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Child mortality worldwide is down, but it’s not always clear why

Somali mother cradles her malnourished, ill child UN Child mortality is widely recognized as an indicator of a community’s overall health, with reductions in child deaths often cited as evidence of the impact of a particular intervention. Two high-profile events in Washington, DC, and Johannesburg, South Africa recently celebrated the progress made worldwide in reducing maternal … Continue reading →

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The west’s peanut butter bias chokes Haiti’s attempts to feed itself | Rashmee Roshan Lall

Rashmee Rosahn Lall, Guardian Development Network | “Local provider of food to tackle malnourishment faces closure because aid agencies buy subsidised products from abroad.” The west’s Read More

Ebola

West Africa’s Ebola epidemic: preventable?

Lisa Denney, Poverty Matters | “The gaps in Sierra Leone’s health system reflect need for support so that such diseases do not wreak havoc in Read More

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Child mortality worldwide is down, but it’s not always clear why

World map

Somali mother cradles her malnourished, ill child UN Child mortality is widely recognized as an indicator of a community’s overall health, with reductions in child deaths often cited as evidence of the impact of a particular intervention. Two high-profile events in Washington, DC, and Johannesburg, South Africa recently celebrated the progress made worldwide in reducing maternal … Continue reading →


Article: Can Aid Donors Help Support LGBT Rights in Developing Countries?

Rachel Hammonds reflects on Monday’s half-day event at ODI exploring whether international aid can play a role in defending lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) rights in developing countries. The 7 July Overseas Development Institute (ODI) conference addressing this issue was a lively, thought provoking event. The excellent chairing by the witty Simon Fanshawe (Kaleidoscope Trust) ensured that the packed panels (7 minutes per speaker!) progressed more smoothly than my fraught Channel crossing Eurostar ordeal involving over eight hours of delays. LGBT Discrimination – a Trojan Horse? Jessica Horn (African based women’s rights consultant) argued persuasively that the choice to discriminate is a political one and that LGBT-phobia is a Trojan Horse through which African leaders can distract voters and restrict debate on other power related issues.  Several panellists suggested that Western grandstanding helps further polarize the issue and is counterproductive.  There was much agreement that it is time for Westerners to get off the moral high horse and quietly fund the priorities of grass roots activists and engage with global and regional mechanisms like the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights.


The west’s peanut butter bias chokes Haiti’s attempts to feed itself | Rashmee Roshan Lall

haiti flag

Rashmee Rosahn Lall, Guardian Development Network | “Local provider of food to tackle malnourishment faces closure because aid agencies buy subsidised products from abroad.” The west’s Read More


West Africa’s Ebola epidemic: preventable?

Ebola

Lisa Denney, Poverty Matters | “The gaps in Sierra Leone’s health system reflect need for support so that such diseases do not wreak havoc in Read More


Building Health Systems’ Capacity Can Prevent Future Health Emergencies

The Guardian: Ebola cannot be cured but West Africa’s epidemic may have been preventable Lisa Denney, research fellow in the politics and governance program at the Overseas Development Institute “…[Ebola] is plaguing three of the countries least equipped to cope with it [-- Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone]. … To bring the virus under control,…More


Linezolid: Affordable generic access win highlights obstacles to life-saving treatment

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With side effects that include stomach pain, vision problems, vomiting, diarrhea,  and anemia as well as pain, weakness, and numbness in hands and feet, linezolid is not something you would take if you had much choice. But for patients in Khayelishta, a township in South Africa’s Western Cape where rates of poverty, HIV and tuberculosis […](Read more…)


The implications of the Indonesian presidential elections for its national health insurance

Remco van de Pas, researcher international health policies, ITM & Trevino Pakasi, researcher Center for Research and Integrated Development of Tropical Health and Infectious Disease, University of Indonesia                                                        The citizens of the Republic of Indonesia, a vast country with over 250 million inhabitants, have an important presidential election ahead of them on the 9th of July 2014. After 10 years of government under the current president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, next week’s election provides the voters with two distinct political options for the nation. Without going too much into the details of the electoral system, the choice will be between two candidates (and their vices). The first is Prabowo Subianto, a former commander of the special armed forces. The second is Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, the current governor of Jakarta


South Sudan Needs Help to Avoid Collapse | allAfrica.com

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allAfrica.com: Juba — South Sudan’s government admitted on Monday that it needs international assistance to avoid collapse in the coming months triggered by the outbreak Read More


Mind the gap: why UN development goals must tackle economic inequality

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By Faiza Shaheen This month we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to force our governments to face up to an uncomfortable reality – that promises ofsustainable Read More


How do “fast-track” countries reduce maternal and child mortality rates?

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By Carole Presern: Social and economic development is a mysterious business. In some low- and middle-income countries, economic growth brings very little change to the lives Read More


Polio, MDGs, UHC, and more: WHO Bulletin July 2014

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In this month’s bulletin: • Why polio is a public health emergency of international concern• Factors that predict success in meeting MDG 4 and 5• Read More


USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children

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June 26, 2014 USAID will spend up to $2.9 billion of the agency’s resources to continue the fight for maternal and child health in 24 countries. From VOA: While child deaths have dropped from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012, 16,000 children and 800 mothers are dying every day, says the U.S. […]The post The Daily Impact: USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


The Dangers of Drug Resistance – Guest Post by Margaret Variano

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The threat of drug-resistance is a public health concern across a range of medications, with very severe implications. The spread of drug-resistance is particularly troubling Read More


Slipping through the Cracks: Indigenous Languages and Medical Missions in Guatemala

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Over the last several years, through work with community-based health programs and research as a medical anthropologist, I have visited dozens of medical and surgical Read More


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