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To Use or Not to Use: the Clinical Dilemma of Antimicrobials

    Understandably frustrated after 4 weeks of mild coughing, a nicely dressed businesswoman had come for an evaluation. I looked for infection in her Read More

A Quiet Crisis: Reproductive Health Among Displaced Syrians

Every day, almost 500 women die during pregnancy or childbirth in humanitarian settings. Additionally, nearly sixty percent of preventable maternal deaths take place in regions Read More

A Medical Provider’s Perspective on Treating Undocumented U.S. Immigrants

As I was writing this article I received a message from a medical friend in the Midwest regarding one of her patients: “Liz, I need Read More

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The Syrian public health and humanitarian crisis: A ‘displacement’ in global governance?

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Trump Administration’s Immigration Ban Could Negatively Impact Disease, Vaccine Research,…

International Business Times: Will Trump Cause Next Ebola Crisis? Immigration Ban Could Hurt Disease, Vaccine Research “President Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban has been met with significant opposition over the effect critics say it will have on immigrants and refugees. But the ban could also propose a significant problem for Americans by limiting the foreign…More


An Overview: Exploring Development Aid and Migration

This blog post explores the relationship between the history of international development aid and migration. My previous posts have focused on high-level meetings and policies used as guidelines to advocate for development effectiveness and cooperation in the international aid and development sector. At a time when the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been rolled out to countries to make sure “no country is left behind,” nations have a shared framework to guide them and make sure their development policies support activities that lead to outcomes such as poverty alleviation, job creation, and sustainable communities. Additionally, the aim of development effectiveness and cooperation is to provide accountability for donors and financing agencies as countries move forward with their national agendas.


Joint Statement on Syria

DAVOS, Switzerland – While efforts to fully implement a ceasefire in Syria continue, we again appeal for immediate, unconditional, and safe access to reach the children and families who are still cut off from humanitarian aid across the country.


A Quiet Crisis: Reproductive Health Among Displaced Syrians

Every day, almost 500 women die during pregnancy or childbirth in humanitarian settings. Additionally, nearly sixty percent of preventable maternal deaths take place in regions Read More


Weekly links November 11: new research round-up, small sample experiments, refugee research,…

The weekly FAIV from the Financial Access Initiative has a nice round-up of some of the exciting new papers presented at this year’s NEUDC Chris Blattman’s plethora of job market advice. Trade Diversion’s list of trade job market papers this year. Mathematica’s John Deke on “ big surprises on small experiments” argues that it can be possible to do credible randomized trials with only 6 to 10 clusters under some conditions. A new CEPR e-book on migration and refugees has lots of short succinct summaries of important research.


Why resettlement is not the solution to the world’s refugee crisis

Original post:  Why resettlement is not the solution to the world’s refugee crisis


Where do the world’s talents immigrate to?

“We’re the nation that just had six of our scientists and researchers win Nobel Prizes—and every one of them was an immigrant,” U.S. President Barack Obama recently said after the Nobel Prize winners were announced. The Internet was abuzz about it, and how could it not be? The announcement couldn’t come at a better time. Not only are US Nobel laureates immigrants, but also the country has been identified as one of four where the world’s high-skilled immigrants are increasingly living, according to a new World Bank research article


News in the Humanosphere: Humanitarian pause starts in Aleppo, U.N. hopes to evacuate civilians

A “humanitarian pause” in the Syrian army’s Russian-backed assault on Aleppo took effect Thursday, but despite a drop in violence there was little sign residents were heeding calls to leave. Moscow said the truce would be extended by 24 hours, and the UN said it hoped to carry out the first medical evacuations from Aleppo


The rippling effect of refugee policies

Sara Pantuliano, Managing Director of ODI, examines the ripple effect of restrictive asylum policies on poorer countries in Europe and Australia, leading to the erosion of refugee protection on a global scale. The post The rippling effect of refugee policies appeared first on WhyDev Blog.


News in the Humanosphere: France begins to clear ‘Jungle’ migrant and refugee camp

France began clearing the sprawling “Jungle” camp on Monday as many migrants who have camped for months or years among sand dunes near Calais gave up on their dreams of reaching Britain, a tantalizingly short sea crossing away. Following sporadic outbreaks of unrest overnight, the migrants chose instead with calm resignation to be relocated in


A Medical Provider’s Perspective on Treating Undocumented U.S. Immigrants

As I was writing this article I received a message from a medical friend in the Midwest regarding one of her patients: “Liz, I need Read More


The immense job of helping refugees settle into new homes

With more than 65 million people are displaced globally – the most there have been since World War II – the global refugee crisis has captured the attention of aid groups and political leaders worldwide. Efforts to address the humanitarian problem have been made on both local and international levels, leading to the global refugee summit at the


Controversy over transparency: why non-profits need to disclose their “real” overhead ratio

“The fact is an average of 91 cents of every dollar the Red Cross spends is invested in our humanitarian services and programs.”[1] This is Read More


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