end years of gross neglect in mental health care — U.N. expert “Citing decades of neglect in mental health care, a United Nations human rights expert [Tuesday] denounced ‘biomedical gatekeepers’ who perpetuate stigma and urged States and psychiatrists to act with courage to reform a…More


Three Clinicians Bring Pioneering Mental Health Services to Remote Villages in Liberia

Photo by Rebecca E. Rollins / Partners In HealthA view inside the mental health office at J.J. Dossen hospital in southeast Liberia. A village healer warned that if she crossed the river, then bad things would happen, but in Regina’s* youth there was no need to worry. She grew up, helped around the house, and married


Medical Aid and Food to Thousands of Peru Flood Victims

Photo courtesy of Socios En SaludDr. Leonid Lecca (right), executive director of PIH in Peru, speaks with staff and residents in Las Brisas, one of the communities hardest hit by last month’s flooding. One month has passed since devastating floods and mudslides swept Peru’s coastline and communities north of the capital of Lima, killing 113 people and destroying the homes of an estimated 700,000 people. The powerful rainy season storms, sparked by an El Niño in the neighboring Pacific Ocean, cut power and access to clean drinking water in the region. Roads and bridges crumbled, leaving remote farming villages isolated for days


Sadness or depression: Making sense of low mood and the medicalization of everyday life

Publication date: June 2017 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 183 Author(s): Christian Bröer, Broos Besseling This research focusses on low mood as a generic category in everyday social interactions, outside the clinical realm and among non-patients.


Concrete health opportunities

Cities will determine the health and wellbeing of populations in the 21st century: Threat or opportunity? Building a case for action The environment in which we move, work, learn, play, and eat determines our potential to achieve good health. Concrete jungles, food desserts, roads which resemble car parking lots, overpowering air and noise pollution, obesogenic environments, and isolation among density are not uncommon features of urban living – all of which predispose to physical and psychological ailments. Urbanisation, most notably mega, rapid or unplanned, currently poses a huge threat to human and environmental health, but is equally an unprecedented opportunity for action. In 2016, over 50 percent of the global population were urban dwellers


On World Health Day, WHO Director General Candidates Discuss Need To Address Global Mental…

Huffington Post: Let’s Talk about Depression and Scale Up Mental Health Services Tedros Adhanom, special adviser to the prime minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and a candidate for WHO director general “…[W]e can and must address the grand challenge of mental health if we are to fully prevent and treat non-communicable diseases…More


Blog Posts Address Mental Health In Recognition Of World Health Day

OECD Insights: Depression: let’s talk. And act Emily Hewlett with the OECD Health Division discusses depression and mental health, writing, “We need better information, to understand what works, and where countries are falling short; at OECD, we are particularly keen to further improve international benchmarking of data and policies so as to drive improvements across…More


“Depression: let’s talk” says WHO, as depression tops list of causes of ill health

Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives. The new estimates have been released in the lead-up to World Health Day on 7 April, the high point in WHO’s year-long campaign “Depression: let’s talk”.


Report Calls On ‘Big Data’ To Fill Global Gender Data Gap

Devex: 3 ways gender data could go ‘big’ “More tightly mapped trends in girls’ stunting and access to contraception in Bangladesh. A better understanding of women’s mobility in a Latin American city. Stronger insights into women’s mental health via social media in cities around the world. All of these findings can be traced to big…More


Ebola Survivors Face Physical, Mental Health Issues, Lack Access To Health Care, NGO Says

Thomson Reuters Foundation: Three years after Ebola outbreak declared in Guinea, survivors still suffer — charity “Three years after the world’s worst recorded Ebola outbreak was first declared in Guinea, hundreds of survivors who suffer from physical and mental health problems are struggling to access care, a medical charity said on Friday. More than 1,100…More


Older Posts »