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Polio movement celebrates successes, faces setbacks

Dr. Zulfiqar Bhutta shares his reflections on polio’s complex 2013. Dr. Bhutta is Founding Director of the Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health at Aga Khan University in Pakistan, and Co-Director of Research in Global Child Health at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. The post Polio movement celebrates successes, faces setbacks appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.

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Three global health issues to watch in 2014

Devex President & CEO Raj Kumar on the connection between climate change and global health; a final push on the health MDGs, with particular focus on toilets and saving lives at birth; and health systems in fragile states taking center stage. The post Three global health issues to watch in 2014 appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.

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Fistula care in Niger – blog post on anthro dissertation

Sai Hankuri » dissertating, diversions, and data. Fascinating early data from Ali Heller (doctoral candidate in anthropology @ Washington University in St Louis) on the…

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Global leaders show unprecedented support for maternal and child health

In September 2013, World Bank, UNICEF, USAID, Norway committed an unprecedented $1.15 billion over the next three years to advance progress toward Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, and to get essential services and medicines to women and children who need them most. This commitment could position countries to be able to help save 3 million lives.  Ray Chambers, UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for Financing the Health Millennium Development Goals and For Malaria, shares his thoughts on this extraordinary event. ; The post Global leaders show unprecedented support for maternal and child health appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Why global health should embrace the global precariat

It’s not often you come across a truly visionary op-ed but in my opinion last week’s viewpoint from Guy Standing in The Guardian, ‘Cheer up – a renewed left is coming’, fits the bill. In the piece, Standing says the precariat is today’s (emerging) mass class, and like the proletariat in the 19th and part of the 20th century, it will define a new progressive agenda for this age. Not all the examples he gives of “precariat uprisings” in countries around the globe are convincing, and not everybody shares his analysis, obviously, but the man has a point. If the 21st century is to have a progressive agenda, it will need to come through a social and political mass movement with a vital role for this precariat.


Spotlight: Organizations Making a Difference in African Healthcare

In this post, GHA Blogger Udo Obiechefu sheds light on the work the Nigerian Healthcare Foundation accomplishes during its medical missions. Enjoy! Although much of the emphasis on improving health care in Africa is placed on governments and large scale international aid organizations, it is important to note the important work that is done by […]


Polio movement celebrates successes, faces setbacks

World map

Dr. Zulfiqar Bhutta shares his reflections on polio’s complex 2013. Dr. Bhutta is Founding Director of the Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health at Aga Khan University in Pakistan, and Co-Director of Research in Global Child Health at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. The post Polio movement celebrates successes, faces setbacks appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


IHP news 267: Happy Easter!

Dear Colleagues, It’s Friday, so my coffee consumption is going through the roof. The Christians among you probably have other things to do this weekend, so we’ll keep this intro short. The atheists, agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and new agers among you will surely not mind. As for the “Socialist” who has his very own religion, global health, maybe this weekend is a good time to chant his planetary manifesto together with his beloved ones.   In this week’s guest editorial, Agnes Nanyonjo ( from the Malaria Consortium Uganda, and also an EV 2012) provides some of her impressions of the 2014 Geneva Health Forum, focusing mostly on day 1 of the three-day conference


From health systems to systems for health

Agnes Nanyonjo (Malaria Consortium Uganda &  EV 2012)     The 2014 Geneva Health Forum attracted a multitude of participants from different sectors to the world health capital. They gathered for three days of debate on integration and interconnectedness of health care, as this year’s theme was ‘Global Health: Interconnected Challenges, Integrated Solutions’. The sessions by and large were designed to encourage interaction among participants and had session formats ranging from freewheeling fish bowls, a world café, … to more traditional ones like Q&A, debate etc. Integration can mean different things to different people working in different sectors, as has been previously highlighted by Rifat Atun, one of the plenary session speakers at the Forum. He stated in a 2010 Health Policy and Planning paper for example that “systematic analysis of the relative merits of integration in various contexts and for different interventions is complicated as there is no commonly accepted definition of ‘integration’—a term loosely used to describe a variety of organizational arrangements for a range of programmes in different settings.“ As panel discussants burst out into debate, this became all too clear: from integrated disease care over integrated provision of health service packages to multisectoral approaches to health, different views of integration abounded according to people’s perspectives and experience.


Three global health issues to watch in 2014

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Devex President & CEO Raj Kumar on the connection between climate change and global health; a final push on the health MDGs, with particular focus on toilets and saving lives at birth; and health systems in fragile states taking center stage. The post Three global health issues to watch in 2014 appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Eighty million years of healthy life and counting

By Kim Longfield, Director of Research, PSI The Global Health & Innovation Conference is the world’s leading global health and social entrepreneurship conference. Held in New Haven, Conn., last week, the tenth edition of the gathering attracted more than 2,000 delegates and speakers from an array of disciplines: global health leaders like Jeffrey Sachs; investigative journalists like Michael Moss; influential bloggers like Seth Godin; and activists, entrepreneurs, academics, students, donors, and implementers. It was the first time I’ve presented at this prestigious conference. The post Eighty million years of healthy life and counting appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Using GPS Data to DELIVER Health Products to People Faster

Andrew Inglis, GIS Team Lead at John Snow, Inc. for the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, describes how his team used GPS technology to map road networks in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. The USAID | DELIVER PROJECT is funded by USAID. Imagine driving a delivery truck without a map or any idea how long it will take to […]


The benefits of public-private partnerships in global health

It is imperative that both the public and private sectors work together. Businesses have invested in GAVI because they know that one of the strongest ways to promote global health is through immunization. And quite simply, vaccines provide a strong return on investment. Through collaboration between the public and private sectors, GAVI has been able to raise additional funds and, most importantly, bring significant private-sector expertise, skills, advocacy and visibility to its work The post The benefits of public-private partnerships in global health appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.