Surveillance

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Photo: PATH/Lynn Heinisch.

Lessons from the front lines

In the midst of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a 21-year-old Guinean student came to a Dakar health clinic with symptoms of fever and diarrhea. The doctor considered Ebola, which had killed more than 1,000 people in neighboring Guinea. But the patient wasn’t bleeding. He denied having been in contact with Ebola patients […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesIn Davos, Rx for epidemics: tech partnershipsInnovation is at the heart of SeattleOur 8 favorite photos of 2016 ;

Research Training in Limited-Resource Settings: A Call for Equitable Partnerships

Dr. Jim Kim, the president of the World Bank and one of the founders of Partners in Health, recently gave a talk about changing the Read More

Mapping the Zambian prison health system: An analysis of key structural determinants

10.1080/17441692.2016.1202298<br/>Stephanie M.

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Global monitoring of safety of immunization in pregnancy

View original post here –  Harmonized Safety Monitoring of Immunization in Pregnancy- the Global Alignment of Immunization…


2016 Cures Act, FDA Reforms Could Help Streamline, Strengthen R&D Efforts To Find New…

Wall Street Journal: The Superbug Dirty Dozen Editorial Board “…[T]he superbug problem has been well understood and managed since the George W. Bush administration. CDC surveillance, physician education, and infection-control protocols have led to more prudent use of antibiotics. … Still, a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association last year estimated that…More


Africa CDC In ‘Unique Position’ To Promote African Public Health But Uncertainty Over…

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: A new day for African public health Editorial Board “…The [Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC)] is Africa’s first continent-wide public health agency … The aim of the Africa CDC will be to establish early warning and response surveillance systems, respond to emergencies, build capacity, and provide technical…More


Lessons from the front lines

Photo: PATH/Lynn Heinisch.

In the midst of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a 21-year-old Guinean student came to a Dakar health clinic with symptoms of fever and diarrhea. The doctor considered Ebola, which had killed more than 1,000 people in neighboring Guinea. But the patient wasn’t bleeding. He denied having been in contact with Ebola patients […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesIn Davos, Rx for epidemics: tech partnershipsInnovation is at the heart of SeattleOur 8 favorite photos of 2016 ;


Challenges to conducting epidemiology research in chronic conflict areas: examples from PURE-…

Little has been written on the challenges of conducting research in regions or countries with chronic conflict and strife.


Global Rapid Responders- Our Boots on the Ground Defense

Ashley Greiner (Global RRT Tier 1 Emergency Public Health Epidemiologist) worked long hours in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew. Dr. Greiner is seen here checking samples labels before sending them to the Port au Prince national laboratory for testing in October 2016 (Photo courtesy of Coralie Giese) Because our world is more connected than ever, a disease threat that occurs anywhere can very quickly spread across boundaries and become a threat to people worldwide. New microbes are emerging and spreading, drug resistance is rising, and limited biosafety and security measures in laboratories around the world make the intentional or unintentional release of dangerous microbes easier.


Alternative transmission routes in the malaria elimination era: an overview of…

Transfusion-transmitted (TT) malaria is an alternative infection route that has gained little attention from authorities, despite representing a life-threatening condition.


Raising the red flag for malaria elimination and integrated fever surveillance in the…

In the past decade, Brazil has achieved considerable progress in malaria control, with 140 000 cases reported in 2015, the lowest numbers since 1980.1 Part of this success has been attributed to the establishment of a large network of around 3000 diagnostic and treatment units for malaria.1 A remarkable feature is that these services are provided for free as part of the public universal health-care system (Sistema Único de Saúde [SUS]) and cover rural and riverine areas in the Amazon region—where more than 83% of malaria transmission occurs.


Prevalence and Risk Factors for Scrub Typhus in South India

Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of scub typhus in Tamil Nadu, South India.


Surveillance Systems Key To Decreasing Cancer Burden, CDC Officer Says

CDC’s “Our Global Voices”: The Stakes are High, the Goal the Same — Overcome Cancer Elizabeth Van Dyne, Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer in the CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control’s Office of International Cancer Control, writes, “Being at CDC and visiting different countries has shown me that surveillance systems such as cancer registries…More


The Stakes are High, the Goal the Same – Overcome Cancer

As a pediatric oncologist, I have sat across from a family and told them the heart wrenching news that their child has cancer. Many families tell me later that this was the worst day of their lives. Although I was the bearer of bad news, I had a strong oncology training, a collaborative team of healthcare professionals with multidisciplinary backgrounds, and the resources to help many families beat cancer. The U.S. has had many cancer treatment success stories where people can live long healthy lives after a diagnosis.


New Issue Of NIH Fogarty International Center’s ‘Global Health Matters’ Available Online

NIH Fogarty International Center: Global Health Matters The most recent issue of the Fogarty International Center’s newsletter contains various articles addressing global health issues, including a profile of Paul Farmer’s advocacy of global health equity and an article examining the use of “big data” in infectious disease surveillance and modeling (January/February 2017).


Evaluating Hospital-Based Surveillance for Outbreak Detection in Bangladesh: Analysis of…

by Birgit Nikolay, Henrik Salje, Katharine Sturm-Ramirez, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Nusrat Homaira, Makhdum Ahmed, A. Danielle Iuliano, Repon C. Paul, Mahmudur Rahman, M. Jahangir Hossain, Stephen P.


Register Now to Learn How to Use Mobile Phones for Public Health

In 2016, the number of global mobile subscriptions reached 8.5 billion — more than the number of people on this earth – yet at the same time, health systems around the world are struggling to: Provide access to affordable healthcare for all Treat infectious diseases such as Ebola, HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis Address crippling maternal and child mortality rates in low-income countries Manage non-communicable diseases like heart disease, cancer, and Diabetes Tackle infrastructure and supply chain challenges in remote settings Train frontline health workers to provide care to vulnerable populations Mobile phones are increasingly central to solutions responding to these challenges – are you ready to leverage mHealth innovations in your programs? TechChange is excited to announce its first online certificate course of 2017: Mobile Phones for Public Health. Use code ICTWorks to get a $50 discount on any TechChange course! The four-week Mobile Phones for Public Health course kicks off on February 6th and will feature leading guest experts, case studies, interactive software demos on the latest mHealth topics and developments. We’ve also been working on a new studio set-up to make live recordings all the more engaging


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