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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →

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How Rwandan Health Sector Rose From ‘Drips’ Induced By 1994 Genocide @NewTimesRwanda

An article by Dr. Joseph Kamugisha on how the post-Genocide Rwandan government has rejuvenated the Rwandan health sector through insurance, education, human rights and more….

Scrambling for Africa

Scrambling for Africa – an Interview with Johanna Tayloe Crane

Johanna Tayloe Crane has a PhD in medical anthropology and is an assistant professor at the University of Washington-Bothell.  Her research has examined urban health…

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IHP news 267: Happy Easter!

Dear Colleagues, It’s Friday, so my coffee consumption is going through the roof. The Christians among you probably have other things to do this weekend, so we’ll keep this intro short. The atheists, agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and new agers among you will surely not mind. As for the “Socialist” who has his very own religion, global health, maybe this weekend is a good time to chant his planetary manifesto together with his beloved ones.   In this week’s guest editorial, Agnes Nanyonjo ( from the Malaria Consortium Uganda, and also an EV 2012) provides some of her impressions of the 2014 Geneva Health Forum, focusing mostly on day 1 of the three-day conference


Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →


Blog Post Examines IHME Report On Global Health Financing

A post in the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog examines the “Financing Global Health 2013: Transition in an Age of Austerity” report published by the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation. “While development assistance to middle and low-income countries for global health reached an all-time high last year, assistance for ‘the main…More


Visualizing health funding gaps in West and Central Africa

IHME Earlier this week, Humanosphere reported on the overall trends in funding for global health – fairly steady, mostly flat the last few years, and perhaps in need of a re-focus. But which countries need help the most on the health front? That critical question came up at the April 8 launch event for this … Continue reading →


IHP news 266: The IHME report on global health financing

Dear Colleagues, Some of you are on early Easter holidays, so we’ll try to keep this newsletter a bit shorter than usual. Other good reasons for keeping it brief, is that Richard Horton occasionally pops up in my dreams now (which I’d like to avoid), and that I have to pick up my son from a table tennis camp, later this afternoon. In this newsletter we focus, among other issues, on the annual IHME report, ‘Financing Global Health 2013: Transition in an Age of Austerity’. Very nice report, apparently; on Twitter we learnt Chris Murray got a well-deserved “reception like a rock star”, when the report was launched. Unfortunately, the title is just plain wrong (granted, Bono himself gets it wrong on some issues too)


$45 million TB cut will not affect “aggregate U.S. support,” Shah says

But doesn’t explain how  . . . When USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah went to Congress to discuss the Obama administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2015, he began with remarks in which he made no mention of tuberculosis and aside from a mention of “creating an AIDS-free generation,” made no mention of the global […](Read more…)


How Rwandan Health Sector Rose From ‘Drips’ Induced By 1994 Genocide @NewTimesRwanda

rwanda flag wiki

An article by Dr. Joseph Kamugisha on how the post-Genocide Rwandan government has rejuvenated the Rwandan health sector through insurance, education, human rights and more….


The Daily Impact: Two UN workers shot dead in Somalia

April 8, 2014 A pair of aid workers – French and British respectively – were shot dead while arriving at an airport in Galkayo, central Somalia. From the Guardian: A UN source confirmed the pair were international staff members with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). A statement issued by the government of the northern breakaway state of Puntland in Somalia identified the two victims as Briton Simon Davis and Frenchman Clement Gorrissen. Nicholas Kay, special representative of the UN secretary-general for Somalia, said: “Our UN colleagues were working in support of the Somali people’s aspiration for a peaceful and stable future. There can be no justification for such a callous attack.


Are we leaving the private sector out of health systems strengthening?

Health system strengthening is widely recognized as the key to making progress toward the Millennium Development Goals and post-2015 successors. So it came as no surprise that development professionals who responded to the Devex survey identified it as a ‘best buy’ in global health. But to get the most out of this best buy, we should move beyond what is too narrow a definition of health system strengthening. The post Are we leaving the private sector out of health systems strengthening?


Scrambling for Africa – an Interview with Johanna Tayloe Crane

Scrambling for Africa

Johanna Tayloe Crane has a PhD in medical anthropology and is an assistant professor at the University of Washington-Bothell.  Her research has examined urban health…