Monitoring & Evaluation

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How to Create an Effective Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

In recent years, organizations and employees are being measured not on their stories, but on their numbers. When you introduce your organization, people will always ask you about your numbers – What’s your reach? What’s your impact? Meanwhile, funders and senior management are running after the concepts of big data – year-over-year increase in reach, impact measurements, geographic comparisons, and more. The MERL Tech conference is returning on October 3-4, 2016

“Beyond Africa”: A Glimpse into AidData’s Forthcoming Dataset on Chinese Financing in…

China’s economic growth depends on its ability to secure natural resources. Many are found in environmentally-sensitive areas, which are rich in biodiversity, vulnerable populations, and sources of freshwater – and Chinese development projects. China is using these projects as a way to secure access to the resources it needs. But,

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How to Help Community-Based mHealth Programs Collect High-Quality Data

As health programs are relying more on decentralized models of care, mHealth has made it easier to collect, manage and store community-level health data. This data can feed into national health information systems and be used to inform decision making for improved service delivery at the community level. But how can we ensure that our community-based mHealth programs are collecting accurate, high-quality data that will help us deliver the right services to the right places at the right time? We at MEASURE Evaluation have developed the mobile community based health information system (CBHIS) data quality assessment toolkit to allow programs and projects to rapidly assess the ability of their mobile data systems to collect, manage, and report high-quality community-based data. We recently had the opportunity to present our toolkit for the first time to a group of participants at the MERL Tech Conference.


Data Transparency, Accountability ‘Vital’ To Addressing Global Health Threats

Huffington Post: Greater Transparency Called for in Global Health Security Jonathan D. Quick, senior fellow at Management Science for Health (MSH) “No More Epidemics is calling on all countries to publish their completed assessments of national capacities to prevent, detect, and respond to epidemic threats, known as the Joint External Evaluation (JEE). … Unless these…More


Please Help USAID Develop Responsible Data Practices for Digital Development

Are you managing personally identifiable data? Have you struggled with the need to share, yet protect sensitive data? Do you worry about privacy risks and want to help create best practices? Then apply now to engage with USAID on the ethical collection, use, and management of data for field-based programs. The Global Development Lab at USAID is working with mSTAR, Sonjara, and Georgetown University is conducting research to develop responsible data guidelines for USAID and they are seeking development projects to test their ideas with real world experiences to help: Mitigate privacy and security risks for constituents and others Improve performance and development outcomes through use of data Promote transparency, accountability and public good through open data Research teams will conduct field visits with selected projects, and work with the project management team to apply draft practice guidelines to each case, helping identify what practices work and any gaps in the guidelines


Are Messaging Apps and Emoji-Driven M&E Game-Changing Innovation?

Ten years ago, very few people mentioned cell phones and M&E in the same sentence. Phones were for phone calls, or for texting friends; monitoring surveys were done on paper. End of story. Whenever we at Souktel pitched the concept of cell phone-based M&E, the response–to put it mildly–was lukewarm. Collecting data through a handset was dismissed as unwieldy, unsafe, or just weird.


Lessons from some of my evaluation failures: Part 1 of ?

We’ve yet to receive much in the way of submissions to our learning from failure series, so I thought I’d share some of my trials and tribulations, and what I’ve learnt along the way. Some of this comes back to how much you need to sweat the small stuff versus delegate and preserve your time for bigger picture thinking (which I discussed in this post on whether IE is O-ring or knowledge hierarchy production). But this presumes you have a choice on what you do yourself, when often in dealing with governments and multiple layers of bureaucracy, the problem is your potential for micro-management can be less in the first place. Here are a few, and I can share more in other posts.


Giving voice to the poor: Adding a human touch to poverty data in South Sudan

We humanize what is going on in the world and in ourselves only by speaking of it, and in the course of speaking of it we learn to be human. –Hannah Arendt We all know that measuring poverty is critical to monitor progress and to tailor effective policy response. But what the numbers mask is the pain and suffering that people go through to make ends meet. Let’s take the case of South Sudan. The country has had a very tumultuous time, witnessing more than its share of a few crises between 2015 and 2016.


How to Mine All Your Existing M&E Data Without Breaking the Bank

A common challenge faced by organizations in a world where information systems are changing rapidly is a large amount of data that is not easily accessible. The Global Environment Facility (GEF), is no different, but we’ve taken important strides to address the challenge. We have years of excel files, PDFs, and CDs (!) of data squirreled away here and there – invaluable historical data which are often very difficult to access and consistently used for planning and decision-making. Established on the eve of the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, the GEF has invested over USD 15 billion over the past 25 years in protecting the global environment.


The Politics of Measuring Inequality: What gets left out and why?

Two posts on the measurement of inequality this week, so you’ll need to activate the brain cells. First up Oxfam researcher Franziska Mager summarizes a paper co-authored with Deborah Hardoon for a panel at the recent Development Studies Association conference on the power and politics behind the statistics. A version of this post appeared on Oxfam’s shiny new real geek blog. Inequality is a touchy …


Morals, morale and motivations in data fabrication: Medical research fieldworkers views and…

Publication date: October 2016 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 166 Author(s): Patricia Kingori, René Gerrets Data fabrication, incorrect collection strategies and poor data management, are considered detrimental to high-quality scientific research.


Fauci: A “global health reserve fund” needed, for Zika, and outbreaks to come

Categories: U.S. Policy and FundingTags: Dr. Anthony Fauci, NIH, zikaThe National Institutes of Health is set to start the first phase of clinical trials early this month to test the potential of a vaccine candidate against Zika virus, but without dedicated funding, proceeding to further testing will be challenged, National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases director Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday. Fauci spoke at the Bipartisan […](Read more…)


How to Create an Effective Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

In recent years, organizations and employees are being measured not on their stories, but on their numbers. When you introduce your organization, people will always ask you about your numbers – What’s your reach? What’s your impact? Meanwhile, funders and senior management are running after the concepts of big data – year-over-year increase in reach, impact measurements, geographic comparisons, and more. The MERL Tech conference is returning on October 3-4, 2016


Please RSVP Now for MERL Tech 2016 and Submit Your Session Ideas

The use of technology for monitoring, evaluation research and learning (MERL) has become increasingly sophisticated and more openly accepted in the international development and humanitarian space. We find ourselves continually pushing forward and asking: What’s next? How can we advance our work? What is the role for new technologies in improving our practice?


Obesity and Multiple Sclerosis: A Mendelian Randomization Study

by Lauren E. Mokry, Stephanie Ross, Nicholas J. Timpson, Stephen Sawcer, George Davey Smith, J. Brent Richards Background Observational studies have reported an association between obesity, as measured by elevated body mass index (BMI), in early adulthood and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, bias potentially introduced by confounding and reverse causation may have influenced these findings.


Identification Of Four Unique Spending Patterns Among Older Adults In The Last Year Of Life…

The assumption that health care spending skyrockets at the end of life might suggest that policy makers should target the last few months of life to control costs.


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