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Deaths of humanitarian aid workers reach record high

Sam Jones | Guardian Development | “Figures released for World Humanitarian Day show 2013 was most dangerous yet, with 155 deaths and 134 kidnappings” Deaths Read More

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How Smartphones are changing dermatology in Tanzania

Situated in the Mara region of Tanzania, in the northwest between Lake Victoria and the Kenyan Border, the rural village of Shirati is home to Read More

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BRICS announce plans to launch new development bank

July 10, 2014 Leaders of the BRICS nations will launch their long-awaited development bank at a summit next week and decide whether the headquarters should be in Shanghai or New Delhi, Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said on Wednesday. From Reuters: The creation by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa of a $100 billion […]The post The Daily Impact: BRICS announce plans to launch new development bank appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.

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Deaths of humanitarian aid workers reach record high

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Sam Jones | Guardian Development | “Figures released for World Humanitarian Day show 2013 was most dangerous yet, with 155 deaths and 134 kidnappings” Deaths Read More


Do we really need a new drug or vaccine for Ebola?

I get particularly excited when I see Global Health issues being debated in mainstream magazines and newspapers, and since the outbreak of Ebola has captured global attention, there has been no shortage of such discussions. Perhaps that is why I am blogging again. Why, the mainstream media asks, can we not curb the spread of this deadly epidemic that is ravaging a few countries in West Africa? Sadly, however, I think there has been too much of reacting to Ebola as though Ebola was just any other global health problem: Ebola is about Poverty, Ebola is about Globalization, or Ebola is about Culture.


The High Fives Project: Designing Healthy Homes in Bangladesh

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By ARCHIVE Global  | Jaclyn Hersh | jh@archiveglobal.org |  New York, NY – ARCHIVE Global, the New York based nonprofit working around the world to combat Read More


We Don’t Need Another Hero

Happy World Humanitarian Day. * Several weeks ago I set out to write a rant post about some uninformed person who collects “pre-loved” bras, sends them to other countries, and then tries to link it all to reduced human trafficking. The post didn’t really come together. It’s all been said before.


We are the first generation in history …

We are the first generation in history with ability to eradicate extreme poverty from the planet. The great kings, caliphs and emperors of the past would not have known how to go about it or how to pay for it. Now we basically know what it takes and we have all the required resources. What we need is the political will to just go ahead and do it! Erik Solheim, Chair of the Development Assistance Committee of the OECD, 14 August 2014 It is now recognized that, for the first time, the world has the technology and resources to eradicate extreme poverty in our lifetime.


Experimental Treatments for Ebola: Ethical? Yes. Effective? Who knows. Can we have it both…

This is a cross-post with the Innovations for Poverty Action blog. I want to thank Jeff Mosenkis for asking me to write this post. Yesterday an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization released a statement about the ethics of making experimental treatments for Ebola available to patients during the current West African outbreak. The panel unanimously concluded that it was, in fact, ethical for such treatments, which so far have never been shown to be effective, to be made available to patients given the existing circumstances and when particular conditions, for example informed consent and freedom of choice, are met. In essence: it would be unethical to withhold these treatments to wait for the rigorous randomized controlled trials that are typically done to establish effectiveness


Globalization of leptospirosis through travel and migration

Leptospirosis remains the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world, commonly found in tropical or temperate climates.


New Journal Alert: Health Systems and Reform

I’ll take of advantage of my sudden interest in blogging again, to share with you some exciting news (lets see how long this lasts). In September a new journal will be launched called “Health Systems and Reform”. The goal of the journal is to provide a new forum for academic reviews and analysis of health system issues. I have thought that there was a need for such a journal for a long time and so I am so happy to see it happen. According to the publisher: HS&R will provide cutting-edge academic analysis and critical review of national and sub-national public health, health policy, and management issues; comparative health system analyses; and health policy transfer and translation to a system’s local determinants.


At last, we finally care about Ebola…

I once read a quote in a book that stuck with me, I think it was in Hooper’s The River, that read something along the lines of: HIV did not become a global epidemic until the first white person died of this disease. I could not track down my copy of the book to confirm the source of the quote – perhaps that tome was ditched on one of my umpteen moves over the years due to size and weight – but you get the idea. Last week, the Onion’s coverage of the Ebola hysteria perfectly summed it up: “Experts: Ebola Vaccine At Least 50 White People Away“. I laughed hysterically. What everyone knows is that Ebola is now in vivo on US soil, perhaps for the first time in human history


How Smartphones are changing dermatology in Tanzania

Flickr - whiteafrican

Situated in the Mara region of Tanzania, in the northwest between Lake Victoria and the Kenyan Border, the rural village of Shirati is home to Read More


Is any harm being done?

I’ve learned the hard way over the years that anyone who dares to speak up against amateur do-gooder, voluntourism in any significant way can expect a flood of response, usually emotional, often angry, sometimes even downright vitriolic and personal. It’s not too surprising, really. No one wants to be told that they shouldn’t have collected […]


Part 2: Prevention and Control of Rheumatic Heart Disease in Kenya: Progress is on the horizon

This week on PLOS TGH – we hand over to Dr Duncan Matheka and his group, for their second post on Rheumatic Heart Disease in Kenya. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has been long neglected in the developing countries – yet a ‘preventable’ disease that is easy to manage only if detected early. We hereby highlight a number of multi-sectoral initiatives mainly targeted at the Kenyan communities towards combating RHD. 1. RHD Family Support Clubs RHD Family Support Clubs are a useful way of promoting holistic RHD care in Kenya.


How Not to Teach Children about Poverty

Photo by James Mollison Meet Shameela, 5, a stateless child from a Thai refugee camp. Shameela’s battered shack has holes in the roof and walls. She has to share an outdoor bathroom with 100 other people. Shameela is crying while a photographer takes her portrait.


Once more, from the top…

So, The Guardian (@GuardianGDP) put up a crowd-sourced article of pro-tips for volunteers to get noticed in the aid industry. I got into a Twitter conversation about the usefulness (or not) of volunteers in general. I’ve written and argued about this more then, perhaps, any other topic in the past two decades. I keep forgetting […]


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