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3.7 million in South Sudan face severe hunger crisis

Woman sits with food aid, in the north of South Sudan. ECHO Hunger looms over South Sudan. World leaders have spent the past few weeks trying to raise the alarm to garner enough public attention and funding to prevent a hunger crisis. Some 7 million people are at risk of food insecurity. The UN launched … Continue reading →

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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →

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How Rwandan Health Sector Rose From ‘Drips’ Induced By 1994 Genocide @NewTimesRwanda

An article by Dr. Joseph Kamugisha on how the post-Genocide Rwandan government has rejuvenated the Rwandan health sector through insurance, education, human rights and more….

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3.7 million in South Sudan face severe hunger crisis

sudanflag2

Woman sits with food aid, in the north of South Sudan. ECHO Hunger looms over South Sudan. World leaders have spent the past few weeks trying to raise the alarm to garner enough public attention and funding to prevent a hunger crisis. Some 7 million people are at risk of food insecurity. The UN launched … Continue reading →


Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →


Will this week’s aid and development gabfest in Mexico be just another boring conference or a…

It’s aid week here on the blog. To kick off, Oxfam policy adviser Nicola McIvor sets the scene for a big international conference in Mexico. Tomorrow and Wednesday, Angus Deaton and I have an argument about whether aid helps or harms development. Who knows, you may even get to vote. The development …


IHP news 266: The IHME report on global health financing

Dear Colleagues, Some of you are on early Easter holidays, so we’ll try to keep this newsletter a bit shorter than usual. Other good reasons for keeping it brief, is that Richard Horton occasionally pops up in my dreams now (which I’d like to avoid), and that I have to pick up my son from a table tennis camp, later this afternoon. In this newsletter we focus, among other issues, on the annual IHME report, ‘Financing Global Health 2013: Transition in an Age of Austerity’. Very nice report, apparently; on Twitter we learnt Chris Murray got a well-deserved “reception like a rock star”, when the report was launched. Unfortunately, the title is just plain wrong (granted, Bono himself gets it wrong on some issues too)


$45 million TB cut will not affect “aggregate U.S. support,” Shah says

But doesn’t explain how  . . . When USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah went to Congress to discuss the Obama administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2015, he began with remarks in which he made no mention of tuberculosis and aside from a mention of “creating an AIDS-free generation,” made no mention of the global […](Read more…)


What’s the future role and structure of aid and aid donors? Some options

Yesterday saw the announcement that foreign aid has defied economic and political gravity and reached a record high of $135bn in 2013. The news came as I headed off for a fascinating discussion on reforming the aid system at the ODI. Under Chatham House rules alas, so no names or institutions (ODI g…


How Rwandan Health Sector Rose From ‘Drips’ Induced By 1994 Genocide @NewTimesRwanda

rwanda flag wiki

An article by Dr. Joseph Kamugisha on how the post-Genocide Rwandan government has rejuvenated the Rwandan health sector through insurance, education, human rights and more….


A belated, but not forgotten, week in review

Articles He WroteRevealed: USAID’s Twitter-like attempt to ferment unrest in CubaAn AP report reveals that a US-backed program attempted to develop a Twitter-like service with the goal that it would help spark political unrest in Cuba.USAID hopes to boost innovation in development with new labUSAID unveiled its new innovation lab to some fanfare and concerns about its partnerships with the private sector.Meet Big Oil’s Big Men in Nigeria and GhanaA documentary now in theaters provides an inside look at an oil company operating in Ghana following the discovery of oil.Attacks on hospitals hamper South Sudan humanitarian responseHospitals run by Doctors Without Borders (MSF) have experienced looting and murdered patients, adding to the high concerns for South Sudan.Two important visuals for new global migration dataWe have looked previously at visual representations of migration, but these two visuals manage to capture the scale of movement and its impacts.Video of the Day: 5 Myths about Immigration in the US What 30 metric tons of food aid falling out of a plane looks like Gif Me a BreakGood ReadsIt doesn’t matter how smart you know, politics blinds your ability to make reasoned assessmentsThe state of inequality and why it is cause for concern in six charts.Recently discovered skeletons show the Black Death was spread by coughs and sneezes, not rats.Why Shakespeare should be read with an accent closer to Scottish than British English.”But here’s the thing the anti-vaxxers need to know, for the one billionth time: You’re wrong. Really, it’s that simple.”Catch up on the ongoing debate between Ta-Nehisi Coates of the Atlantic and Jonathan Chait of New Yorker over culture and race.The use of a private debt collector has brought back de facto debtor prisons.Remembering Kurt Cobain 20 years after his death.The abusive behavior of one of the most controversial pastors in America.The UN peacekeeper to saved hundreds of lives during the Rwandan genocide, 20 years ago.It’s a lot easier being a white guy, on Twitter.Neil Young’s new digital music player has raised more than $5 million on Kicksterter.Song of the DayThe War on Drugs – Red EyesDevelopment GoodiesA compelling read on the rise and fall of former US favorite strongman Chad’s Hissène Habré.5 Reasons Poverty Porn Empowers the Wrong Person Who is responsible for a failed aid project?If We Can Let Syria Burn, Have We Learned Anything at All from Rwanda? Dear USAID: What Were You Thinking With Cuban Twitter? The government of the #Philippines can only account for $14.3 million in donations out of the $600 million pledged.Fast Company with its 10 most innovative companies in Africa.World Vision Fall Out: one of its board members has quit following the groups decision to continue not hiring gay married individuals.Humanosphere publishes an excerpt of the very funny new book, Expat Etiquette: How to Look Good in Bad Places.Picture of the WeekSee the rest of the 2014 National Geographic traveler contest photo winners here.


Now that’s what I call transformation: Latin America then and now, and Tony Benn RIP

For those of you yet to join the twitterati, here are two images that went viral when I tweeted them recently. First up, the presidents of Brazil, Argentina and Chile, now v 1970s (h/t @rabble). Amazing, eh? It’s actually a bit messier than that- the three military dudes are all Chilean (Messr…


“Digital pandemics”: Lessons from the anti-vaccine movement

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Guest blogger: Brittany Seymour, DDS, MPH During the 20th century alone, the world experienced a larger gain in life expectancy than in all the previously accumulated history of humankind. This triumph has been dubbed one of the greatest achievements in global health and is largely attributed to the 20th century success of vaccines. However, a digital assault (one that began with autism but has ballooned to numerous other concerns) regarding the safety and importance of vaccines has permeated the Internet. Anti-vaccine sentiments, derived from this study – now retracted – perpetuated by celebrities such as Jenny McCarthy and Kristin Cavallari, and other concerned citizens, have gone viral.