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Does Governance Help Achieve Universal Health Coverage?

I first heard about Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in 2010. At the time, I was working with a group of economists who had just returned Read More

Crowdfunding for Global Health: a novel solution or temporary fix? 

By Elizabeth Sherwin and Katia Cnop Elizabeth Sherwin was the Watsi Fellow working with Maya Health Alliance in Guatemala for 2016-2017. Katia Cnop is a Read More

Navigating hearing disabilities in Morocco

Published with permission from Round Earth Media  By Maria Luisa Frasson-Nori RABAT, Morocco – In an inconspicuous brown building sandwiched between a tire shop and Read More

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Does Governance Help Achieve Universal Health Coverage?

I first heard about Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in 2010. At the time, I was working with a group of economists who had just returned Read More


Other Countries Can Learn From Rwanda’s Experience Improving Health Equity

Project Syndicate: A Formula for Health Equity Agnes Binagwaho, vice chancellor of the University of Global Health Equity “…[P]erhaps the most important factor behind [Rwanda’s] dramatic health care gains has been the national equity agenda, which sets targets for supporting the needy and tracks progress toward meeting them. … In working toward health equity, Rwanda…More


Time to take the conversation on adolescent health out of airconditioned conference rooms, and…

From October 27th to 29th, New Delhi, a wonderfully vibrant, colorful and youthful city, hosted over 1000 delegates and 125 youths from 65 different countries exploring issues related to adolescent health. The 11th World Congress on Adolescent Health, themed “Investing in Adolescent Health – The Future is now” was organized by the International Association for Adolescent Health in partnership with donors and consortium partners. As two public health researchers working in the field of adolescent health in Tanzania, we were more than happy to be at the conference, as you can imagine. The event featured 8 keynote lectures, 4 plenaries, 3 debates, 81 oral presentations and over 100 poster presentations.


Let’s get political…

The ninth edition of the World Health Summit (WHS) was held during October 15th -17th, in a nice former cinema hall in the city of East Berlin, built in the early 1960s and with a rather appropriate name for the occasion, “Kosmos”.  This year, the event was attended by 2,000 participants from 100 countries, all aiming “to improve healthcare all over the world”. Well, at least, that’s the idea. Although I was a bit afraid this would be a “mini Davos-like” event, as described (arguably, by a biased observer)  in past editions, it was surprising and even encouraging to see a good demographic balance, with very young students and professionals, as well as senior high-profile researchers, decision-makers and CEOs from pharmaceutical companies, among other usual suspects. Even a royal member of the Kingdom of Jordan, Princess Dina Mired, actively participated as the President-Elect of the Union for International Cancer Control


Vanessa Kerry Speaks About Seed Global Health, Working Toward Health Equity In Forbes Interview

Forbes: How Seed Global Health Is Using Education To Reduce Global Health Inequities “Some people can pinpoint the exact moment that inspired their career path. For Dr. Vanessa Kerry, the founder and CEO of Seed Global Health, it was a childhood trip to an impoverished Vietnam. Dr.


A new use for an old tool: maternity waiting homes to improve equity in rural childbirth care….

AbstractLimited quality of childbirth care in sub-Saharan Africa primarily affects the poor.


Drug counterfeiting – a 21st century solution to an age-old problem

Heard of blockchain technology? Ever wondered what it has to do with public health? When it comes to drug counterfeiting, this emerging technology may be the silver bullet for securing quality, safety and equity. Ensuring the safety and integrity of the global medicine supply chain is one of the most complex challenges facing healthcare delivery.


Mexico City Policy Could ‘Stymie Efforts’ To Control Global AIDS

New York Times: Letter to the Editor: Trump and AIDS Serra Sippel, president of the Center for Health and Gender Equity (Change) “…Though Mr. Trump’s proposal to reduce funding for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, … was rejected by both the House and the Senate appropriations committees, the administration’s version of…More


The ABCs of cervical cancer prevention in remote locations

In 2014, DB Peru launched The Amazon Community-Based Participatory Cervical Cancer Prevention Programme as a collaborative approach to screening and treatment of cervical cancer in Lower Napo River (LNR) communities in the Peruvian Amazon. In the remote LNR, shaping a programme that addressed community needs, such as health literacy and improving access to healthcare, as well as ensuring a high level of clinical gynaecological care, was a challenge. In preparation, we collated a range of diverse resources from around the world. We gathered knowledge at international conferences, spoke to professionals at the coal-face of cancer prevention in low-resource settings, sourced donations from a range of companies, and collaborated with local government services. Most importantly, we worked beside communities to understand their needs, and shape local solutions to education, screening and treatment of cervical cancer.


Crowdfunding for Global Health: a novel solution or temporary fix? 

By Elizabeth Sherwin and Katia Cnop Elizabeth Sherwin was the Watsi Fellow working with Maya Health Alliance in Guatemala for 2016-2017. Katia Cnop is a Read More


Canada’s Foreign Aid Strategy Signals Commitment To Women, Gender Equity

The Lancet: Canada’s feminist foreign aid agenda Editorial Board “…The announcement on June 9 of a CAN$5 billion annual aid plan for the next five years, directed at women’s organizations in the Global South, has now been welcomed as a feminist foreign aid strategy. Ninety-five percent of Canadian foreign aid will now be committed to…More


HHS Secretary Price Should Look To Example Of Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus’ Leadership To…

The Hill: Developing nations are taking the lead on health care access — U.S. could learn from them Krista Scott of Child Care Aware of America; Uzma Alam, global health practitioner; and Sinsi Hernández-Cancio, health care policy expert, and all participants in the Allies for Reaching Community Health Equity Public Voices Fellowship of The OpEd…More


Our Oceans, Our Future: Fisheries and Climate Change.

“Our oceans, our future” was the slogan of the UN Oceans Conference held in New York in June 2017, which focused on how to sustainably manage our ocean’s marine resources. Recently published research, however, suggests something a bit different. This global analysis shows that least developed countries and Small Island developing states are among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts on fisheries. Having contributed relatively little to the problem of climate change, they may be left wondering: ‘their oceans, our future?’   This week, in newly published research, authors construct a vulnerability index for 147 countries building on the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which assesses vulnerability as a function of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity (see Figure 1). The resulting index is based on the most recent socio-economic data, as well as future projections of climate change impacts using a variety of different scenarios and timeframes.


Mass Bed Net Distribution Campaigns Across Sub-Saharan Africa Can Improve Health Equity

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: Mass bed net distribution campaigns reduce health disparities across sub-Saharan Africa In a guest post, Courtney Chiaparas, writing for MEASURE Evaluation, discusses a study that examined the effectiveness of bed net distribution campaigns to prevent and control malaria across sub-Saharan Africa. Chiaparas writes, “The study makes a case…More


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