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Information Systems: the Secret to Solving Uganda’s Health Problems

It’s interesting how so many ideas have been documented and visualized about improving the health sector in Uganda, while ignoring the fact that an improved health sector starts with health providers being able to work more efficiently and effectively. This involves proper documentation of patient records, proper data storage, and proper feedback mechanisms in order to create a smooth information flow. Most of the current processes are often manual and more laborious than they need to be. This causes greater inefficiencies, longer turn-around time, loss of revenue due to inaccurate compilations, inability to archive data for future use, and poor allocation of resources. Well developed health information systems that are based on the idea of sharing critical information can assist areas of operation in the health sector

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Focus on Disability: Universal healthcare can happen

But it will mean organising health systems so that they meet disabled people’s unique needs, says Hannah Kuper.

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Health worker strike called off in Sierra Leone

Health workers responding to the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone ended their strike that stated

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Information Systems: the Secret to Solving Uganda’s Health Problems

uganda flag wiki

It’s interesting how so many ideas have been documented and visualized about improving the health sector in Uganda, while ignoring the fact that an improved health sector starts with health providers being able to work more efficiently and effectively. This involves proper documentation of patient records, proper data storage, and proper feedback mechanisms in order to create a smooth information flow. Most of the current processes are often manual and more laborious than they need to be. This causes greater inefficiencies, longer turn-around time, loss of revenue due to inaccurate compilations, inability to archive data for future use, and poor allocation of resources. Well developed health information systems that are based on the idea of sharing critical information can assist areas of operation in the health sector


The Pledge

At CGD Europe we try not to organise any men-only panels (I regret to say we ended up with one such panel when our star speaker could not join us at short notice). I’ve taken the further step of making a pledge not to appear on any panels of two or more people without at least one woman. Scott Gilmore puts it well: As the audience patiently waited for us to answer the question, “Why are there no women on stage?” I thought of my friend Owen Barder, a well-known economist and a world-class mind. He once told me that he refused to join all-male panels.


Rising Wealth Inequality and NCDs – What’s the Link?

This week, Maja Pleic writes on the connections between economic inequality and non-communicable disease. A timely article, in time for the latest triennial Global Status Report on NCDs. On January 19th, Oxfam released a report which shows that global wealth inequality, already alarmingly high, is set to continue its rise and by next year, the richest 1% of the global population will hold as much wealth as the remaining 99% of the population. This trend is not only worrisome from the perspective of social equity, but represents a real danger for almost all aspects of human and social development and poses a serious threat to the health of our economies, democracies, education systems, health systems and the very health of all individuals on this planet.


Aid Industry Career Advice

There’s been a spike, lately, in the amount of email in my inbox wanting advice for landing that sweet, aid industry career. For posterity, and to save myself copy/pasting the same email over and over, here’s the summary. I assume you agree that voluntourism is bad, and that (you think) you’re looking at humanitarian aid […]


No smoking gun – DFID and the surge in spending

This blog post first appeared on Views from the Center. The UK development agency, DFID, was mauled by the famously easy-going British press this weekend after an apparently critical National Audit Office report. “[I]n Dfid’s imposing new headquarters off Trafalgar Square, the big worry was how to shovel money out of the door,” said David Blair in the Telegraph. “[C]ivil servants are spending vast sums of public money with no assurance of serving either the world’s poorest people or the interests of taxpayers,” said The Times. The Daily Mail characteristically played the man rather than the ball with a savage attack on Mark Lowcock, the exceptionally talented, hard-working, and widely respected senior official in DFID.


Focus on Disability: Universal healthcare can happen

uhc

But it will mean organising health systems so that they meet disabled people’s unique needs, says Hannah Kuper.


Health worker strike called off in Sierra Leone

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

Health workers responding to the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone ended their strike that stated


6 New Year’s Resolutions for Your Body and Your Planet.

Another year over, and a new one just begun. Happy New Year and may it be a wonderful one! As 2015 begins, but before it starts to speed away, many of us will be taking a moment to look back. A brief chance to take stock of the past and with this in mind, plan changes for the future. Many of us will be casting our resolutions. But this year, going into the countdown to some major hurdles for the human race and the planet – including the framing of the new post-2015 Millennium Development Goal replacements and the major Paris meeting on Climate Change – can our resolutions be more than just about ourselves?


Migration and Development: Small Tweaks for Big Benefits

This blog post by me and Theodore Talbot first appeared on Views from the Center. Britain’s highly charged debate about immigration means that migration systems and policies are potentially in flux—a chance, perhaps, for innovation. We believe there are opportunities to tweak these policies so that they deliver big benefits for poor people, avoid the most harmful unintended consequences, and make British people better-off. Granted, development is unlikely to be at the front of politicians’ minds as they weigh up the options for migration policy, but now is exactly the right time for a discussion about how to shape immigration policy for development impact within the bounds of the current political agenda. We put our heads together to come up with thirteen innovations for immigration policy to deliver meaningful benefits for international development.


Payment-by-results in International Development: the elixir or the poison?

This week, Jason Calvert (MPH) – a development and health economist with PwC – explores the benefits limitations of a Payment-by-Results approach to international development. As the concept of Payment-by-Results (PbR) gains momentum in the international development sector, it hasn’t taken long for it to turn into somewhat of a ‘dirty’ word – particularly among not-for-profits. In some ways, its reputation can be justified but not entirely. PbR is a payment mechanism where delivery organisations will only get all or part of their payment upon the delivery of some form of ‘result’. This differs from other payment mechanisms where payments may be made upfront or on the delivery of inputs or intermediate outputs rather than results.


International Health Care Systems: Selected Measures

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An interactive graphic presents characteristics of selected health care systems from around the world, as well as health outcomes achieved in each country covered in Read More


West Africa: O Come thou Dayspring

It is 3 days before I am to leave, and I am making rounds to ensure that correct infection and control practices are being carried out at Martha Tubman, the hospital in Zwedru where I have been working. Gameh, the nursing director, calls me in to see “Martha”, a 23 year old patient on the female ward…


Thirty years a vegetarian

I became vegetarian thirty years ago today. I was living in Ethiopia, and we had bought a sheep for the Embassy Christmas barbecue. It was tied up outside my bedroom window. We hoped it would fatten up on the lush, watered grass of the Embassy lawns. It didn’t: instead it wasted away


2014 Annual Conference “Cities and Development: Urban Determinants of Success”

DRI’s annual conference took place on November 18, 2014 in the Rosenthal Pavilion of NYU Kimmel Center.  350 guests attended to hear the presentations and discuss research that examines cities as dynamic units at which development happens. The event was co-hosted by the NYU Marron Institute of Urban Management. Program and Speakers: Download the conference program with speaker bios here. Photographs (courtesy of Dave Anderson): Videos (courtesy of Dave Anderson): Click to view conference abstract The success and failure of cities reveal powerful development forces which are hard to see on a national scale


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