eHealth

Featured

Community Survey: Use of Digital Clinical Resources

Digital clinical resources are on- and off-line tools that are used in the context of medical education and/or care delivery with the overarching goal of Read More

Preparing for data revolution: identifying health information competencies among HWs

Background: Health information is required for a variety of purposes at all levels of a health system, and a workforce skilled in collecting, analysing, presenting, and disseminating such information is essential to fulfil these demands.

The 5 Most Effective Educational Technology Interventions in LMICs

There is enormous interest and investment in the potential of educational technology (edtech) to improve the quality of teaching and learning in low and lower-middle income countries. The primary aim of the DfID-funded Educational Technology Topic Guide is to contribute to what we know about the relationship between edtech and educational outcomes. Taking evidence from over 80 studies, the guide addresses the overarching question: What is the evidence that the use of edtech, by teachers or students, impacts teaching and learning practices, or learning outcomes? It also offers recommendations to support advisors to strengthen the design, implementation and evaluation of programmes that use edtech. Educational technology was defined as the use of digital or electronic technologies and materials to support teaching and learning.

Latest

Can the Internet end poverty? Share your thoughts

When was the last time you unfolded a map on your last road trip? Or went to the post office to mail a letter? With a few swipes of your thumbs, you can pay bills, buy and sell stuff, hold conference calls, and talk to your friends and family. Whatever you need, and everything you may not know you need, there’s an app for that. If you’re plugged in, the world is, literally, at your fingertips


The Rise of Mobile Money Services in Somaliland

In 2009, Somaliland’s biggest mobile network operator, Telesom, launched their mobile payment service “ZAAD”, and today more than 10% of the 3.8 million inhabitants are subscribed to the service. As with normal mobile money systems, you can transfer, receive, and deposit money with ZAAD. The mobile money service is used for different purposes such as paying for your groceries, dinner at the restaurant, or your electricity. Other money payment transactions include livestock trade, merchant payments, and bill and salary payments. Recently on a trip to Somaliland I took through the streets Hargeisa, the capital of Somaliland, my Somali colleague and I wanted to purchase some traditional Somali fabric.


‘meHealth’ Interventions Require Customized Designs To Help Reach AIDS-Free Generation

Devex: ‘meHealth’ for HIV in Africa Jesse Coleman, mHealth program manager at Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute and researcher at the University of the Witwatersrand “What in the world is ‘meHealth’? It’s the combination of mHealth and e-health technologies and services to give personalized health support to anyone in the health system … In…More


2016: A year in preview

2015 started off with more than a little degree of uncertainty. Thirteen years ago I launched kiwanja.net not really knowing whether there was really much of a long-term demand for what I had to offer. But it was worth a go. Apart from my years at the helm of FrontlineSMS, where funding often came in multi-year awards, most of my other work has been short-term, and I’ve ended up combining paid work with pro-bono support to grassroots innovators.


Overview of a multi-stakeholder dialogue around Shared Services for Health: the Digital Health…

Background: National level policymaking and implementation includes multiple stakeholders with varied interests and priorities.


Why Do Evaluations of eHealth Programs Fail?

Much has been written about why electronic health (eHealth) initiatives fail. Less attention has been paid to why evaluations of such initiatives fail to deliver the insights expected of them. PLoS Medicine has published three papers offering a “robust” and “scientific” approach to eHealth evaluation. One recommended systematically addressing each part of a “chain of reasoning”, at the centre of which was the program’s goals. Another proposed a quasi-experimental step-wedge design, in which late adopters of eHealth innovations serve as controls for early adopters


Community Survey: Use of Digital Clinical Resources

Digital clinical resources are on- and off-line tools that are used in the context of medical education and/or care delivery with the overarching goal of Read More


Update to Blue Marble Health Collection

This week sees a major update to the PLOS Collection “Blue Marble Health: the mismatch between national wealth and population health” with the addition of 50 new papers, including two new editorials published today in PLOS Medicine and PLOS Neglected … Continue reading » The post Update to Blue Marble Health Collection appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.


A Conversation With: Joseph Tahyor Jr., Ebola Data Manager

Joseph Tahyor Jr. is a desk officer for the organization eHealth. He is based at the Liberia Institute for Biomedical Research, where he manages a database of Ebola patients’ names and test results in collaboration with the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID).


Emerging doctors call for action on global epidemic: non-communicable disease

This week, special guest-bloggers and Australian doctors-in-training, Rebecca Kelly and Tim Martin of the Australian Medical Students’ Association, call for greater focus, discussion and action on the world’s leading causes of death. In March this year, the Australian government released the 2015 Intergenerational report revealing a prediction of the economic and social trends over the next 40 years. There’s some fantastic news; children born in the middle of this century are projected to live greater than 95 years. Importantly, this increase in life expectancy will involve an improved quality of life and Australians will be more prosperous in real terms. However, the report comes with a warning.


Preparing for data revolution: identifying health information competencies among HWs

Background: Health information is required for a variety of purposes at all levels of a health system, and a workforce skilled in collecting, analysing, presenting, and disseminating such information is essential to fulfil these demands.


The 5 Most Effective Educational Technology Interventions in LMICs

There is enormous interest and investment in the potential of educational technology (edtech) to improve the quality of teaching and learning in low and lower-middle income countries. The primary aim of the DfID-funded Educational Technology Topic Guide is to contribute to what we know about the relationship between edtech and educational outcomes. Taking evidence from over 80 studies, the guide addresses the overarching question: What is the evidence that the use of edtech, by teachers or students, impacts teaching and learning practices, or learning outcomes? It also offers recommendations to support advisors to strengthen the design, implementation and evaluation of programmes that use edtech. Educational technology was defined as the use of digital or electronic technologies and materials to support teaching and learning.


Expecting Mothers Among First to Benefit from Cellphone Access in Myanmar

Myanmar was seen as the last frontier in mobile communications until recently when the government


Chiapas Health Workers Improve Maternal Health with mHealth

Rural Chiapas might appear to be an unlikely place for mHealth initiatives to gain traction—with one person in four unable to read, and little cell phone reception or internet connectivity in the mountains, it would seem that accessing understandable information through mobile technology would be a challenge for health workers and patients alike.Yet the community health workers of Compañeros en Salud (CES) have found unexpected ways to make innovations in mobile health technologies work for them and strengthen their programs.CES, a sister branch of Partners in Health, started training frontline health workers in 2012, who in turn began outreach initiatives to treat patients who previously had to travel long distances and pay exorbitant prices to receive care. Women in Chiapas die in childbirth 70% more often than the national average. In the two years since the project’s start, CES has managed to provide affordable care to tens of thousands of patients. This reach is in some part due to their incorporation of mHealth apps (which function offline once downloaded) to better manage their patient information, minimizing the “time-consuming and error-prone process” of using and maintaining paper health records.Within just one year, the team was able to use this technology to collect health information from over 5,000 patients.More recently, CES staff realized they could use these tablets for more than just data collection and efficient record-keeping; they could also use them as tools to educate health workers and their patients.Mobile apps could also be used to train health workers and help them to build new skills such as identifying symptoms and responding to emergencies. Frontline health workers could also use educational images and messages with patients to help explain a condition or help a patient to describe their symptoms.To explore this idea, CES performed a field-test using the Safe Pregnancy and Birth App, a mobile application developed by Hesperian Health Guides in 2011 to provide life-saving information about pre- and post-natal care. The field test was conducted by community health workers, midwives, and clinic staff, who used the app during checkups with patients


« Newer PostsOlder Posts »