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Motorbikes Speed Up HIV Test Results In Malawi

See more here: Motorbikes Speed Up HIV Test Results In Malawi

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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →

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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.

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Dr. Paul Farmer Reflects on Medicine and the Boston Marathon Bombing

The morning rush begins outside of University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti. Rebecca E. Rollins / Partners In Health Dr. Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health, delivered this address at the Celebration of Partnership event on April 28, 2013, at Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais (HUM) in Haiti. We’re publishing it for the first time, in gratitude to all who helped make possible University Hospital’s first year of services, and in remembrance of the victims of the Boston marathon bombing one year ago


U.N. Documents Show Syrian President’s Efforts To Cut Off Food Supplies To Rebel-Held Areas

Foreign Policy: Exclusive: U.N. Docs Expose Assad’s Starvation Campaign in Syria “Internal United Nations documents show modest improvements in the delivery of desperately needed food inside rebel-controlled areas of Syria. But the documents also point to a mass exodus of Syrians into areas controlled by President Bashar al-Assad in part because the dictator is the…More


Motorbike Couriers Speed Lab Sample Delivery In Malawi

Owen Nyaka, a member of the Key Correspondents Network supported by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, writes in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog about how the “Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) plans to work with motorcycle couriers Riders for Health to expand the laboratory samples transportation network in Malawi.” He notes,…More


IHP news 267: Happy Easter!

Dear Colleagues, It’s Friday, so my coffee consumption is going through the roof. The Christians among you probably have other things to do this weekend, so we’ll keep this intro short. The atheists, agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and new agers among you will surely not mind. As for the “Socialist” who has his very own religion, global health, maybe this weekend is a good time to chant his planetary manifesto together with his beloved ones.   In this week’s guest editorial, Agnes Nanyonjo ( from the Malaria Consortium Uganda, and also an EV 2012) provides some of her impressions of the 2014 Geneva Health Forum, focusing mostly on day 1 of the three-day conference


From health systems to systems for health

Agnes Nanyonjo (Malaria Consortium Uganda &  EV 2012)     The 2014 Geneva Health Forum attracted a multitude of participants from different sectors to the world health capital. They gathered for three days of debate on integration and interconnectedness of health care, as this year’s theme was ‘Global Health: Interconnected Challenges, Integrated Solutions’. The sessions by and large were designed to encourage interaction among participants and had session formats ranging from freewheeling fish bowls, a world café, … to more traditional ones like Q&A, debate etc. Integration can mean different things to different people working in different sectors, as has been previously highlighted by Rifat Atun, one of the plenary session speakers at the Forum. He stated in a 2010 Health Policy and Planning paper for example that “systematic analysis of the relative merits of integration in various contexts and for different interventions is complicated as there is no commonly accepted definition of ‘integration’—a term loosely used to describe a variety of organizational arrangements for a range of programmes in different settings.“ As panel discussants burst out into debate, this became all too clear: from integrated disease care over integrated provision of health service packages to multisectoral approaches to health, different views of integration abounded according to people’s perspectives and experience.


Motorbikes Speed Up HIV Test Results In Malawi

malawi flag

See more here: Motorbikes Speed Up HIV Test Results In Malawi


Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →


Using GPS Data to DELIVER Health Products to People Faster

Andrew Inglis, GIS Team Lead at John Snow, Inc. for the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, describes how his team used GPS technology to map road networks in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. The USAID | DELIVER PROJECT is funded by USAID. Imagine driving a delivery truck without a map or any idea how long it will take to […]


Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.


The benefits of public-private partnerships in global health

It is imperative that both the public and private sectors work together. Businesses have invested in GAVI because they know that one of the strongest ways to promote global health is through immunization. And quite simply, vaccines provide a strong return on investment. Through collaboration between the public and private sectors, GAVI has been able to raise additional funds and, most importantly, bring significant private-sector expertise, skills, advocacy and visibility to its work The post The benefits of public-private partnerships in global health appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.