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Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality

New article from GBD 2013 data shows Demographic and Epidemiologic Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality — NEJM.

Ketamine__aka_Vitamin_K_by_iDominate

Ketamine is an essential medicine: an update from the frontline

On Friday, the United Nations’ Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) will vote on a Chinese proposal to place ketamine, an anesthetic of extreme importance for Read More

malaria

Fighting Malaria with Community Case Management (CCM) Scale-Up in Kenya

Arianna Hutcheson has posted the following blog on our course website – Social and Behavioral Foundations of Primary Health Care Source: https://www.ifrc.org/Global/Publications/Health/Beyond_Prevention_HMM%20Malaria-EN.pdf Access to health services is particularly difficult for the poor and those in more inaccessible areas of Kenya. This lack of endemic disease treatment for communities has proven to be quite deadly. With more than 11.3 million cases recorded annually, malaria is the leading killer of children under five years of age in Kenya. CCM, supported by organizations such as WHO and UNICEF, allows Kenya to effectively fight Malaria by using evidence-based life saving treatments that increase the availability and quality of proven interventions. Using a CCM strategy has shown to decrease under-five malaria mortality by 60% overall under-five mortality by 40%. In Kenya particularly, the CCM pilot program has generated convincing results as seen in the graphic below

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Insane

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. — Albert Einstein I’ll take Bill Eastery and Laura Freschi’s word for it that buy-one/give-one (BOGO) schemes like TOMS Shoes are numerically bankrupt ways to help the poor. The metrics matter, but I’m not an economist or a bean-counter, and so once […]


Corporate social responsibility in global health: an exploratory study of multinational…

Background: As pharmaceutical firms experience increasing civil society pressure to act responsibly in a changing globalized world, many are expanding and/or reforming their corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies.


Dancing Star

The disempowered women whose stories have long been told by others need to find their own voices. Some patients impact clinicians disproportionately and become etched into our minds’ eyes, lingering for years after we see them, ghosts that stay with us long after we leave the exam room. For me, one of those patients was…


Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality

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New article from GBD 2013 data shows Demographic and Epidemiologic Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality — NEJM.


Improving regulatory capacity to manage risks associated with trade agreements

Modern trade negotiations have delivered a plethora of bilateral and regional preferential trade agreements (PTAs), which involve considerable risk to public health, thus placing demands on governments to strengthen administrative regulatory capacities in regard to the negotiation, implementation and on-going management of PTAs.


BIG SODA plagiarizing the BIG TOBACCO playbook

This week on PLOS TGH is a guest post from Jack Fisher focusing on the plight of Big Soda and the innovative work of Dunk The Junk, the Maine-based NGO aiming to combat childhood consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, using a unique mixture of hip hop music, street art and basketball. Kevin Strong, MD, community paediatrician, and the Founder of this 21st century approach to health promotion, aims to buckle this concerning trend through his heartfelt passion and innovative community activities. “The Killer CAN, like the CANCER STICK, will commit millions of unknowing children to a LIFE of chronic disease UNLESS we UNITE in an aggressive OPERATION to #DEFEATSODATRON…. Unite to be #NCDFREE.” – Dr Kevin Strong, Founder of Dunk the Junk. It’s been 10 days since the World Health Organisation released their revised global sugar recommendations for adults and children to reduce their daily intake of free sugars to less than 10% of their total energy intake, alongside a further desired reduction to below 5% (6 teaspoons) per day providing additional health benefits. This was a positive step forward, however there is still a great need for collective action to tackle the underlying, commercial forces that are at risk of crippling our healthcare systems around the world.


Honor Among Thieves: Launch!

After months of angst-ridden tension, it’s finally here: The launch of my fourth book, third humanitarian aid novel, and part two of what I’m calling “The Humanitarian Fiction Trilogy” (Missionary, Mercenary, Mystic, Misfit was part one). Honor Among Thieves is now available for purchase in both paperback and Kindle format. I have read all your books […]


Weekend Update!

Weekend Update: For those who may have missed it, I was featured over at WhyDev.org this past week in a series of posts in which I answered reader questions. WhyDev is one of the best resources out there for those interested in, or who have newly begun a career in aid or development. I’m honored to be featured […]


Ketamine is an essential medicine: an update from the frontline

Ketamine__aka_Vitamin_K_by_iDominate

On Friday, the United Nations’ Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) will vote on a Chinese proposal to place ketamine, an anesthetic of extreme importance for Read More


Crisis

On one hand, it’s heartening to see the attention being paid by the The Media to the issues around chronic stress, traumatic exposure, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among humanitarian workers. The Guardian got their article in almost a year ago, and cited a bunch of researchy-sounding studies on the subject. Then, as of […]


Interview with European Times

I had the opportunity to meet with a team from the European Times and share reflections on the progress we have made in the health sector and a number of our goals to further this progress.

A link to the full article is available here: http://www.european-times.com/sector/government/dr-agnes-binagwaho-rwandas-minister-of-health/
**Minister of Health Highlights Impressive Progress and Future Goals
Dr. Agnes Binagwaho, a paediatrician, has been Rwanda’s Minister of Health for the past four years. She discusses the efforts Rwanda is making to bring high-quality, affordable healthcare to its people and outlines current and future projects. European Times: How has the Rwandan healthcare sector evolved over the past decade? Dr. Agnes Binagwaho: Rwanda has achieved more progress in its healthcare sector than expected, in spite of limited funding. Great improvements have been made in access to services, financing, equipment and human resources. The Ministry of Health is working with high synergy across sectors to use funding as efficiently as possible. Rwanda has reduced death rates from AIDs, malaria and TB, and now offers universal access to HIV treatment. Around 90% of Rwandan children have been vaccinated with ten different vaccines. We are steadily increasing the number and quality of our healthcare professionals and we have implemented an advanced electronic information system for the healthcare network. European Times: What are your current goals for the healthcare sector? Dr. Agnes Binagwaho: The ministry’s mission is to bring good health to all Rwandans. Having made great progress in combating communicable diseases, Rwanda now needs to tackle non-communicable diseases. The ministry has launched preventive campaigns concerning protection from HIV infection, the need to wear seatbelts and helmets, and the risks of smoking. We will continue to expand the healthcare network and will upgrade existing hospitals to three more referral and four provincial hospitals. The ministry is promoting private-sector participation, public-private partnerships, education and investment in healthcare infrastructure. Public-private partnerships are already very important in the healthcare sector, since around 40% of the country’s hospitals are privately owned but benefit from government support.European Times: What are the main challenges the healthcare sector faces? Dr. Agnes Binagwaho: We need more healthcare professionals and more specialists in different medical fields, including oncology. Rwanda now has nine nursing schools which will graduate a total of around 900 nurses per year. We need to quadruple the number of Rwanda’s healthcare professionals so Rwanda welcomes private universities offering healthcare training. Expanding the healthcare infrastructure is one of the Ministry’s goals.European Times: What are the opportunities for foreign investors?Dr. Agnes Binagwaho: In addition to investment in healthcare training, the Ministry of Health wants to attract investment in private healthcare facilities and high-quality pharmaceuticals, and may outsource the management of public hospitals. Investors should keep in mind that Rwanda is well placed to become a regional healthcare hub.


Fighting Malaria with Community Case Management (CCM) Scale-Up in Kenya

malaria

Arianna Hutcheson has posted the following blog on our course website – Social and Behavioral Foundations of Primary Health Care Source: https://www.ifrc.org/Global/Publications/Health/Beyond_Prevention_HMM%20Malaria-EN.pdf Access to health services is particularly difficult for the poor and those in more inaccessible areas of Kenya. This lack of endemic disease treatment for communities has proven to be quite deadly. With more than 11.3 million cases recorded annually, malaria is the leading killer of children under five years of age in Kenya. CCM, supported by organizations such as WHO and UNICEF, allows Kenya to effectively fight Malaria by using evidence-based life saving treatments that increase the availability and quality of proven interventions. Using a CCM strategy has shown to decrease under-five malaria mortality by 60% overall under-five mortality by 40%. In Kenya particularly, the CCM pilot program has generated convincing results as seen in the graphic below


What would persuade the aid business to ‘think and work politically’?

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Some wonks from the ‘thinking and working politically’ (TWP) network discussed its influencing strategy last week. There were some people with proper jobs there, who demanded Chatham House Rules, which happily means I don’t have to remember who said what (or credit anyone). The discussion was intere…


South Africa’s quadruple burden of disease

This week, Pooja Yerramilli returns to explore NCDs and the quadruple burden as barriers to economic and social development with Sandhya Singh – Director of Disease, Disability, and Geriatrics within South Africa’s Department of Health. Three years ago, I found myself on a bus in South Africa, with fifteen of my college classmates. We were on our way to Kruger National Park, after a week of volunteering and researching in Cape Town. As I stared out the window, appreciating rural South Africa’s beauty, a large billboard, seemingly in the middle of nowhere, caught my attention.


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