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Realistic portrayal of the scientific community needed to combat science denial

With the recent release of the movie “Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe,” I’m seeing a few blog posts and articles pop up about the hegemonic Read More

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Reflections on a year of malnutrition

Malnutrition is frustrating. I often sit in the office, analyzing data from our programs, and feel helpless. Children who stay the same height for two Read More

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Why the World Can’t Wait for Universal Preschool

As a pediatric resident I spend a lot of time with preschool-aged children in the hospital or at clinic. I have the privilege of watching Read More

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Brexit: what might it mean for global health?

This week on PLOS Translational Global Health, Rhea Saksena talks all things Brexit – and what it might mean for local and global health. This week, the United Kingdom (UK) has made the unprecedented move of leaving the European Union (EU), an economic and political union of 28 member countries. After a close result, the Leave campaign won the referendum with 52% of the votes compared to 48% for the Remain campaign, with a 72.2% voter turnout. As the country now grapples to come to terms with the consequences of this election, this rejection of EU membership threatens to have a great impact on the health of people both within the UK as well as internationally. Immigration and Healthcare UK health system financing is provided through central taxation to the National Health Service (NHS)


More in common

I’m tired and upset, and that probably isn’t the best time to write about what I think of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union.  But here goes anyway. I reserve the right to think something different after I’ve slept on it. I refuse to be drawn in to bitterness, recrimination and division.


Training the next generation of global health experts: experiences and recommendations from…

Finding solutions to global health problems will require a highly-trained, inter-disciplinary workforce.


Realistic portrayal of the scientific community needed to combat science denial

800px-Community_health_worker_gives_a_vaccination_in_Odisha_state,_India_(8380317750)

With the recent release of the movie “Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe,” I’m seeing a few blog posts and articles pop up about the hegemonic Read More


Measuring success in global health diplomacy: lessons from marketing food to children in India

Global health diplomacy (GHD) focuses on international negotiation; principally between nation states, but increasingly non-state actors However, agreements made at the global level have to be enacted at the n…


Whose aid is most effective? Are generous donors less effective?

This blog post, co-authored with Petra Krylová and Theodore Talbot, first appeared on Views from the Center. When it comes to development aid, you might think that there is a trade-off between head and heart: that more generous donors would be less serious about making sure that their aid is used properly. There are some examples of this: Luxembourg has a large aid programme which appears to be relatively less effective compared to its peers; whereas Ireland, which spends a lower proportion of its national income on aid, has the most effective aid programme among the donors we were able to evaluate. But in a new CGD working paper, we find that these are indeed exceptions. In general, more generous donors tend also to be the most effective


Public Health or Politics: The Recent History of America’s Gun Epidemic and What Public…

James Michiel is an American public health technologist and writer. He holds an MPH in Epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health, is currently a Senior mHealth Analyst at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health and also serves as a Senior Technical Consultant for NCDFREE. In this brief essay, he responds to the Orlando tragedy with an examination of the impact of America’s epidemic of gun violence and how we might use Public Health and Policy to change it. On November 14, 2013, the eminently qualified Harvard physician, Dr. Vivek Murthy, was nominated by President Barack Obama to become the 19th United States Surgeon General.


Giving Back: A mixed methods study of the contributions of US-Based Nigerian physicians to home…

There is increased interest in the capacity of US immigrants to contribute to their homelands via entrepreneurship and philanthropy.


Brexit and Truthiness

We received a leaflet today from the Vote Leave campaign, purporting to be an EU Myth Buster. It contains a number of statements which are untrue, such as: “The EU costs us £350 million per week” – the correct number is £135 million a week. “The EU is expanding to include: Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey” – no it isn’t. “Brexit would bring … the ability to dump the European Convention on Human Rights” (this assertion is attributed to Sir Richard Dearlove) – the ECHR is of course not an EU body, so leaving the EU would make no difference to our obligations under it. Presumably the Vote Leave campaign knows that these statements are false. When did it become acceptable in Britain for a mainstream political campaign to say things which they know to be untrue


Do middle-income countries really get more aid than low-income countries?

This blog post, co-authored with Matt Juden, first appeared on Views from the Center In a recent TV documentary, Professor Hans Rosling suggested that middle-income countries (MICs) get three times as much aid per person in poverty as countries which are further back in their development. Political pressure to spend more aid in fragile and conflict-affected states—and to spend more of the aid budget on refugees displaced by conflict—has led to concern among policy-makers that poor but relatively stable countries may now be under-aided. So is aid being spent disproportionately in MICs? As you would expect, countries are diverse, and so too is the amount of aid they each receive. This makes it difficult to summarise the position with summary statistics such as “average.” The comparison is sensitive to the choice of average: are we thinking about the mean or the median person, and the mean or median country?


Addressing the impact of economic sanctions on Iranian drug shortages in the joint…

The U.S Congress initiated sanctions against Iran after the 1979 U.S.


The effect of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) on health service delivery in mission…

In 2004, Ghana began implementation of a National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to minimize out-of-pocket expenditure at the point of use of service.


Reflections on a year of malnutrition

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Malnutrition is frustrating. I often sit in the office, analyzing data from our programs, and feel helpless. Children who stay the same height for two Read More


The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and health: few gains, some losses, many risks

In early October 2015, 12 nations signed the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA), promoted as a model ‘21st century’ trade and investment agreement that other countries would eventually join.


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