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Pediatric Critical Care in Botswana

Botswana is a small, landlocked country in Southern Africa that is widely considered a development success story. Although the country is hailed for its impressive Read More

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Sebastiana’s eyes: a reflection on providing care

After a long and warm clinic day seeing kids in one of the Mayan communities we work, I asked Yoli, our auxiliary nurse in charge Read More

Basic Life Support course in the Nurses Training School

Against all odds: medical research and education in Venezuela

Venezuela is the entrance to South America. Located in the north of the continent, bathed by the Caribbean Sea, Venezuela is one of the first places Read More

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(No) Surprise! Olympians find it hard to resist junk food too

This week, as Rio wraps up and the world looks towards Tokyo, Ali Jones from The George Institute for Global Health, along with Dr Sandro Demaio and Dr Phillip Baker, explore the recent concerning realities of junk food in our Games. Mouths were agape this month as pictures emerged from Rio of snaking lines outside McDonald’s in the athletes’ village, and Instagram posts circulated of Olympians at tables strewn with familiar golden arched wrapping. Provided free as a marketing stunt – imposing a 20 item limit was not enough to alleviate the chaos. As one Samoan swimmer said “We’re so pathetic…It’s raining, and we’re waiting in line for McDonald’s.” Averaging 1,350 calories in a single McDonald’s meal, Olympic athletes are ironically among the few who do enough physical activity to expend the energy contained in such fast foods.


The mental health and wellbeing of first generation migrants: a systematic-narrative review of…

First generation migrants are reportedly at higher risk of mental ill-health compared to the settled population.


Pediatric Critical Care in Botswana

4551782343_97b24fe1d5_o

Botswana is a small, landlocked country in Southern Africa that is widely considered a development success story. Although the country is hailed for its impressive Read More


Body image perception of African immigrants in Europe

Nutritional disorders are now spreading worldwide both in developed and developing countries.


Cross-border collaboration for neglected tropical disease efforts—Lessons learned from…

Diseases don’t respect borders, so efforts to control and eliminate diseases must also be flexible and adaptable enough to effectively reach the populations that live in the areas around national frontiers.


Economic assessment of US physician participation in short-term medical missions

Short term medical missions (STMMs) are a form of unregulated and unsanctioned, grass roots, direct medical service aid from wealthier countries to low and middle income countries.


Influential journals in health research: a bibliometric study

There is a wide range of intellectual work written about health research, which has been shaped by the evolution of diseases.


NCDs in humanitarian crisis

Sylvia Kehlenbrink graduated from medical school at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin in Berlin and completed her residency training in Social Internal Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. She has done clinical and translational research with the Global Diabetes Institute at Einstein College of Medicine focused on underserved populations in Uganda and India. In June 2015, she started her fellowship in Endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is also a fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative with the long-term goal of joining global efforts in addressing non-communicable diseases, esp.


What Can International Development Learn From Britain’s Olympic Team?

This post first appeared on Views from the Center. There is a lot of chatter about the reasons for Britain’s relative success in the Olympic games (at time of writing, Team GB is second in the medals table, ahead of China but behind the United States). This is an astonishing turnaround in just 20 years—in the Atlanta Games, Britain won only 1 gold medal, and came 36th overall on the medal table. As Emma Norris at the Institute for Government notes, this transformation in Britain’s sporting performance has generated a raft of tortured analogies with various non-sporting challenges, such as industrial and education policies (on which Britain’s performance is rather less stellar). So I’m leaping on the bandwagon with two lessons for international development


Sebastiana’s eyes: a reflection on providing care

vista

After a long and warm clinic day seeing kids in one of the Mayan communities we work, I asked Yoli, our auxiliary nurse in charge Read More


World Breastfeeding Week: Conflicts of interest in infant and young child feeding

In the aftermath of World Breastfeeding Week, leading academics in infant nutrition from the Australian National University, Julie Smith, Libby Salmon and Phillip Baker, examine the challenges that remain in keeping breastfeeding on the global agenda. Cognitive losses from formula feeding cost the world economy $300 billion a year, according to a major study earlier this year.[1] Relatedly, a review of evidence on reproductive cancers calculates that 20,000 women a year – most in high income countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom – die of breast cancer avoidable by extending breastfeeding duration [2]. For children lack of breastfeeding also means increased risk of death, infectious disease, and chronic disease including asthma, obesity and type-2 diabetes. Infant and young child feeding matters for wealthy as well as poor countries. This year’s theme for  World Breastfeeding Week, ‘breastfeeding … the foundation of a country’s development’, [3] should remind governments in high income countries that aggressive infant formula marketing isn’t just a problem for deprived populations in faraway export markets


Against all odds: medical research and education in Venezuela

Basic Life Support course in the Nurses Training School

Venezuela is the entrance to South America. Located in the north of the continent, bathed by the Caribbean Sea, Venezuela is one of the first places Read More


Four things

A few times each year I’ll get email from people or organizations who wants me to give a nod of endorsement for what they do. It’s usually some new start up organization or person with a new take on an old theme. We can argue and wordsmith things to death. In my opinion there are […]


Plays well with others…

Everyone in their first entry-level job is ready to dispense advice on how to get into the aid industry. But at some point the entry-level jobs no longer cut it. Then what? In response to specific requests, here are my five go-tos for those mid-level, blase, cynical-yet-still-kinda-idealist, over-educated, broke professionals, who maybe indulged in a […]


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