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Thoughts After 22 Years of Consumption and Organizing a Food System Symposium

Sarah Dwyer is passionate about developing a multidisciplinary understanding of the ways that food affects health through her work with a community-led nutrition education program Read More

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What will it take to dismantle the power structures that perpetuate inequality and bigotry in aid, philanthropy, social enterprise, and impact investing? (Plus, a sampling of resources/conversations on solidarity.)

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A conversation with MacArthur Genius Gary Cohen of Health Care Without Harm

Gary Cohen is co-founder and president of Health Care Without Harm. His focus is global health care delivery and its role in promoting health equity, environmental Read More

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U.S. President Obama Encourages Foreign Aid Continuity At White House Global Development Summit

Devex: President Obama takes ‘victory lap’ at global development summit “President Barack Obama — and key members of his foreign policy team — enjoyed what many called a development ‘victory lap’ this week in Washington, D.C. Officials billed Wednesday’s White House Summit on Global Development as one part ‘celebration’ and one part ‘recommitment.’ In the…More


Researchers Find Evidence Zika Carried By More Common Culex Mosquitoes

Reuters: Brazil scientists find Zika traces in Culex mosquitoes in wild “Brazilian researchers on Thursday said they found signs of the Zika virus in a common mosquito that is a separate species from the insect known to be the primary means of transmission…” (Prada, 7/21). Washington Post: Zika is found in common Culex mosquitoes, signaling…More


Congress’s Response To Zika ‘Unsympathetic,’ ‘Shameful’

Baltimore Sun: Capitol Hill’s shameful indifference to Zika Editorial Board “…Only one group seems remarkably unconcerned about Zika and the threat it poses to public health: the men and women of the United States Congress who left Washington last week for a seven-week recess without approving a dime more in spending to combat Zika. ……More


Both Democrats, Republicans At Fault For Delaying Zika Response Efforts

Post and Courier: Zika aid first, politics later Editorial Board “Predictably but sadly, Congress left Washington last week without approving funding to fight the deadly Zika virus. Members are pointing to those on the other side of the aisle as the culprits. But voters should see it as a colossal failure of both sides. ……More


Sanitation investments in Ghana: An ethnographic investigation of the role of tenure security,…

Ghana’s low investment in household sanitation is evident from the low rates of improved sanitation.


Thoughts After 22 Years of Consumption and Organizing a Food System Symposium

2349807342_e88366c94f_o

Sarah Dwyer is passionate about developing a multidisciplinary understanding of the ways that food affects health through her work with a community-led nutrition education program Read More


Weekly links July 8: lions, forests, journals, and income transfers – just another Friday

Veracities on David Card and Stefano DellaVigna’s work in progress on what gets in top economic journals. They have data on submissions to top journals and assess how editor and referee assessments relate to subsequent citations. On Let’s Talk Development, Damien de Walque on giving income transfers to mothers vs fathers, and how a Belgian painting may have it all wrong. Andrew Gelman on some issues with reproducibility in economics and the reluctance of journals to consider comments. I like this: “I do think there’s an unfortunate “incumbency advantage” by which published papers with “p less than .05” are taken as true unless a large effort is amassed to take them down


Get there

Scale

What will it take to dismantle the power structures that perpetuate inequality and bigotry in aid, philanthropy, social enterprise, and impact investing? (Plus, a sampling of resources/conversations on solidarity.)


Drivers of sustained hygiene behaviour change: A case study from mid-western Nepal

Publication date: August 2016 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 163 Author(s): Celia McMichael, Priscilla Robinson Behaviour change is central to the prevention of many population health problems, yet it is typically difficult to initiate and sustain.


Weekly links July 1: UBI in India would cost a heap, war and cooperation, mobile phone panel…

Maitreesh Ghatak in the Indian Express on how much a basic income guarantee would cost in India, and whether it could be paid for. His estimate is it would cost 11% of GDP, whereas NREGA only costs 0.3%. Includes the stunning fact that “only 1 per cent of Indians actually pay income tax, while a mere 2.3 per cent file tax returns”. More on UBI: the Chicago Booth IGM economic experts panel finds US economists are overwhelmingly against a UBI in the USA From the IDB development that works blog, the Mexican government’s Self-Reported Expanded Well-Being Study (expanded BIARE) survey of 44,000 people includes measures of measures that include personal autonomy, feelings of achievement, security, affection, family, friends, or feelings about having a purpose in life. The Washington Post wonkblog summarizes the forthcoming JEP paper by Chris Blattman, Ted Miguel and co-authors on how war seems to foster cooperation in affected communities afterwards.


Erratum to: Complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions…

Read article here:  Erratum to: Complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions…


My struggles with self care

Self care is the problem, and the solution.


Venezuela ends power cuts, but poverty and hunger remain pervasive

Yesterday marked the end of a power-rationing program in territories of inner Venezuela, which began in April to reduce the country’s energy consumption. But turning the power back on is only a marginal relief when the country’s economy remains in free fall and the nation’s poor suffer from widespread hunger and malnutrition. The Plan to


My advice for future policymakers: See the public’s success as your success

The most important word in “public policy” is “public” — the people affected by the choices of policymakers. But who are these people? And what do they care most about? Policies evolve as the concerns of generations change over time. Regardless of whether you are generation X, Y, or Z, people want the same things: prosperity and dignity, equality of opportunity, justice and security.


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