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Second Chances, by Susan Reynolds Whyte, was published by Duke University Press in 2014.

Patients “Achieving” Healthcare in LMICs: Reflections on “Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda”

I recently read the book Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda, edited by Susan Reynolds Whyte, a medical anthropologist who has been conducting research and Read More

hypertension blood pressure wiki

World HTN Day— High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, has become a global crisis

In the United States, about 70 million or 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure (>140/90 mmHg) , and only about half of these adults have their condition under control. Worldwide, high blood pressure is estimated to cause 9 million preventable deaths, and is expected to increase. Commonly referred to as the “silent killer” because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attack and stroke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has created the Million Hearts® initiative to address this challenge within the United States.  Launched in 2011, it set an ambitious goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

Cynthia GoldsmithThis colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. See PHIL 1832 for a black and white version of this image.Where is Ebola virus found in nature?The exact origin, locations, and natural habitat (known as the "natural reservoir") of Ebola virus remain unknown. However, on the basis of available evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is zoonotic (animal-borne) and is normally maintained in an animal host that is native to the African continent. A similar host is probably associated with Ebola-Reston which was isolated from infected cynomolgous monkeys that were imported to the United States and Italy from the Philippines. The virus is not known to be native to other continents, such as North America.

WHO Failed To Engage Local, International Partners In Ebola Response, Independent Panel Reports

News outlets discuss the first report of the WHO’s Ebola Interim Assessment Panel, released on Monday. Agence France-Presse: Experts denounce WHO’s slow Ebola response “A U.N.-sponsored report on Monday denounced the World Health Organization’s slow response to the Ebola outbreak and said the agency still did not have the capacity to tackle a similar crisis…”…More

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Should I stay or should I go? Exploring the job preferences of allied health professionals…

IntroductionThe uneven distribution of allied health professionals (AHPs) in rural and remote Australia and other countries is well documented.


Healthcare In Danger: what happens when it all goes wrong?

This week on PLOS Translational Global Health, emergency physician and humanitarian & global health doctor, Jenny Jamieson, writes about some of the tacit dangers of delivering healthcare in low-resource settings. As healthcare workers, some of us travel to resource-limited settings to deliver care where needs are the greatest. Due to various factors, which range from economic inequality among citizens, political instability, natural disasters, conflict or warfare, many of these places are also some of the most dangerous. As a result, healthcare workers can find themselves working side-by-side to crime; and even becoming the target of directed threats or violence. Those who are willing to put themselves on the front line in order to help others, can themselves end up being actively targeted


Experts Stress Need For Improvements In Aid Delivery After Ebola

Thomson Reuters Foundation: Ebola showed aid delivery desperately needs an overhaul “The Ebola epidemic exposed long-standing holes in aid delivery, which desperately needs an overhaul before the next international emergency hits, aid experts said on Thursday. Many of the shortcomings seen during the Haiti earthquake of slow responses and uncoordinated relief efforts were repeated during…More


Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering HIV Programs for Sex Workers

Today sees the addition of an important paper to the PLOS Collection Focus on Delivery and Scale: Achieving HIV Impact with Sex Workers; published in PLOS Medicine, David Wilson of World Bank looks at lessons learnt and challenges for developing and … Continue reading » The post Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering HIV Programs for Sex Workers appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.


Patients “Achieving” Healthcare in LMICs: Reflections on “Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda”

Second Chances, by Susan Reynolds Whyte, was published by Duke University Press in 2014.

I recently read the book Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda, edited by Susan Reynolds Whyte, a medical anthropologist who has been conducting research and Read More


Pratt Pouch for PMTCT: More on its Evolution from an undergraduate research project on failure…

Robert Malkin and the engineers at the Developing World Healthcare Technology Laboratory at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering saw a need and sought to find a medically effective, simple and cost effective solution to an ongoing dilemma in the fight against HIV. Originally Malkin’s undergraduate class set out to figure out why prior approaches to home based PMTCT solutions had failed. The class did not plan to create a solution, but they did indeed do just that. Pratt Pouches have been in the development for multiple years with lab-based and clinical studies determine whether this new drug delivery device can radically improve the efficacy of home-based antiretroviral therapy to newborns.


How a Ketchup-sized and shaped foilized pouch can save babies at home

Introducing an exciting innovation in the effort to reduce HIV transmission to newborns The drugs aren’t new, but this new delivery system provides an innovative solution to on-going obstacles AND is amazingly simple. The Pratt Pouch is a small package resembling the ketchup that comes with your takeout, but the Pratt Pouch is filled with a precise dose of antiretroviral drugs. Studies have shown that immediate treatment of newborns with antiretrovirals significantly reduces HIV transmission from mother to baby. These drugs have been readily administered in the clinic setting but the challenge continues to be in areas where women deliver at home.


World HTN Day— High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, has become a global crisis

hypertension blood pressure wiki

In the United States, about 70 million or 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure (>140/90 mmHg) , and only about half of these adults have their condition under control. Worldwide, high blood pressure is estimated to cause 9 million preventable deaths, and is expected to increase. Commonly referred to as the “silent killer” because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attack and stroke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has created the Million Hearts® initiative to address this challenge within the United States.  Launched in 2011, it set an ambitious goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.


Yemen’s Tenuous Temporary Ceasefire Allows For Delivery Of Humanitarian Aid To Civilians

Agence France-Presse: Situation in Yemen ‘catastrophic,’ warns U.N. food agency “The U.N.’s food agency warned Wednesday that the situation in Yemen was ‘catastrophic,’ as aid agencies rushed to take advantage of a temporary ceasefire to help desperate civilians…” (5/13). U.N. News Centre: Yemen: U.N. welcomes ceasefire as ‘lifesaving’ humanitarian relief begins to arrive “The top…More


Take Care

It’s interesting to note the emergence of two strands of discussion in the public space around humanitarian aid and development. One is the issue of chronic and/or traumatic stress and accompanying PTSD among humanitarian workers. In an earlier post I pointed out this article in The Guardian, and then a more recent offering in the […]


Devex Examines World Bank President Jim Kim’s ‘Science Of Delivery’ System

Devex: Inside Jim Kim’s ‘science of delivery’ “…Kim’s emphasis on delivery and systematically sharing knowledge can be traced at least back to his time at the World Health Organization from 2003 to 2006. It was at the WHO where Kim noticed that policymakers and health care workers with access to similar resources achieved different health…More


Enhancing public health practice through a capacity-building educational programme: an…

Background: The Post-Graduate Diploma in Public Health Management, launched by the Govt.


WHO Failed To Engage Local, International Partners In Ebola Response, Independent Panel Reports

Cynthia GoldsmithThis colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. See PHIL 1832 for a black and white version of this image.Where is Ebola virus found in nature?The exact origin, locations, and natural habitat (known as the "natural reservoir") of Ebola virus remain unknown. However, on the basis of available evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is zoonotic (animal-borne) and is normally maintained in an animal host that is native to the African continent. A similar host is probably associated with Ebola-Reston which was isolated from infected cynomolgous monkeys that were imported to the United States and Italy from the Philippines. The virus is not known to be native to other continents, such as North America.

News outlets discuss the first report of the WHO’s Ebola Interim Assessment Panel, released on Monday. Agence France-Presse: Experts denounce WHO’s slow Ebola response “A U.N.-sponsored report on Monday denounced the World Health Organization’s slow response to the Ebola outbreak and said the agency still did not have the capacity to tackle a similar crisis…”…More


Building Resilient Health Systems Vital To Preventing Future Outbreaks

New York Times: Ebola-Free, but Not Resilient Judith Rodin, president of the Rockefeller Foundation, and Bernice Dahn, minister-designate of health for Liberia “…A resilient health system combines active surveillance mechanisms, robust health care delivery system, and a vigorous response to disease. … When a resilient system is in place, cities and countries alike are prepared…More


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