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Community Survey: Use of Digital Clinical Resources

Digital clinical resources are on- and off-line tools that are used in the context of medical education and/or care delivery with the overarching goal of Read More

Preparing for data revolution: identifying health information competencies among HWs

Background: Health information is required for a variety of purposes at all levels of a health system, and a workforce skilled in collecting, analysing, presenting, and disseminating such information is essential to fulfil these demands.

The 5 Most Effective Educational Technology Interventions in LMICs

There is enormous interest and investment in the potential of educational technology (edtech) to improve the quality of teaching and learning in low and lower-middle income countries. The primary aim of the DfID-funded Educational Technology Topic Guide is to contribute to what we know about the relationship between edtech and educational outcomes. Taking evidence from over 80 studies, the guide addresses the overarching question: What is the evidence that the use of edtech, by teachers or students, impacts teaching and learning practices, or learning outcomes? It also offers recommendations to support advisors to strengthen the design, implementation and evaluation of programmes that use edtech. Educational technology was defined as the use of digital or electronic technologies and materials to support teaching and learning.

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Global challenges of health in the workplace

Over 54% of the world’s population live in urban areas, and over the next decade the growth of cities is expected to be greatest in Africa – the part of the world currently the least covered by workplace health. If we get this right, the potential to improve human wellbeing is vast. Evidence of the effectiveness of workplace health (or ‘wellness’) programmes is often unclear, and in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) the evidence is particularly thin. I have recently been investigating workplace health in LMICs* – desk research and a series of key informant interviews (India, China, South Africa, Brazil and Argentina) – and, while many of the challenges are problems for workplaces everywhere, they are often more acute in lower-income countries. A 2016 survey of 430 organisations found that the top three workplace-health issues globally are all related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs): poor nutrition, physical inactivity and stress.


If You Are Still Collecting Data on Paper, You Are Wasting Everyone’s Time

Way back in 2001, Satellife pioneered the use of PDA’s for health-related data collection in Uganda and Kenya. In the 15 years since, Satellife became the TechLab at FHI 360 and mobile data collection has become routine and easy with Open Data Kit, countless derivatives, and a whole plethora of companies dedicated to delivering seamless mobile data collection as a service. Yet, there are still people advocating for paper-based surveys and projects that actually send out enumerators with questionnaires and clipboards. Why? Here are five reasons why you are wasting everyone’s time if you are still collecting data on paper.


PATH is at SXSW

PATH is headed to SXSW! David Shoultz, the head of our Drug Development Program, will join other panelists from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and John Snow, Inc. to discuss the benefits and challenges of tech solutions in developing regions around the world. While in Austin, a small field team and I will be […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesInnovation is at the heart of SeattlePATH: 40 years of innovation and impactWANTED: idealistic students to save millions of lives ;


Health care’s next revolution: digitized data to transform lives

The call for better global health data has been steadily getting louder. In a recent article, Melinda Gates noted that while the quality and use of these data are improving, significant work remains. Gates cited examples in malaria and family planning where data allowed the global health community to begin solving some of the most intractable […] ; ; ; ;Related StoriesInnovation is at the heart of SeattleIn Davos, Rx for epidemics: tech partnershipsA chance to win at health ;


How to Help Community-Based mHealth Programs Collect High-Quality Data

As health programs are relying more on decentralized models of care, mHealth has made it easier to collect, manage and store community-level health data. This data can feed into national health information systems and be used to inform decision making for improved service delivery at the community level. But how can we ensure that our community-based mHealth programs are collecting accurate, high-quality data that will help us deliver the right services to the right places at the right time? We at MEASURE Evaluation have developed the mobile community based health information system (CBHIS) data quality assessment toolkit to allow programs and projects to rapidly assess the ability of their mobile data systems to collect, manage, and report high-quality community-based data. We recently had the opportunity to present our toolkit for the first time to a group of participants at the MERL Tech Conference.


Register Now to Learn How to Use Mobile Phones for Public Health

In 2016, the number of global mobile subscriptions reached 8.5 billion — more than the number of people on this earth – yet at the same time, health systems around the world are struggling to: Provide access to affordable healthcare for all Treat infectious diseases such as Ebola, HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis Address crippling maternal and child mortality rates in low-income countries Manage non-communicable diseases like heart disease, cancer, and Diabetes Tackle infrastructure and supply chain challenges in remote settings Train frontline health workers to provide care to vulnerable populations Mobile phones are increasingly central to solutions responding to these challenges – are you ready to leverage mHealth innovations in your programs? TechChange is excited to announce its first online certificate course of 2017: Mobile Phones for Public Health. Use code ICTWorks to get a $50 discount on any TechChange course! The four-week Mobile Phones for Public Health course kicks off on February 6th and will feature leading guest experts, case studies, interactive software demos on the latest mHealth topics and developments. We’ve also been working on a new studio set-up to make live recordings all the more engaging


‘One Health’ – A Comprehensive Approach To Preventing Disease, Saving Lives

For as long as people have lived with – and in close proximity to – animals, the benefit of that reality has come with a serious trade-off… the potential for disease. That reality also explains why a “One Health” approach is used at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to identify and minimize the risk from zoonotic diseases, the technical term for diseases that spread between animals and people. One Health is becoming increasingly viewed as a cornerstone to a strong public health effort. That’s one reason November 3 has been designated the first annual “One Health Day,” a day designed to draw attention – and appreciation – to an important, yet sometimes under-recognized approach for protecting health.


Barriers and facilitators to health information exchange in low- and middle-income country…

The exchange and use of health information can help healthcare professionals and policymakers make informed decisions on ways of improving patient and population health.


3 Lessons Learned Deploying eHealth Solutions for Nigerian Health Systems

The Federal Ministry of Health has identified several key challenges for the healthcare system in Nigeria to ensure the availability of life-saving commodities and meet national supply chain reliability goals, including: Incomplete and inadequate data on commodity turnover at Public Health Centers, Late drug and medical supply deliveries to health facilities, Substantial degrees of stockouts in local stores. For example, in 2014, some Kano local stores experienced stockouts (exhaustion of vaccines) of one or more antigens and devices 90% of the time. The stockouts substantially reduced Nigeria’s ability to meet immunization goals and illustrated the challenges facing Nigeria’s healthcare infrastructure. In order to overcome these challenges, the Federal Ministry of Health wanted to have consistently sufficient stocks of vaccines and devices on hand. Additionally, a separate key goal was to have real-time stock data management in order to provide rapid response to shortages.


GHDonline Project Spotlight: ORB & Open Deliver

Join GHDonline this week (July 25-29) for a Project Spotlight on ORB & Open Deliver. Open Deliver is a process for creating, adapting, and delivering digital Read More


Public Health or Politics: The Recent History of America’s Gun Epidemic and What Public…

James Michiel is an American public health technologist and writer. He holds an MPH in Epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health, is currently a Senior mHealth Analyst at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health and also serves as a Senior Technical Consultant for NCDFREE. In this brief essay, he responds to the Orlando tragedy with an examination of the impact of America’s epidemic of gun violence and how we might use Public Health and Policy to change it. On November 14, 2013, the eminently qualified Harvard physician, Dr. Vivek Murthy, was nominated by President Barack Obama to become the 19th United States Surgeon General.


Investments In Digital Health Could Drive Progress Toward Achieving SDGs

Devex: Unlocking the potential of digital health Patricia Mechael, principal and policy lead at HealthEnabled, executive vice president for the Personal Connected Health Alliance, and visiting professor at Princeton University; and Misha Kay, head of the Global Observatory for eHealth “…The recent adoption of the [Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)] marks an important moment in time…More


Blog Post Examines USAID-Supported Efforts To Implement Electronic Medical Records Systems In…

Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks”: How attention to privacy supports continuity of care in Swaziland: Confidential, complete HIV care through better health information systems In a guest post, Sam Wambugu, a senior health informatics specialist at MEASURE Evaluation, discusses his organization’s efforts to implement digital health systems in Swaziland. “MEASURE Evaluation is using…More


Let’s talk about sex: Why the Zika outbreak is really about reproductive rights for Latin…

Sarah Borg is a junior medical doctor trained in Adelaide, Australia with a Master of Public Health from The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She is currently working as an intern in the Reproductive Health and Research department at the World Health Organization in Geneva. For our blog she applies her learnings to the current debate surrounding the spread of the Zika virus in Latin-America.  Health Ministries of Latin American countries have recommended that women avoid pregnancy until 2018 due to the presumed prenatal consequences of Zika virus. This is despite a lack of sexual education in schools, limited contraceptive access, and strict abortion laws. Women attempting to adhere to this health policy are faced with cultural, religious, financial and legal barriers. There are a growing number of Zika virus cases, currently estimated at around 1.5 million, with the majority concentrated in Brazil.


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