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Photo: PATH/Lynn Heinisch.

Lessons from the front lines

In the midst of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a 21-year-old Guinean student came to a Dakar health clinic with symptoms of fever and diarrhea. The doctor considered Ebola, which had killed more than 1,000 people in neighboring Guinea. But the patient wasn’t bleeding. He denied having been in contact with Ebola patients […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesIn Davos, Rx for epidemics: tech partnershipsInnovation is at the heart of SeattleOur 8 favorite photos of 2016 ;

Research Training in Limited-Resource Settings: A Call for Equitable Partnerships

Dr. Jim Kim, the president of the World Bank and one of the founders of Partners in Health, recently gave a talk about changing the Read More

Mapping the Zambian prison health system: An analysis of key structural determinants

10.1080/17441692.2016.1202298<br/>Stephanie M.

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The Case for Global Health Security

Maureen Bartee Finding and stopping disease outbreaks at the earliest possible moment no matter where they emerge is important: to reduce illness and death, increase national security, and maintain economic gains made over the previous decades. Disease threats, after all, require only the smallest opening to take root and spread. In today’s tightly connected world a disease can be transported from an isolated, rural village to any major city in as little as 36 hours. Sadly, we also have to consider the possibility of bad actors gaining access to and disseminating dangerous pathogens, a development which could have serious implications not only on people’s health but on the stability and security of entire populations. The recent Zika virus and Ebola outbreaks remind us that health threats are not limited to one country, one issue, or one pathogen


CDC Continues the Fight Against Polio

In 1988, when CDC joined three other partners to launch the ambitious Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), the world was a much different and, measured by polio’s reach, dangerous place. Rebecca Martin, PhD, Director, CDC Center for Global Health Back then, polio existed in more than 125 countries and it paralyzed 350,000 children that year. Thanks to GPEI and the tireless work of its current partners – the World Health Organization, Rotary International, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and CDC – by 2005 polio was eliminated in all but four countries– Pakistan, Nigeria, India, and Afghanistan. In 2011, India conquered poliovirus, leaving only three endemic countries.


4 Steps Necessary To Implement ‘Precision Public Health’ In Developing Nations

Nature: Four steps to precision public health Scott F. Dowell, deputy director for surveillance and epidemiology; David Blazes, senior program officer for surveillance and epidemiology; and Susan Desmond-Hellmann, chief executive, all at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “…The use of data to guide interventions that benefit populations more efficiently is a strategy we call…More


Choose the Road to Zero Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

  The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims takes place every third Sunday in November. It serves as a way to: Remember the millions of people killed and injured in road crashes as well as their families, friends and those affected; Pay tribute to the dedicated emergency responders, police and medical professionals who deal with the traumatic aftermath of road death and injury; Remind the international community, governments and individual members of society of their responsibility to make roads safer. According to the World Health Organization, about 1.25 million people die each year globally as a result of road traffic crashes. Road traffic injuries represent the leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29 years. More than 90% of the world’s road fatalities occur in low- and middle-income countries, even though these countries have approximately half of the world’s vehicles.


Measles: A Forgotten, but Formidable Foe

James L. Goodson, MPH, Senior Measles Scientist at CDC Since its inception, the CDC has played a major role in advancing the health security in dozens of countries by improving response times to the outbreaks of several vaccine-preventable diseases. Furthermore, its partnerships with other countries and philanthropic organizations have not only stopped outbreaks, but also improved disease surveillance, laboratory science, emergency operations, and health systems overall. This along with the significant progress made towards the eradication of polio gives us plenty of reasons to celebrate, but that celebration would be premature. Between the anticipation of polio eradication in the near future and the response to emerging diseases like Zika, measles has become a forgotten, but formidable foe.


Internet Data Can Provide Information To Assist Disease Outbreak Preparedness, Response, Study…

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: Can big data fill gaps in epidemic awareness, responses? Researchers say yes, with caveats Antigone Barton, senior editor and writer of “Science Speaks,” discusses an article published this week in a Journal of Infectious Diseases supplement examining the use of “big data” in infectious disease surveillance. The article…More


World Polio Day 2016: A Focus on Tenacity and Hope

Rebecca Martin, PhD, Director, Center for Global Health John Bingham is an American writer and long distance runner who’s competed in more than 45 marathons. He has no connection whatsoever to global health. Nor does he claim any history or involvement with the difficult but ever hopeful struggle to eradicate polio from every corner of the world. So it might seem odd that Bingham’s words come to mind today, World Polio Day, as an apt and perfectly relevant call to action in our efforts to defeat polio. “Marathons,” he wrote, “are about tenacity as much as talent.” We have made remarkable progress in our goal to eradicate polio, but if we are to close the last, small but stubborn distance between a world with polio and one without, we should heed Bingham’s advice


President Obama Cements Global Health Security Agenda as a National Priority

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden In the swirl of world events that range from economic uncertainty to continuing unease about terrorism, President Obama took an important step today to strengthen our ability to protect people in the United States and around the world from disease outbreaks. Today, President Obama signed an Executive Order that cements the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) as a national, presidential-level priority and establishes the United States as a committed, long-term catalyst for achieving the promise and protections that GHSA holds. This is good news. In today’s increasingly interconnected world, distance no longer protects us from disease.


Testing moms to stop syphilis in newborns

Last week, on the heels of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s newest surveillance report on sexually transmitted infections, a little-known infection affecting newborns made news. Congenital syphilis, a condition where pregnant women pass syphilis to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth, is on the rise in the United States. During 2015, 487 cases […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesThe multidimensional fight against polioThe essential fight for positive changeThe race to immunize a country—and a little girl named Precious ;


6% Of New TB Infections In West Africa Resistant To Drugs, New Research Shows

The Guardian: Multidrug-resistant TB rates soaring in West Africa, WHO warns “…Until now, the World Health Organization has had to rely on estimates for MDR-TB in West Africa because the data has not been collected or reliable. But a new surveillance network across eight countries in the region has found that drug resistance is a…More


ONE Blog Post Discusses Challenges Of TB Surveillance, Treatment, Prevention

ONE Campaign: 5 things to know about the number one infectious killer in the world Jenny Ottenhoff, global health policy director at ONE, and Spencer Crawford, global health research assistant at ONE, discuss why ending TB remains elusive, including challenges involved with surveillance, drug resistance, and funding shortfalls (10/25).


WHO Warns Number Of Zika Cases Expected To Continue Rising In Asia-Pacific Region

Associated Press: WHO sees further rise of Zika cases in Asia-Pacific region “Zika infections are expected to continue rising in the Asia-Pacific region, where authorities are increasing surveillance, preparing responses to complications, and collaborating on information about the disease, the World Health Organization said Monday…” (10/10).


Strengthening Health Care, Surveillance Systems Critical To National, Global Security

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: Treat global health crises the same way as national security crises, panel says Rabita Aziz, policy research coordinator for the Center for Global Health Policy, discusses remarks made by panelists at the launch of a Brenthurst Foundation report on the West African Ebola outbreak. Panelists discussed the importance…More


Report Examines Data Collected During West African Ebola Epidemic, Lessons Learned From…

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: Ebola responders analyze data from the last outbreak to prepare for the next Antigone Barton, senior editor and writer of “Science Speaks,” discusses a report published in Global Health and Science Practice, titled “Successful Implementation of a Multicountry Clinical Surveillance and Data Collection System for Ebola Virus Disease…More


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