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Why the World Can’t Wait for Universal Preschool

As a pediatric resident I spend a lot of time with preschool-aged children in the hospital or at clinic. I have the privilege of watching Read More

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Understanding reproductive health choices in LMICs

Dr Lalage Katunga holds a PhD in Pharmacology and Toxicology and a Masters in Public Health. Her research is focused on understanding factors that influence health-outcomes in understudied populations. She has experience working in the sub-Saharan Africa and is currently a Research Fellow at Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO. This week she stresses the importance of championing the full -picture of women’s empowerment and agency in LMICs, not just reproductive rights. One of the central challenges of global health is reproductive health.

“A reflexive, relentless interrogation of common sense”: Emily Yates-Doerr on anthropology, global health, and obesity

Emily Yates-Doerr is a Veni Laureate and assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. She currently is studying a United Nations initiative to improve Read More

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WHA69: Leave no one behind, World Hepatitis Alliance

Raquel Peck is the CEO of the World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA), she shares her hope that stronger action on viral hepatitis will be high on the agenda for the 69th World Health Assembly in Geneva (convening this week). Raquel’s piece is part of a series of articles Translational Global Health will run on WHA69. If you or your organisation have a particular focus at the Assembly you feel requires urgent attention, contact our Editor. We are at a turning point. This week, 194 countries will convene to decide the fate of millions of people living with viral hepatitis. At the 69th World Health Assembly in Geneva (23 – 28 May), governments will deliberate on the adoption of WHO’s first ever Global Health Sector Strategy for Viral Hepatitis (GHSS), which sets a goal of eliminating hepatitis B and C by 2030, two significant public health issues that can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and death.


Tomorrow

And now, the question on everyone’s mind is, “What difference did the World Humanitarian Summit make?” If social media is any indication, I think many could carry on a great length about everything they think was wrong about it. It is important to keep in mind that arguing, semantic debate, nit-picking, and being endlessly dissatisfied […]


Global health partnerships: building multi-national collaborations to achieve lasting…

In response to health care challenges worldwide, extensive funding has been channeled to the world’s most vulnerable health systems.


Discourse, ideas and power in global health policy networks: political attention for maternal…

Maternal and child health issues have gained global political attention and resources in the past 10 years, due in part to their prominence on the Millennium Development Goal agenda and the use of evidence-bas…


Rwanda: Using Innovation through Drones to Save Lives

Rwanda: Using Innovation through Drones to Save Lives

Video produced by Zipline. 2016.

Africa: Govt Closer to Using Drones in Medical Supplies Delivery

Published on May 15, 2016 at 7:32 pm in All Africa by Julius Bizimungu Article retrieved from:http://allafrica.com/stories/201605160346.html

Zipline Inc, a California-based robotics firm Friday announced details of a partnership with Government to make on-demand deliveries of life-saving medical products using drones.
This follows a deal signed in February, between the government and the firm to build infrastructure for unmanned aerial system (UAS) to ensure efficient logistical transportation of medical supplies in the country.
Speaking during a press briefing, the Minister for Youth and ICT, Jean-Philbert Nsengimana, said that Rwanda is ready to receive the first delivery of drones.
“We have had a fruitful and a fun-filled week talking about the forth industrial revolution at the World Economic Forum (WEF). I think it’s very significant for people to know that what they might think will be achieved in future, is already here in Rwanda. We already have the technology that people think we will have in the future. Rwanda is ready to receive the network of drones, and I truly believe this is going to shape the future,” Nsengimana noted.
Challenges
Often, essential health products don’t reach the people who urgently need them.According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), millions of mothers and children die every year due to conditions that could be prevented or treated with access to simple, and affordable medical interventions.
However, in the developing world, access to these interventions is hampered by what is known as the last-mile problem: the inability to deliver needed medicine from a city to rural or remote locations due to lack of adequate transportation, communication and supply chain infrastructure.The distribution of blood products is particularly challenging given the strict temperature requirements and short shelf life. Africa has the highest rate of maternal deaths in the world, mainly due to post partum hemorrhaging, which makes access to lifesaving blood transfusions critically important for women across the continent.
In Rwanda, rural hospitals have struggled with supplies in the past due to their isolated locations. Most life-saving supplies are currently delivered via motorcycles. According to Dr Agnes Binagwaho, the Minister for Health, the initiative is truly a life-saving technology. “We have established that if we manage to use this technology, it will be a life-saving initiative. There are a lot of advantages, but I’m also hopeful that as pioneers we learn by doing. Although, I can’t predict how many lives will be saved, even saving one life is crucial,” she said.
What Zipline is bringing
According to Keller Rinaudo, Zipline Chief Executive Officer, the company is working with the government of Rwanda to create a network of delivery drones that will ferry medical supplierding to the World Health Organisation (WHO), millions of mothers and children die every year due to conditions that could be prevented or treated with access to simple, and affordable medical interventions.
However, in the developing world, access to these interventions is hampered by what is known as the last-mile problem: the inability to deliver needed medicine from a city to rural or remote locations due to lack of adequate transportation, communication and supply chain infrastructure.The distribution of blood products is particularly challenging given the strict temperature requirements and short shelf life. Africa has the highest rate of maternal deaths in the world, mainly due to post partum hemorrhaging, which makes access to lifesaving blood transfusions critically important for women across the continent.
The network will have capacity to make 50 to 150 deliveries per day, using a fleet of 15 drones, each with twin electric motors and an almost eight-foot wingspan. The unmanned drones will use GPS to navigate, and will airdrop supplies before returning to the landing strip from which they were launched.
“The inability to deliver life-saving medicines to the people who need them the most causes millions of preventable deaths each year. Zipline will help solve that problem once and for all. We’ve built an instant delivery system for the world, allowing medicines and other products to be delivered on-demand and at a low-cost, anywhere,” said Rinaudo.
Starting July, the government will begin a public-private partnership with Zipline for the last-mile delivery of all blood products throughout the country. A team of Rwandan and American engineers will set up and operate Zipline’s first Hub in Muhanga District. From this Hub, Zipline will deliver life-saving blood to 21 facilities located in the Northern, Western, and Southern Provinces.Zipline plans to expand services to Eastern Province in early 2017, putting almost every one of Rwanda’s 11 million citizens within range of lifesaving medical product deliveries.
The partnership will strengthen ongoing efforts by the Ministry of Health to deliver a high standard of health care.


Why the World Can’t Wait for Universal Preschool

5889045157_37bba15616_o

As a pediatric resident I spend a lot of time with preschool-aged children in the hospital or at clinic. I have the privilege of watching Read More


From local to global: a qualitative review of the multi-leveled impact of a multi-country…

There is a substantial body of literature on the principles of good partnerships and the rationale for such partnerships in research capacity strengthening.


Is an unprecedented infant feeding transition underway?

This week, Dr Phil Baker of the Australian National University, writes on revealing new research analysing global trends and patterns in commercial milk-based formula sales. The blog summarises the key findings and implications of the research published in Public Health Nutrition. In particular, Dr Baker and his team ask “is an unprecedented infant and young child feeding transition underway?” To ensure children get the best start in life the World Health Organization recommends that infants are exclusively breastfed to six months of age with ongoing breastfeeding for up to two years of age and beyond. Yet worldwide the prevalence of infants exclusively breast fed to six months hovers at around 37% and has improved only marginally in recent decades. In contrast, our research shows that global milk-based formula sales are booming


The use of technology enhanced learning in health research capacity development: lessons from a…

With the recognition of the need for research capacity strengthening for advancing health and development, this research capacity article explores the use of technology enhanced learning in the delivery of a c…


Developing a framework for successful research partnerships in global health

The Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin has as one of its goals, strengthening health systems in developing countries.


The Capabilities Approach: Fostering contexts for enhancing mental health and wellbeing across…

Concerted efforts have been made in recent years to achieve equity and equality in mental health for all people across the globe.


Coalicion de Salud Comunitaria (COSACO): using a Healthy Community Partnership framework to…

There is growing concern that short-term experiences in global health experiences (STEGH), undertaken by healthcare providers, trainees, and volunteers from high income countries in lower and middle income cou…


Rwanda Army Joins Battle Against Malaria

Rwanda Army Joins Battle Against Malaria

Published on April 22, 2016 at 7:32 pm in KT Press by Patrick BigaboArticle retrieved from:http://ktpress.rw/2016/04/rwanda-army-joins-battle-against-malaria/

Health Workers prepare
to conduct indoor
residue spray in Gatsibo
district at the catchment
area of Ngarama
Hospital

Rwanda’s Army has joined the fight against malaria that is increasingly claiming more people both in the country and in Africa.
The Military is currently engaging different players in the health sector to harmonise efforts against the killer disease. The Army is coming in to utilize its resources which includes, doctors, logistical muscle and the human resource distributed across the country.

The Ministry of Health is championing the campaign. A symposium was organised together with the military to define strategies and interventions that can be implemented at different levels of the health system.

The head of internal medicine at Rwanda Military Hospital, Lt. Col. Dr. Jules Kabahizi said at the symposium that the army is keen on contributing significantly to reduce malaria cases with a long term objective of eliminating the disease.

Health Minister Dr. Agnes Binagwaho said during a one-day Malaria symposium at Serena Hotel that, “am glad our army has joined the battle field. ”

“Malaria is a threat, malaria is a problem, and it’s not only for Rwanda alone but for the whole region and it is affecting even the economies,” she said.

According to Binagwaho, Rwanda had pushed malaria to the edge and “we had started the elimination phase but it’s increased ten times more.”

Statistics from the ministry of health indicate the country has managed to reduce incidence of malaria by 86%, Mobility by malaria by 87% while mortality was reduced by 74%.

Dr. Binagwaho said that mosquitoes are now able to fly between 4 to 22 kilometers a day and survive to up to a month and are able to fly higher altitudes. This implies they can now easily fly across borders.

“Now they have leant to fly high because of global warming, it’s no longer cold up there and in less than a month they can cover the country,” she noted.

The movement of mosquitoes facilitated by several factors makes it difficult for one country to lay strategies to eliminate Malaria and thus suggests joint strategies for regional governments.

Malaria experts said drug-resistant malaria is not spreading across eastern region, but is developing independently in isolated pockets.

For Dr. Binagwaho with this new knowledge on drug-resistant malaria, there is need for regional member states to collaborate on a new strategy for combating the potentially fatal parasite.

Prof Zulu Prenji, chair-pathology in Aga Khan university Hospital told KTPress that Malaria fight needs political support. He explained that in countries where there are problems such as corruption, the fight becomes challenged.

Dr. Olushayo Olu, World Health Organisation Representative in Rwanda says despite remarkable increase in malaria cases, countries still have room to eliminate Malaria deaths through early detection and prevention.

Meanwhile, in a rare breakthrough, an international team of scientists has discovered that a mutation that makes parasites resistant to a key anti-malarial drug winds up killing them.

“The resistant parasites die before they can infect another person,” said Christopher D. Goodman of the University of Melbourne, a member of the research team.

Minister of Health
Dr. Agnes Binagwaho
and WHO country
representative
Dr Olushayo Olu
chat after the
Symposium.

Read more at KT Press: http://ktpress.rw/2016/04/rwanda-army-joins-battle-against-malaria/


The Pan-University Network for Global Health: framework for collaboration and review of global…

In the current United Nations efforts to plan for post 2015-Millennium Development Goals, global partnership to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has become a critical goal to effectively respond to the…


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