Poverty

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The burden of the gift of aid

The splendor of Lake Atitlán is unreal. No water should be so blue, no sky so clear, no hills so lush. The lake is a Read More

To Use or Not to Use: the Clinical Dilemma of Antimicrobials

    Understandably frustrated after 4 weeks of mild coughing, a nicely dressed businesswoman had come for an evaluation. I looked for infection in her Read More

What do we palliate? Caring for the sick and the poor

José1 is a man in his sixties from rural Guatemala with cancer spread to his bones. He describes deep aches of his shoulders and hips, Read More

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CGD’s Charles Kenny’s New Book Examines Foreign Aid, Corruption, Development Measurements

Center for Global Development “Views from the Center”: Do Weak Governments Doom Developing Countries to Poverty? Charles Kenny, senior fellow at CGD, writes, “When you read what economists have to say about development, it is easy to be disheartened about the prospects for poor countries. One big reason is that slow changing institutional factors are…More


BRICS Countries Can Lead Global Efforts To Meet Hunger-, Poverty-Related Goals By 2030

Inter Press Service: BRICS to Lead World’s Efforts to Eradicate Hunger, Poverty by 2030 “With the clock ticking toward the 2030 deadline for meeting the international goals to eradicate hunger and poverty, five of the world’s most important emerging economies are well-positioned to take a leading role in helping to achieve these objectives, according to…More


1 In 5 Children In Wealthy Nations Live In Poverty, UNICEF Report Shows

Deutsche Welle: UNICEF: 20 percent of children in developed countries living in poverty “…The U.N. children’s agency UNICEF has warned that its report should serve as a ‘wake-up call’ to the high rate of children in rich countries living in relative poverty. The report makes clear that ‘higher incomes do not automatically lead to improved…More


Vietnam’s financial inclusion priorities: Expanding financial services and moving to a…

It’s nighttime and the streets are bustling in Vietnam’s cities and towns. Buoyed by years of strong growth, the country has a burgeoning middle class with purchasing power to sustain restaurants and cafes, full and open late into the night, busy retailers and a high penetration of mobile phones – more than one per person. The economy, however, continues to run on cash and a majority of adults still don’t have formal financial services such as a basic transaction account. Moving to a “non-cash” system is a priority for the government to increase efficiency, promote business and economic development and reduce poverty including in remote rural areas where traditional financial providers have difficulty reaching.


Are good school principals born or can they be made?

Good principals can make a big difference “It is widely believed that a good principal is the key to a successful school.” So say Branch, Hanushek, and Rivkin in their study of school principals on learning productivity. But how do you measure this? Using a database from Texas in the United States, they employ a value-added approach analogous to that used to measure performance among teachers. They control for basic information on student backgrounds (gender, ethnicity, and an indicator of poverty) as well as student test scores from the previous year.


The secret, hidden pricetag on your cola bottle

0000-0002-1767-4576The line at the convenience store is three people deep. Standing in front of me is a 40-something man with a bottle of cola and a newspaper. In front of him, a mother paying her utility bill accompanied by her young daughter. The mum and child leave, and the man moves forward to pay. “Two dollars?” I overhear him exclaim with surprise… “I remember when a bottle of cola was one!” As he pays and heads for the door, I too grab a newspaper and cannot help but notice the story on the front cover: the mounting crisis of costs from an obesity epidemic gripping not just the nation, but the planet – the economic and health systems already struggling to keep pace.


Trump Administration’s Withdrawal From Paris Climate Agreement Could Harm Poverty Reduction…

IRIN: Trump’s climate pullout could spell disaster for developing nations “U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to start the withdrawal process from the Paris Agreement could come at a high price for the developing world, setting back years of progress not only on climate change but also on poverty eradication, experts warn. … The ‘America first’…More


Trump Administration’s Withdrawal From Paris Climate Agreement Will Weaken U.S. Status As…

Devex: Development experts dismayed as U.S. exits Paris climate agreement “Development organizations and environmental groups reacted with dismay to President Donald Trump’s decision to leave the landmark Paris Agreement, warning that the exit would weaken the United States’ standing as a global development leader, and, ultimately, derail crucial progress on climate change and global poverty…More


Can you make a #Loop4Dev? Join our cities boomerang challenge!

Ever notice how cities can really encapsulate many of the things that make life enjoyable? Green spaces to enjoy the outdoors, access to jobs, affordable housing for all, a well-connected public transportation system, access to healthy food, schools for all children, and so on. Some cities achieve this better than others, but creating a city that works for all of its citizens can be a challenge for governments and communities alike. Why? Let’s look at some numbers: Up to 1 billion people living in slums in the cities of the world are in need of better services; Cities consume 2/3 of the world’s energy and account for 70% of greenhouse gas emissions; 66 out of 100 people will live in cities by 2050, which tells us the global population is becoming increasingly urban


World No Tobacco Day 2017

Dear Tobacco Industry Executives, We share a dream that this World No Tobacco Day will be a day like no other. Usually the focus of World No Tobacco Day is based on the fact that 7 million of your most loyal customers will die this year from tobacco use. There will be calls to raise the price of tobacco as this is the singular most important measure in reducing tobacco consumption. There will be calls to use some of these taxes to support smokers to quit by investing the funds in proven measures such as public education campaigns and quit lines. There will be calls to follow the lead of Australia, France, and the UK in implementing plain packaging to ban advertising of tobacco and to mandate smokefree environments.


On World No Tobacco Day 2017, WHO Calls On Governments To Implement Strong Tobacco Control…

WHO: World No Tobacco Day 2017: Beating tobacco for health, prosperity, the environment and national development “Action to stamp out tobacco use can help countries prevent millions of people falling ill and dying from tobacco-related disease, combat poverty, and, according to a first-ever WHO report, reduce large-scale environmental degradation. On World No Tobacco Day 2017,…More


“Appendix III” is critical for accelerating progress on NCDs

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 70% of global deaths in 2015, with three quarters of these deaths occurring in low and middle income countries (LMICs). NCDs are a silent epidemic of premature and preventable death and disability from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and mental and neurological disorders. Their main risk factors – unhealthy diets, alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity, and environmental determinants such as air pollution, are transmitted via unhealthy environments. They are directly and indirectly caused by commercial determinants, misaligned public policies in agriculture, commerce, education, energy, health, finance, trade, and social security, and are exacerbated by social determinants including poverty and inequity. In 2011, The United Nations General Assembly declared NCDs a global health and development challenge at a UN High-Level Summit.


Can you make a #Loop4Dev? Our Cities Boomerang Challenge

Ever notice how cities can really encapsulate many of the things that make life enjoyable? Green spaces to enjoy the outdoors, access to jobs, affordable housing for all, a well-connected public transportation system, access to healthy food, schools for all children, and so on. Some cities achieve this better than others, but creating a city that works for all of its citizens can be a challenge for governments and communities alike. Why? Let’s look at some numbers: Up to 1 billion people living in slums in the cities of the world are in need of better services; Cities consume 2/3 of the world’s energy and account for 70% of greenhouse gas emissions; 66 out of 100 people will live in cities by 2050, which tells us the global population is becoming increasingly urban.


Disaster risk management a top priority on the international stage this week

How many school children can be endangered by the schools themselves? The answer was over 600,000 in metropolitan Lima alone. In the region, fraught with frequent seismic activity, nearly two-thirds of schools were highly vulnerable to damage by earthquakes. Working with the Peruvian Ministry of Education (MINEDU), the World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) conducted a risk assessment that ultimately helped make an estimated 2.5 million children safer and paved the way for a $3.1 billion national risk-reduction strategy. Whether it is building safer schools or deploying early warning systems, disaster risk management is an integral part of caring for our most vulnerable, combating poverty, and protecting development gains


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