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Chiapas Health Workers Improve Maternal Health with mHealth

Rural Chiapas might appear to be an unlikely place for mHealth initiatives to gain traction—with one person in four unable to read, and little cell phone reception or internet connectivity in the mountains, it would seem that accessing understandable information through mobile technology would be a challenge for health workers and patients alike.Yet the community health workers of Compañeros en Salud (CES) have found unexpected ways to make innovations in mobile health technologies work for them and strengthen their programs.CES, a sister branch of Partners in Health, started training frontline health workers in 2012, who in turn began outreach initiatives to treat patients who previously had to travel long distances and pay exorbitant prices to receive care. Women in Chiapas die in childbirth 70% more often than the national average. In the two years since the project’s start, CES has managed to provide affordable care to tens of thousands of patients. This reach is in some part due to their incorporation of mHealth apps (which function offline once downloaded) to better manage their patient information, minimizing the “time-consuming and error-prone process” of using and maintaining paper health records.Within just one year, the team was able to use this technology to collect health information from over 5,000 patients.More recently, CES staff realized they could use these tablets for more than just data collection and efficient record-keeping; they could also use them as tools to educate health workers and their patients.Mobile apps could also be used to train health workers and help them to build new skills such as identifying symptoms and responding to emergencies. Frontline health workers could also use educational images and messages with patients to help explain a condition or help a patient to describe their symptoms.To explore this idea, CES performed a field-test using the Safe Pregnancy and Birth App, a mobile application developed by Hesperian Health Guides in 2011 to provide life-saving information about pre- and post-natal care. The field test was conducted by community health workers, midwives, and clinic staff, who used the app during checkups with patients

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Mobile phone app fights TB in Vietnam

What do the following facts have in common? Vietnam has 90 million people and roughly 120 million mobile subscriptions (a 130 percent saturation rate). Cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are rising in Vietnam, 23 percent of which are retreatment cases. Here’s the answer: … Continue reading » ; ; ; ;Related StoriesFriday Think: the $150 ebola technology challengeThe future of field appropriate diagnosticsNew test combats major cause of preventable blindness in Africa ;

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Text Message Campaign Helped Senegal Stop Ebola Outbreak, WHO Says

Media sources report on the WHO’s announcement that a text messaging campaign helped Senegal stop a local Ebola outbreak. CQ HealthBeat: Text Messaging Aids in Ebola Fight, WHO Says “…Senegal’s recent stamping out of Ebola was achieved not only through its rapid infectious disease control work but also by using a novel approach relying on…More

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A Journey South

Two days from now we begin a BRCK overland expedition to South Africa. Like any of our trips, it is meant to be fun and adventurous, while at the same time giving us the opportunity to stress test our product beyond the norm. In the vein of our past expeditions to Turkana and the Nile, […]


Opinion Pieces Discuss Access To Water, Sanitation On World Toilet Day

The Conversation: Imagine life without a proper toilet: that’s the reality for 1 in 3 people Juliet Willetts, associate professor and research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney “…World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things we take…More


Chiapas Health Workers Improve Maternal Health with mHealth

cellphone2

Rural Chiapas might appear to be an unlikely place for mHealth initiatives to gain traction—with one person in four unable to read, and little cell phone reception or internet connectivity in the mountains, it would seem that accessing understandable information through mobile technology would be a challenge for health workers and patients alike.Yet the community health workers of Compañeros en Salud (CES) have found unexpected ways to make innovations in mobile health technologies work for them and strengthen their programs.CES, a sister branch of Partners in Health, started training frontline health workers in 2012, who in turn began outreach initiatives to treat patients who previously had to travel long distances and pay exorbitant prices to receive care. Women in Chiapas die in childbirth 70% more often than the national average. In the two years since the project’s start, CES has managed to provide affordable care to tens of thousands of patients. This reach is in some part due to their incorporation of mHealth apps (which function offline once downloaded) to better manage their patient information, minimizing the “time-consuming and error-prone process” of using and maintaining paper health records.Within just one year, the team was able to use this technology to collect health information from over 5,000 patients.More recently, CES staff realized they could use these tablets for more than just data collection and efficient record-keeping; they could also use them as tools to educate health workers and their patients.Mobile apps could also be used to train health workers and help them to build new skills such as identifying symptoms and responding to emergencies. Frontline health workers could also use educational images and messages with patients to help explain a condition or help a patient to describe their symptoms.To explore this idea, CES performed a field-test using the Safe Pregnancy and Birth App, a mobile application developed by Hesperian Health Guides in 2011 to provide life-saving information about pre- and post-natal care. The field test was conducted by community health workers, midwives, and clinic staff, who used the app during checkups with patients


How we made FrontlineSync

If You Build It, They Will Come This year we deployed our Android SMS gateway app — FrontlineSync — to public beta. We decided to build FrontlineSync to make it easier for our users to connect the power of FrontlineSMS to the GSM network. Connecting to the mobile network can be a barrier to users, so we wanted to build a resilient and easy to use platform that would work everywhere.


Scheduled Maintenance November 20th

Our servers will be undergoing maintenance and updates this week on Thursday. There may be intermittent periods during which the Magpi.com website is not accessible, during this time range: 11:00PM EST on Wednesday, November 19th (4:00AM GMT on Thursday, November 20th) to 9:00AM EST on Thursday, November 20th During this period it will, of course, […] The post Scheduled Maintenance November 20th appeared first on Magpi.


Test news

Test newsw The post Test news appeared first on Magpi.


Mobile phone app fights TB in Vietnam

vietnam map wiki

What do the following facts have in common? Vietnam has 90 million people and roughly 120 million mobile subscriptions (a 130 percent saturation rate). Cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are rising in Vietnam, 23 percent of which are retreatment cases. Here’s the answer: … Continue reading » ; ; ; ;Related StoriesFriday Think: the $150 ebola technology challengeThe future of field appropriate diagnosticsNew test combats major cause of preventable blindness in Africa ;


Additional Federal Funding For HIV Vaccine Research Needed, Experts Say At CSIS Event

Media sources report on an event held Tuesday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, titled “Ending Epidemics Through Technology: Developing an HIV Vaccine.” CQ HealthBeat: Advocates Cite Promising AIDS Vaccine Research in Quest for Funds “AIDS experts said Tuesday that it’s critical to push for higher levels of federal funding to develop an…More


Text Message Campaign Helped Senegal Stop Ebola Outbreak, WHO Says

Flickr - whiteafrican

Media sources report on the WHO’s announcement that a text messaging campaign helped Senegal stop a local Ebola outbreak. CQ HealthBeat: Text Messaging Aids in Ebola Fight, WHO Says “…Senegal’s recent stamping out of Ebola was achieved not only through its rapid infectious disease control work but also by using a novel approach relying on…More


Shaping the Market for Global Health Data

This is a joint post with Prashant Yadav, University of Michigan The most valuable currency in global health programs today is accurate and reliable data, but such data—abundant in rich countries—does not exist for most low-income and lower-middle-income countries. And without data on past consumption and unmet needs, program planners and global financiers cannot budget appropriately, pharmaceutical and vaccine companies cannot plan investments, and it is harder to understand how programs are performing and how patients’ needs are changing over time. In OECD countries like the United States, Japan, and those of the European Union, organizations such as IMS Health collect data from a wide array of data sources throughout the health-care delivery chain


Like writing? Social innovation? Technology? Read on.

If you’re interested in technology – in particular the human face of technology in international development – have excellent writing and research skills, and want to develop our presence on the National Geographic website, then we might have the perfect opportunity for you. For a number of years, kiwanja.net has worked hard to take the ‘mobile message’ to the masses, sharing human stories of how technology is improving lives around the world and sharing them in an accessible format with the general public. “Digital Diversity“ with National Geographic is our flagship effort, and to date we have posted dozens of stories on how different technologies, from mobile phones to solar power, are improving the lives of people everywhere. The series is very popular and has strong support from the National Geographic staff who regularly tweet and share the stories with their millions of followers. The series has recently been managed by a number of volunteers, a couple of which have since gone on to take up full time roles with international development organisations


Sue Desmond-Hellmann, Sam Altman Discuss Technology In Global Health, Development

Wall Street Journal: What Technology Can Do for Health “Sue Desmond-Hellmann runs the $40 billion Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is probably best known for investing in the development of drugs and vaccines to fight widespread diseases such as AIDS and malaria. Sam Altman is the president of Y Combinator, one of the best-known…More


River blindness and the communities it affects

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Editor’s note: This week PATH is announcing the launch of a new diagnostic test for river blindness with manufacturing partner Standard Diagnostics, Inc. Over three days, our blog series will explore how river blindness affects communities, how the diagnostic test … Continue reading » ; ; ; ;Related StoriesYour innovation story for the weekendAdvocating better health for Zambia’s newbornsWe agree: principles are paramount for new digital development ;


Frontline at Nine

For a technology product, a 9th birthday is no small feat. It’s an even bigger feat for a technology non-profit.


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