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Deaths of humanitarian aid workers reach record high

Sam Jones | Guardian Development | “Figures released for World Humanitarian Day show 2013 was most dangerous yet, with 155 deaths and 134 kidnappings” Deaths Read More

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South Sudan heads towards famine

The Guardian | “Urgent need for peace ignored as another deadline for a deal passes and splinter groups of rebels threaten to spread conflict” South Read More

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Gaza, Ebola, Iraq … are we approaching disaster overload? | The Guardian

The number of complex humanitarian emergencies seems to be increasing day by day.  How is the world responding as these important crises vie and compete for media attention? Read More

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Ebola Outbreak Will Affect African Economy, Politics For Years, Experts Say

Foreign Policy: Ebola Wreaking Havoc on African Economy “The death toll in the worst Ebola outbreak in history topped more than 1,200 as of Tuesday, according to the World Health Organization. The good news is that, for now, new cases appear to be limited to Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. The bad news is…More


Deaths of humanitarian aid workers reach record high

World map

Sam Jones | Guardian Development | “Figures released for World Humanitarian Day show 2013 was most dangerous yet, with 155 deaths and 134 kidnappings” Deaths Read More


Do we really need a new drug or vaccine for Ebola?

I get particularly excited when I see Global Health issues being debated in mainstream magazines and newspapers, and since the outbreak of Ebola has captured global attention, there has been no shortage of such discussions. Perhaps that is why I am blogging again. Why, the mainstream media asks, can we not curb the spread of this deadly epidemic that is ravaging a few countries in West Africa? Sadly, however, I think there has been too much of reacting to Ebola as though Ebola was just any other global health problem: Ebola is about Poverty, Ebola is about Globalization, or Ebola is about Culture.


A Multidimensional Approach to Safeguarding Health Workers

“While the hospital compound was safe, we could easily hear gunfire and bombings…we were scared… for the last one month, we did not have access to cooking gas and had to use electric heaters to cook food…and in just eight months, I could not earn enough to recover the expense [of my loans].”  –Princy, a nurse from Kerala’s Ernakulam district working at the Tripoli Medical Centre hospital. (Source: The Hindu)During conflict situations, violence can transform health workers’ professional and personal livelihoods. They often suffer threats that are physical, financial, and emotional.Indian health officials are grappling with this issue now as they determine how to assist Indian nurses trapped in regions of Libya engulfed in intermittent fighting.Earlier this month, Kerala Chief Minister Oomen Chandy and Federal Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj organized evacuations for thousands of Indian nurses who worked at Libyan hospitals in Tripoli and Benghazi.The Indian government has issued a plea for banks to waive interest on loans to health workers caught in conflict zones. Nonetheless, only 10% of Indian health workers in Libya expressed interest in evacuating.


Data Revolution from the Bottom-Up

Data revolutionaries around the world (myself included) are using every forum possible to call for more and better data that is disaggregated, produced more frequently, more open, and more useable. Recently, my colleague Alex Ezeh at the African Population and Health Research Centre wrote me: “We cannot address data system challenges in Tanzania or Nigeria by holding high level meetings in New York or London.” He’s right: The path to more, better, timely, and open data starts with strengthening country governments’ core data collection, analysis, and use, whether it’s routine economic statistics or sustainable development goals. Country action should drive the revolution, bottom-up not top-down.


South Sudan heads towards famine

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The Guardian | “Urgent need for peace ignored as another deadline for a deal passes and splinter groups of rebels threaten to spread conflict” South Read More


Continuing professional development training needs of medical laboratory personnel in Botswana

Background: Laboratory professionals are expected to maintain their knowledge on the most recent advances in laboratory testing and continuing professional development (CPD) programs can address this expectation.


Security, Public Health Objectives Should Remain Separate

The Guardian: Ebola, polio, HIV: it’s dangerous to mix health care and foreign policy Sophie Harman, senior lecturer in international politics at Queen Mary University of London “There are reasons to be fearful of the Ebola crisis gripping parts of West Africa: death, the risk of contagion, overburdened health infrastructure, and concern as neighboring countries…More


Blog Provides ‘Roundup’ Of Global Health Issues, Related Politics

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: While Museveni mulls ‘harmonized’ homophobia, no news from Nigeria is bad news, Kenya considers death by stoning, and smiling faces hide ugly truths… We’re reading about politics over public health Antigone Barton, writer and editor of “Science Speaks” and senior communications officer at the Center for Global Health…More


Gaza, Ebola, Iraq … are we approaching disaster overload? | The Guardian

World map

The number of complex humanitarian emergencies seems to be increasing day by day.  How is the world responding as these important crises vie and compete for media attention? Read More


Experimental Treatments for Ebola: Ethical? Yes. Effective? Who knows. Can we have it both…

This is a cross-post with the Innovations for Poverty Action blog. I want to thank Jeff Mosenkis for asking me to write this post. Yesterday an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization released a statement about the ethics of making experimental treatments for Ebola available to patients during the current West African outbreak. The panel unanimously concluded that it was, in fact, ethical for such treatments, which so far have never been shown to be effective, to be made available to patients given the existing circumstances and when particular conditions, for example informed consent and freedom of choice, are met. In essence: it would be unethical to withhold these treatments to wait for the rigorous randomized controlled trials that are typically done to establish effectiveness


The Guardian Examines Challenges Of Providing Humanitarian Aid In Syria

The Guardian: Permits, politics and patience: the reality of getting aid into Syria “Humanitarian workers are being frustrated by violence, bureaucracy, and an obstinate government as they try to diminish the impact of the war on civilians…” (Black, 8/12).


The Disruption of the “See-And-Treat” Paradigm: Cervical Cancer Prevention in LMICs

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In recent years in global health, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), or “the vinegar test,” has widely been heralded as a simple and cost-effective cervical Read More


“Africa, With U.S. Help, Graduates More Doctors” @NYTimes

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I’m happy to see the work of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative making into the mainstream media, as a series of articles on their 4-year work is Read More


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