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Accelerating an Integrated Approach to NCD Prevention and Control Globally

Dr. Samira Asma, Chief, Global NCD Program, CDC Over the past 18 years, I’ve worked with Ministries of Health and other partners in 180 countries to advance CDC’s overarching global health goals and accelerate strategies for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries. NCDs and injuries are responsible for millions of premature deaths, especially in low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). As public health practitioners, we have an important opportunity to work collaboratively to accelerate and scale up implementation of proven prevention and treatment strategies and measure their impact.

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A Real Test for the GFF: Improving Maternal and Child Health in Conflict Settings

A highlight of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development, held last week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, was the launch of a new Global Financing Facility (GFF) to end preventable maternal and child deaths by 2030. This partnership will bring together countries, UN agencies, multilateral groups, private sector investors, and civil society organizations in order to close the $33 billion annual funding gap for reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH).

Second Chances, by Susan Reynolds Whyte, was published by Duke University Press in 2014.

Patients “Achieving” Healthcare in LMICs: Reflections on “Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda”

I recently read the book Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda, edited by Susan Reynolds Whyte, a medical anthropologist who has been conducting research and Read More

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Where Are the DRC’s Doctors and Nurses? iHRIS Data Give Us Hints

Poring over data from his native Democratic Republic of Congo this summer, Jean Lambert Chalachala uncovered some interesting—and troubling—aspects of the DRC’s health workforce.For one thing, he says, a third of the nurses for whom there are data in the DRC are over 60 years old.“Do you understand what this means?” he asks. “The official retirement age in the DRC is 60—they should be retired. And we will need new nurses to replace them.”Since 2014, the DRC has been working with IntraHealth International to deploy iHRIS (pronounced “iris”) to eventually keep track of and manage all data on the country’s health workforce. The free, open source software developed by IntraHealth gives the DRC and 19 other countries a clear view of how many health workers they have, where those workers are stationed, whether their training is up-to-date, and much more.Each year, the DRC produces at least 2,000 new doctors and 7,000 new nurses.


Pinker tells bioethics what its new moral imperative is, or not

Steven Pinker has written a provocative opinion piece today in the Boston Globe about bioethics. It was apparently sparked by a new technique for editing genomes, namely CRISPR-Cas9, and the social, political and ethical responses to this novel biotechnology. In a nutshell, Pinker states that promising new biotechnologies for improving human health like CRISPR-Cas9 should be aggressively pursued, and ” … the primary moral goal for today’s bioethics can be summarized in a single sentence. Get out of the way.” If bioethicists are not getting out of the way, they are, um, in the way


Imperialism and access to bioethics journals

Let’s say that bioethics is about understanding and managing conflicts of value related to health and care for health. Call them moral challenges. Let’s also say that there is something at stake in these challenges, i.e. that they could be understood and managed for better or for worse, where the ‘better’ and the ‘worse’ could impact on human lives.


Feminization of the medical workforce in low-income settings; findings from surveys in three…

Background: Women represent an increasingly growing share of the medical workforce in high-income countries, with abundant research focusing on reasons and implications of the phenomenon.


Accelerating an Integrated Approach to NCD Prevention and Control Globally

world-health-day-image

Dr. Samira Asma, Chief, Global NCD Program, CDC Over the past 18 years, I’ve worked with Ministries of Health and other partners in 180 countries to advance CDC’s overarching global health goals and accelerate strategies for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries. NCDs and injuries are responsible for millions of premature deaths, especially in low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). As public health practitioners, we have an important opportunity to work collaboratively to accelerate and scale up implementation of proven prevention and treatment strategies and measure their impact.


Haiti’s Need for Mental Health Services, Before and After the Quake

When people find out that I experienced the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010, they are understandably curious.But when I tell the story, even five years later, my heart rate rises. I get goosebumps. My palms sweat. I feel short of breath, and often tears well up in my eyes.As each aftershock came and went, people erupted in song and prayer.


Global Health Innovation Landscape Must Shift With Changing Health Financing Trends

Devex: The new market builders for health innovation Michael Igoe, global development reporter for Devex “…At the recent International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, negotiators sent a strong message that global development’s future resides with domestic tax resources and private investment, not with foreign aid. That means the market for global…More


Extend HIV treatment to all, WHO to recommend

The advice to expand treatment beyond vulnerable groups follows studies showing the benefits of early intervention.


Low-Cost Oral Rehydration Solution Can Save Many Lives Worldwide

Skoll World Forum: ORS Is a Magic Elixir That Saves Lives Helen Matzger, senior program officer on the Vaccine Delivery Team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Anita Zaidi, director of the Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases Program at the foundation “…One critically important intervention the health community has used for decades is a…More


Stopping Asia’s Hepatitis Epidemic Requires More Urgent Resources, Political Will, Financing

Wall Street Journal: Confronting Asia’s Hepatitis Epidemic Ding-Shinn Chen and Stephen Locarnini, co-chairs of the Coalition to Eradicate Viral Hepatitis in Asia Pacific “…Hepatitis has not received funding commensurate with the magnitude of the problem. … We can stop the increasing burden of hepatitis B and hepatitis C with resources and political will. … Implementing…More


Tomorrow’s Health Sectors Need More IT Staff, Interoperable Systems

Today, health sectors around the world—including throughout Africa, South and Central America, and Asia—are swimming in data.New health information systems are helping officials track not only disease outbreaks and health care needs, but their countries’ health workforces as well.Countries can now find out how many health workers they have, whether those workers are up-to-date on their licenses and training, and whether they’re stationed in the right places. These data are crucial when it comes to planning. They can help guide health-sector policy, funding, and ultimately a population’s health and well-being.As systems and their languages evolve, interoperability will be key. But what happens when the information systems that store these data don’t work together? When the information becomes trapped, inaccessible, or just too hard to reach?Carl Leitner, associate director of health workforce informatics at IntraHealth International, works to break down the language barrier that keeps health information systems from communicating with one another.


Courage to Change Child and Youth Lives

“My dream has always been to work with children,” said Siphiwe Sikhasa, between games at the soccer field at the Safe Park in Grabouw, South Africa.Just 45 minutes outside of cosmopolitan Cape Town, the small town with dirt roads looks like a world away.Sikhasa is a coordinator of the Safe Park, a space where children of all ages can safely play, receive homework help, discuss issues burdening young minds, learn valuable skills, and oftentimes receive hot meals.His passion for helping children is apparent as he runs the field and freely gives hugs and high fives. Most days there are nearly 200 children at the Safe Park. On this particular overcast, drizzling June winter day, there are approximately 20 children playing soccer and 110 children at the Safe Park. Most days there are nearly 200 children.The Safe Parks are a component of the 309 Isibindi programs established in 161 communities throughout South Africa by the National Association of Child Care Workers (NACCW).Meaning “courage” in IsiZulu, Isibindi serves more than 200,000 vulnerable children nationwide, including those who live in grandparent-headed or child-headed households; have disabilities, HIV/AIDS, or other diseases; are caring for ailing family members; are victims of abuse; face struggles at school or home; or are affected by a number of other factors that could lead to unsafe situations.In addition to working at the Safe Park, Sikhasa and other trained and supervised child and youth care workers (CYCWs) continue to help families in their immediate communities by going door-to-door to assess needs and offer support to those who need it.Each worker aids up to 48 children, monitoring a child’s progress, acting as their confidant and providing support in various areas as needed in a child’s life. CYCWs build relationships with children through interaction in typical daily routines—cooking together, reading, household chores, and life skills.The Nghonyama* family is one of the thousands visited 3-5 times a week by CYCWs. Since 2011, Edwina is the CYCW who has been working with the family’s five children, currently ages 5-17, and the grandmother caring for the children.


Government Action Key To Sustaining Nutrition Promotion Efforts In Africa

Huffington Post: Good news: African Governments are Seriously Stepping Up Their Fight Against Malnutrition Marc Van Ameringen, executive director of Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) “…At the recent Financing for Development conference held in Addis Ababa on 14-16 July, the government of Ethiopia took the opportunity to reiterate its willingness to break the cycle…More


The complex remuneration of human resources for health in low-income settings: policy…

Background: Human resources for health represent an essential component of health systems and play a key role to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage.


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