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Accelerating an Integrated Approach to NCD Prevention and Control Globally

Dr. Samira Asma, Chief, Global NCD Program, CDC Over the past 18 years, I’ve worked with Ministries of Health and other partners in 180 countries to advance CDC’s overarching global health goals and accelerate strategies for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries. NCDs and injuries are responsible for millions of premature deaths, especially in low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). As public health practitioners, we have an important opportunity to work collaboratively to accelerate and scale up implementation of proven prevention and treatment strategies and measure their impact.

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Poor health systems hamper fight against tropical diseases

Just US$300 million a year would greatly improve drug delivery for neglected tropical diseases, says coalition.

Second Chances, by Susan Reynolds Whyte, was published by Duke University Press in 2014.

Patients “Achieving” Healthcare in LMICs: Reflections on “Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda”

I recently read the book Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda, edited by Susan Reynolds Whyte, a medical anthropologist who has been conducting research and Read More

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Accelerating an Integrated Approach to NCD Prevention and Control Globally

world-health-day-image

Dr. Samira Asma, Chief, Global NCD Program, CDC Over the past 18 years, I’ve worked with Ministries of Health and other partners in 180 countries to advance CDC’s overarching global health goals and accelerate strategies for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries. NCDs and injuries are responsible for millions of premature deaths, especially in low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). As public health practitioners, we have an important opportunity to work collaboratively to accelerate and scale up implementation of proven prevention and treatment strategies and measure their impact.


Extend HIV treatment to all, WHO to recommend

The advice to expand treatment beyond vulnerable groups follows studies showing the benefits of early intervention.


Low-Cost Oral Rehydration Solution Can Save Many Lives Worldwide

Skoll World Forum: ORS Is a Magic Elixir That Saves Lives Helen Matzger, senior program officer on the Vaccine Delivery Team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Anita Zaidi, director of the Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases Program at the foundation “…One critically important intervention the health community has used for decades is a…More


Mauritian president discusses why traditional medicine matters

Hear Ameenah Gurib-Fakim explain why scientists should tap local knowledge for development solutions.


Ambitious new U.S. plan may put hundreds of thousands on MDR-TB treatment

Categories: Research and Development, TB, U.S. Policy and FundingThe United States plans to place 360,000 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients globally on treatment over the next five years, as part of a national tuberculosis action plan currently under draft. The plan – which is due to be submitted to the White House in September – aims to promote universal MDR-TB treatment, accelerate basic TB research, […](Read more…)


WHO calls for urgent action to curb hepatitis

On World Hepatitis Day (28 July) WHO highlights the urgent need for countries to enhance action to prevent viral hepatitis infection and to ensure that people who have been infected are diagnosed and offered treatment. This year, the Organization is focusing particularly on hepatitis B and C, which together cause approximately 80% of all liver cancer deaths and kill close to 1.4 million people every year. WHO is alerting people to the risks of contracting hepatitis from unsafe blood, unsafe injections, and sharing drug-injection equipment. Some 11 million people who inject drugs have hepatitis B or C infection. Children born to mothers with hepatitis B or C and sex partners of people with hepatitis are also at risk of becoming infected.


Successes in HIV Overshadow Failures in TB

The world is celebrating a giant milestone in the fight against HIV: 15 million people are now on lifesaving treatment using highly effective antiretroviral drugs! It’s a huge win for global health, and of course for the millions whose lives have been saved.


Daily H.I.V. Drug Regimen Is Effective in African Women, Study Says – The New York Times

Taking an antiretroviral drug daily shielded 76 percent of young African women assigned the drug — a particularly hard group to protect — against H.I.V. Read More


Clear Guidance, Strategy Needed To Effectively Deliver HIV Drugs

PLOS “Speaking of Medicine”: Simple but elusive — why are we still talking about HIV drug delivery? Ahead of the 2015 International AIDS Society (IAS) conference, Helen Bygrave, general practitioner at Médecins Sans Frontières, “discusses her frustrations with the lack of implementation of simple, programmatic strategies for improving HIV care” (7/19).


Simple but elusive – why are we still talking about HIV drug delivery?

Ahead of the International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference held in 2015 in Vancouver, Canada (July 19-22), Helen Bygrave of MSF discusses her frustrations with the lack of implementation of simple, programmatic strategies for improving HIV care. My main memory of … Continue reading » The post Simple but elusive – why are we still talking about HIV drug delivery? appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.


Investing In Community Health Systems, Workers Critical To Preventing Future Epidemics

Huffington Post: Investing in Community Health Workers Is Essential for Preventing the Next Ebola Raj Panjabi, CEO of Last Mile Health and associate physician in the division of Global Health Equity at Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School; and Jeffrey Walker, co-author of ‘The Generosity Network’ “…At the core of [stronger, integrated community-based health] delivery…More


Official ODA Must Complement Local Development Delivery Models

Huffington Post: Can We Finance Sustainable Development? Chris W. Williams, executive director of Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council “…Increasingly, innovative citizens are creatively devising south-south, country-to-country delivery models for development. … Donor funds can now form a much smaller portion of the resources required to solve the development challenges in the global South. The…More


The effect of payment and incentives on motivation and focus of community health workers: five…

IntroductionCommunity health workers (CHWs) have been proposed as a means for bridging gaps in healthcare delivery in rural communities.


Single Serve Safety for Newborns to Reduce HIV Transmission: Pratt Pouch, Part 2

Pratt Pouches have been in the development for over three years to improve the delivery of antiretroviral therapy to newborns and have been laboratory and field tested. Robert Malkin and the engineers at the Developing World Healthcare Technology Laboratory at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering saw a need and sought to find a medically effective, simple and cost effective solution to an ongoing dilemma in the fight against HIV. What so difficult in giving ART to newborns? It is well known that giving newborns antiretrovirals in the first 24 to 72 hours drastically decreases the transmission of HIV from the mother to baby but the means to do so in areas most in need is prohibitive on two fronts. In areas most in need, more than half of the mothers deliver at home with little access to a clinic or community health workers.


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