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Our favorite Hub Originals from 2016

In case you missed it, here’s a roundup of our favorite Hub Originals from 2016. The Global Health Hub publishes original pieces from writers engaged in global Read More

Reproductive Health in Madagascar

I vividly remember the beginning of my trip to Madagascar to perform reproductive health research. At the end of providing an update to my mentor Read More

The Art of Letting Go and the Mandate of Going Further

This piece was previously published in the National Medical Journal of India, Volume 29, Number 1, 2016, pages 30-31, and reprinted with permission.   In Read More

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Kenya creates online system to monitor rural sanitation

Kenya’s vision of ending open defecation has received a boost from an online tool that tracks rural sanitation.


If we want to innovate, we need to disrupt our relationships and embrace tension

Guest post from Caroline Cassidy, Communications Manager in ODI’s Research and Policy in Development team Henry Ford famously said ‘if you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.’ The same can be said for our relationships. When it comes to getting evidence into policy no one can dispute that to have any success you need strong working relationships, champions, …


Avoiding Data Graveyards: How can we overcome barriers to data use?

Development practitioners track mortality rates for scourges like HIV/AIDS, and malaria. But nobody tracks the mortality rate of data. Photo by Christian Maurer/Fotolia.The data revolution has a blindspot — data graveyards. (That’s where unused data goes to die.) Investors and producers of development data, including AidData,


The Future of mHealth

Earlier this month the Finnish mobile phone maker, Nokia, announced that they will be re-releasing an updated version of their legendary 3310 GSM phone. Since it was first released in the early 2000s, the Nokia 3310 has gained a cult following for its incredible durability, long battery life and compact design featuring an internal antenna. Many Europeans and Americans fondly remember the 3310 as their first mobile phone, a device that made meeting up with friends in a crowd easier and a device that provided endless hours of entertainment with the timeless game Snake. In the developing world, however, the Nokia 3310 was a lifeline. Owning a reliable, durable communications device that could go days without charging meant that millions of people could connect with relatives and friends in ways they never could before


Update on ICT4Peace Activities: March 2017

Access our latest newsletter anchored to the Foundation’s activities around cybersecurity, training, collaborations and strategic input to processes dealing with technology and peacebuilding here. Download the newsletter as a PDF here.


5 Wearable & Sensor Devices that Save Lives

Visit link: 5 Wearable & Sensor Devices that Save Lives


How can governments raise money from automation and ICT to compensate the losers?

Got a feeling I’m going to end up looking pretty stupid with this post, but hey, what’s the point of a blog if you can’t humiliate yourself in public? Went to a ‘digital development summit’ earlier this week (here’s a prior curtain raiser on this blog). The theme was the ‘future of work’ (see earlier musings on this blog). Proper post to follow when I …


If You Are Still Collecting Data on Paper, You Are Wasting Everyone’s Time

Way back in 2001, Satellife pioneered the use of PDA’s for health-related data collection in Uganda and Kenya. In the 15 years since, Satellife became the TechLab at FHI 360 and mobile data collection has become routine and easy with Open Data Kit, countless derivatives, and a whole plethora of companies dedicated to delivering seamless mobile data collection as a service. Yet, there are still people advocating for paper-based surveys and projects that actually send out enumerators with questionnaires and clipboards. Why? Here are five reasons why you are wasting everyone’s time if you are still collecting data on paper.


Innovations to Accelerate Universal Internet Adoption

Mobile and internet services have the power to transform lives, offering life-enhancing financial, health, and many other services, as well as the simple ability to express oneself to one’s family and community. Yet millions of people in emerging markets lack access to these services, and even those who have access often do not adopt services, because of constraints arising from limited affordability, perceived value, and ability to use the services. The resulting access and adoption gaps threaten to exacerbate existing economic and social inequities facing low-income, rural communities in emerging markets, particularly among women and girls. The Market Alone Will Not Deliver The market alone will not close the access gap. Over time, industry investment in mobile and fixed networks in the developing world may increase and extend existing network coverage, but will likely not expand to connect marginalized populations in unconnected and under-connected geographies because of the high capital and operational costs and low profit potential.


The end of a golden age of discovery?

Exactly six years ago this week I was in Washington DC to collect the Pizzigati Prize for Software in the Public Interest, and award given each year to an individual who has created or led an effort to create an open source software product of significant value to the non-profit sector and movements for social change. While the Prize came in a golden spell for me and my work, I wonder if that golden age of discovery in our wider sector – which I was privileged to be a part of – is now over? When Livingstone, Stanley and Speke set out on their voyages of adventure across Africa, their objective was not only discovery but to show the impossible was possible – that you could penetrate into the heart of Africa – the ‘Dark Continent’ – and live to tell the tale. Although later discoveries and adventures still roused public and press interest (and awards and recognition for the individuals involved) for many that early raw, frontier period was gone, never to return.


No one left behind: Why we need granular data to respond to hotspots in the U.S. and beyond

“Leaving no one behind” — the animating theme of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — is just as relevant to the U.S. as it is to low- and middle-income countries. This is particularly apparent in Flint, Michigan,


Introducing our first ever free book offer!

As part of our ongoing efforts to inspire innovators-to-be the world over, and in celebration of the impending arrival of Spring (!) we’re offering the Amazon Kindle version of The Rise of the Reluctant Innovator free of charge until the end of March, or with a whopping 40% discount on the paperback edition when ordered through the UK publisher’s website.Despite the tens of billions spent each year in international aid, some of the most promising and exciting social innovations and businesses have come about by chance. Many of the people behind them did not consciously set out to solve anything, but they did. Welcome to the world of the reluctant innovator. The Rise of the Reluctant Innovator comes with endorsements from the likes of MIT, National Geographic, the BBC and Nobel Peace Prize-winning Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who also provides the Foreword.


Showcase Your Resilience Innovation with The Rockefeller Foundation

Are you using digital technology to help individuals, families, communities, businesses or governments in Asia adapt to shocks and chronic stresses? If so, we want to hear from you by March 24th. FHI 360 is working with The Rockefeller Foundation, in association with the Global Resilience Partnership, to identify potential digital technology innovations that may have a positive impact on resilience outcomes in Asia. We’re interested in the whole range of digital technologies, from mobile-based communications, to sensor technologies, gaming, big data applications, and beyond. Basically, if it uses any form of digital technology, we’re interested.


Universal Internet Access for the Next Four Billion

Despite remarkable increases in connectivity over the last decade, less than half of the world’s population currently has access to the Internet. For the development community, it is increasingly clear that the digital divide is becoming a development divide that, if left unaddressed, could substantially increase inequities both between and within countries. The vast majority of the unconnected are the urban poor, marginalized groups, and rural communities—precisely the groups the development community is most trying to assist, and those who will risk falling even further behind if left without access. Recognizing the growing importance of access to the Internet as foundational to global socioeconomic development, the international community has begun to focus more attention on the issue, through both new strategic initiatives and ambitious targets such as that of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to achieve universal access by 2020.


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