Medications & Treatments

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Six Amazing Drugs in Development

Reposted with permission from Gap Medics At any one time, there are hundreds of drugs being developed around the world. Some of them could change Read More

Think scale! Engaging Private Pharmacies to Improve Public Health 

A version of this story first appeared on IDSA’s Science Speaks platform By Emily Delmotte Lisinopril 20 mg by mouth at 8am? Check. After verifying the Read More

Why smart government spending matters for the SDG medicines target

The World Health Organization’s first global report on diabetes  highlights the disease’s “alarming surge” with rates that have quadrupled in fewer than three decades. The report reminds us Read More

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Point-of-care C-reactive protein testing to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics…

C-reactive protein point-of-care testing reduced antibiotic use for non-severe acute respiratory tract infection without compromising patients’ recovery in primary health care in Vietnam. Health-care providers might have become familiar with the clinical picture of low C-reactive protein, leading to reduction in antibiotic prescribing in both groups, but this would have led to a reduction in observed effect, rather than overestimation. Qualitative analysis is needed to address differences in context in order to implement this strategy to improve rational antibiotic use for patients with acute respiratory infection in low-income and middle-income countries.


Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of…

by Sanne Terryn, Aurélie Francart, Heidi Rommelaere, Catelijne Stortelers, Steven Van Gucht Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently.


AIDS 2016: How Seattle scientists’ frustration turns to hope in hunt for an HIV vaccine

Editors note: As part of our coverage of the 21st International AIDS Conference, we are reposting part two of a series from the Seattle Times about the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s effort to find an effective HIV vaccine. View the full report here. By Nina Shapiro, Seattle Times staff reporter CAPE TOWN, South Africa


AIDS 2016: Plenary talk proposes $90, $90, $90 as cost of HIV and viral hepatitis drugs

Categories: AIDS2016DURBAN, South Africa – Today’s plenary session today saw a new 90-90-90 goal set in a talk on tuberculosis and viral hepatitis today: $90 for HIV treatment, $90 for hepatitis B treatment and $90 for hepatitis C cure. Dr.Anton Pozniak, the director of HIV services at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Trust in London, issued the challenge. The hepatitis […](Read more…)


Bringing good things to life? GE in Africa

When I am looking for information about health in developing countries that is not available in the usual media outlets, covering stories less spectacular than the outbreak of the latest infectious threat, I have sometimes turned to AllAfrica.com. Certainly in the past, you could find issues related to bioethics of regional and local concern, say nurses strikes or clean water insecurity. Turning to AllAfrica.com for the first time in awhile, and wandering over to the fancier-looking Health webpage, my eye fell on an article entitled “Our Generation Will See Healthcare in Africa on a Par With the Rest of the World.” This is global bioethics click-bait.Turns out the article is written by the President and CEO of GE Healthcare. GE, or General Electric, is one of the biggest multinational corporations in the world in terms of gross revenue and profitability.


AIDS 2016: Medicines? Check! People to deliver them? Not so much . . .

Categories: AIDS2016, FeaturedDURBAN, South Africa – Dr. Carlos del Rio, chairman of the HIV Medicine Association, chairman of the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, has a pair of maps he shows medical students entering the field of infectious diseases. One shows the countries of the world sized according to the numbers of adults living with […](Read more…)


Fixed-dose combination antibiotics in India: global perspectives

On March 10, 2016, the Indian Government banned around 330 “irrational” fixed-dose combination drugs (FDCs) with immediate effect. FDCs are products that contain two or more active drugs in a fixed-dose ratio, and are useful for minimising pill burden and lowering cost. However, FDCs should ideally contain constituents that act via different mechanisms and do not cause additive toxic effects. An FDC is described as irrational if these conditions are not met. The government’s decision was influenced by reports expressing concern about the safety and efficacy of FDCs manufactured in India.


AIDS 2016: TB preconference highlights response stymied by neglect of patient needs and…

Categories: AIDS2016DURBAN, South Africa –  Calling for change in approaches to tuberculosis to address poverty, malnutrition and human rights, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease leader Jose Luis Castro, at a pre-conference event here Saturday, urged TB responders globally to embrace patient-centered approaches and language. That includes ending the use of nomenclature such as “TB suspect” and TB defaulters,” […](Read more…)


Ahead Of International AIDS Meeting, TB2016 Conference Gathers Scientists, Advocates To Examine…

Science Speaks: AIDS 2016: TB preconference highlights response stymied by neglect of patient needs and research funding deficits “Calling for change in approaches to tuberculosis to address poverty, malnutrition, and human rights, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease leader Jose Luis Castro, at a pre-conference event [in Durban] Saturday, urged TB responders globally to…More


U.S. State Department Calls On Private Sector To Develop Tools To Prevent, Treat Zika

Devex: U.S. government looks to private sector for Zika tools “The U.S. State Department is reaching out to private sector partners to help the Obama administration devise new tools to control and treat the Zika virus outbreak in the Americas. On Wednesday, the Secretary of State’s Office of Global Partnerships held roundtable discussions with business…More


Why smart government spending matters for the SDG medicines target

The World Health Organization’s first global report on diabetes  highlights the disease’s “alarming surge” with rates that have quadrupled in fewer than three decades. The report reminds us Read More


WHO Director Of Essential Medicines Discusses Agency’s Plan To Devise Fair Drug Pricing Model

STAT: Q&A: Why the World Health Organization plans a fair pricing model for drugs “Over the next year, the World Health Organization wants to develop a fair pricing model for pharmaceuticals. … The trick is to find the right balance between access to affordable medicines and enticing companies to develop new and improved medicines, while…More


India Should Reject Western Influences Urging Modifications To Its Drug Patent Laws

The Hill: Doctors Without Borders to India: Protect the ‘pharmacy of the developing world’ Judit Rius Sanjuan, U.S. manager and legal policy adviser for the Access Campaign at Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) “…In recent years, MSF has grown increasingly alarmed with the escalating efforts of U.S. industry groups, … which demand the White House and…More


Reflections on a year of malnutrition

Malnutrition is frustrating. I often sit in the office, analyzing data from our programs, and feel helpless. Children who stay the same height for two Read More


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