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Ebola Impact in an Uninfected Country

As Guinea and Sierra Leone struggle to eliminate Ebola within their borders, Liberia finally reached the milestone of 42 days without any new cases. The world continues to scrutinize the warning signs from a year ago hinting at the exploding outbreak; it is highlighting all of the flaws in preparedness from leading health organizations. What isn’t being analyzed is repercussions from Ebola so far flung, they haven’t been discussed. Have you heard about what effects Ebola had in Rwanda?

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Progress for the very poor: Evidence from six countries

A multifaceted program causes lasting progress for the very poor: Evidence from six countries.

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The Lancet Commission on #GlobalSurgery Report

Global Surgery 2030: evidence and solutions for achieving health, welfare, and economic development Watch Live The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery Report.

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Teaching global health with simulations and case discussions in a medical student selective

Background: Among US medical schools, demand for Global Health (GH) programs continues to grow.


A study of mobile phone use among patients with noncommunicable diseases in La Paz, Bolivia:…

Background: While global momentum supporting mobile health (mHealth) research and development is increasing, it is imperative to assess the potential fit of mHealth programs in local settings.


Implementation of an electronic fingerprint-linked data collection system: a feasibility and…

Background: Patient identification within and between health services is an operational challenge in many resource-limited settings.


Profile of people with hypertension in Nairobi’s slums: a descriptive study

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a rising health burden among the world’s poor with hypertension as the main risk factor.


Let’s Dump Technology Transfer from the Addis Agenda

This blog post by Charles Kenny and me first appeared on the CGD website. New technologies are central to the kind of global progress outlined in the Sustainable Development Goals, and those technologies need to reach people in the developing world who can benefit from them. But “technology transfer” is a terrible way to think about the issues involved — so let’s dump “transfer” from the Addis accord and think of a more constructive framework for technology in development. In a new policy paper, we outline some ideas to help build that framework. An immense number of technologies useful to development, from mobile phones and the Internet to the pneumococcal vaccine, have been developed in the last few decades


Healthcare In Danger: what happens when it all goes wrong?

This week on PLOS Translational Global Health, emergency physician and humanitarian & global health doctor, Jenny Jamieson, writes about some of the tacit dangers of delivering healthcare in low-resource settings. As healthcare workers, some of us travel to resource-limited settings to deliver care where needs are the greatest. Due to various factors, which range from economic inequality among citizens, political instability, natural disasters, conflict or warfare, many of these places are also some of the most dangerous. As a result, healthcare workers can find themselves working side-by-side to crime; and even becoming the target of directed threats or violence. Those who are willing to put themselves on the front line in order to help others, can themselves end up being actively targeted


The importance of claiming our future

I was pleased to co-author an article with Nigel Crisp that was recently published in the Lancet. You can view the article here: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)60934-5/abstract In the piece, we summarize some of the fundamental motivations behind our efforts to contribute to a recent book titled “African health leaders: making change and claiming the future.”




Effective Altruism

Here is Beth Barnes of Exeter College on the difference that effective altruism could make


Joined up government

The membership list of Cabinet Committees and Cabinet Task Forces in the new government has been published. It is striking that the Development Secretary, Justine Greening, is not a member of many of the committees which discuss business that impact on, and are affected by, international development. Here is a list of committees that the Secretary of State for International Development is not on, and (off the top of my head) some of the issues that they might discuss from which DFID’s analysis and expertise will be missing: Economic Affairs Committee Trade Intellectual property R&D Financial stability International Taxation Global financial institutions Economic Sanctions Climate Change European Affairs Committee Common Agricultural Policy Trade Policy Fisheries Free movement of people Economic reform Common Security Policy European Investment Bank EBRD Home Affairs Committee Drugs Immigration Counter-terrorism Radicalisation Democracy and human rights National Security Council (Threats, Hazards, Resilience and Contingencies) Climate Change Health Pandemics Economic stability Counter-terrorism & extremism Money laundering Movement of people Immigration task force Migrant labour Students Human trafficking Border security Asylum Health care professionals Tackling extremism in communities task force Global inequality Gender inequality Female Genital Mutilation Democracy and human rights There are several possible explanations for the omission of the international development secretary from these committees. The Institute for Government has pointed out that women Cabinet Ministers are under-represented on the Committees, so this may just be the result of general sexism. It may also be that the Cabinet Office and Number 10 staff who draw up the committee membership still think of development policy as primarily about aid.


Aid conditionalities, international Good Manufacturing Practice standards and local production…

Background: Local pharmaceutical production has been endorsed by the WHO as a means of addressing health priorities of developing countries.


How should donors work with the private sector?

This blog post, jointly written with Theo Talbot, first appeared on the CGD website. Spot the odd one out: Tanzania’s Morogoro Shoe Factory: Underwritten by the World Bank in the 1970s to supply the entire domestic market and produce for export, it never produced more than 4 percent of its capacity before folding, leaving behind a trail of dodgy deals and unpaid debt. In early 2014, USAID announced a $10 million facility to backstop loans by the Kenya Commercial Bank to local firms so that they could buy GE medical equipment, repaying half the face value of loans that default. The Advance Market Commitment for pneumococcal vaccines: Because pharmaceutical firms cannot invest in R&D for vaccines against diseases that primarily affect poor people, donors offered vaccine makers a guaranteed price per dose if they could produce a vaccine that met effectiveness and safety criteria. No prizes for identifying Number 3 as the odd one out.


Reducing the global burden of type 2 diabetes by improving the quality of staple foods: The…

Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been reaching epidemic proportions across the globe, affecting low/middle-income and developed countries.


Ebola Impact in an Uninfected Country

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As Guinea and Sierra Leone struggle to eliminate Ebola within their borders, Liberia finally reached the milestone of 42 days without any new cases. The world continues to scrutinize the warning signs from a year ago hinting at the exploding outbreak; it is highlighting all of the flaws in preparedness from leading health organizations. What isn’t being analyzed is repercussions from Ebola so far flung, they haven’t been discussed. Have you heard about what effects Ebola had in Rwanda?


A Slow Burning Natural Disaster

This week on TGH, Assistant Professor Christopher Tedeschi, MD, MA, FAWM explores heat stroke deaths in India, as they approach record numbers–and as most of the casualties may be avoidable.   Sometime in the next several days, monsoon rains will begin to sweep across India and gradually move northward, offering drenching relief to thousands caught in this year’s relentless heat wave. Andhra Pradesh, one of the hardest hit states, has reported over 1600 deaths in the past week alone. As of Tuesday morning, more than 2300 people had died nationwide as a direct result of the extreme heat. Recent reports describe modest efforts to mitigate this disastrous outcome


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