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Screenshot 2014-12-19 13.07.43

New IHME Data Visualizations Released w/ 2013 GBD Study

This week, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington released a series of incredible new data visualizations. These tools Read More

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USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children

June 26, 2014 USAID will spend up to $2.9 billion of the agency’s resources to continue the fight for maternal and child health in 24 countries. From VOA: While child deaths have dropped from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012, 16,000 children and 800 mothers are dying every day, says the U.S. […]The post The Daily Impact: USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.

Photo courtesy of Matt Feldman @ inthedistance.net

Mapping Health Facilities in Crises – Reflections and Directions

I am wrapping up my thesis research (finally!), which focuses on the mapping of health facilities in crisis settings. Over the past 3 years, I Read More

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What explains regulatory failure? Analysing the architecture of health care regulation in two…

Regulating health care is a pre-eminent policy challenge in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), particularly those with a strong private health sector.


New IHME Data Visualizations Released w/ 2013 GBD Study

Screenshot 2014-12-19 13.07.43

This week, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington released a series of incredible new data visualizations. These tools Read More


M&E Tech Conference and Deep Dive: Selected Tweets

It’s been two weeks since we closed out the M&E Tech Conference in DC and the Deep Dive in NYC. For those of you who missed it or who want to see a quick summary of what happened, here are some of the best tweets from the sessions. We’re compiling blog posts and related documentation and will be sharing more detailed summaries soon. In the meantime, enjoy a snapshot! Wow


Data Revolution from the Bottom-Up

Data revolutionaries around the world (myself included) are using every forum possible to call for more and better data that is disaggregated, produced more frequently, more open, and more useable. Recently, my colleague Alex Ezeh at the African Population and Health Research Centre wrote me: “We cannot address data system challenges in Tanzania or Nigeria by holding high level meetings in New York or London.” He’s right: The path to more, better, timely, and open data starts with strengthening country governments’ core data collection, analysis, and use, whether it’s routine economic statistics or sustainable development goals. Country action should drive the revolution, bottom-up not top-down.


Gates Foundation Sets Sights On Stopping Spread Of Drug-Resistant Malaria

Seattle Times: Gates Foundation battling big new threat in malaria fight “…With more than $2 billion committed, the [Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation] is the leading private supporter of research into new treatments, vaccines, diagnostic tools, disease mapping, and other weapons to fight malaria. This research should help the foundation press the global community for…More


USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children

USAID logo

June 26, 2014 USAID will spend up to $2.9 billion of the agency’s resources to continue the fight for maternal and child health in 24 countries. From VOA: While child deaths have dropped from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012, 16,000 children and 800 mothers are dying every day, says the U.S. […]The post The Daily Impact: USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Mapping Maternal, Child HIV Transmission Could Bolster Support For Programs, Shah Says

Devex: USAID chief: Put maternal and childhood HIV on the map “The global health community could be ‘under-reporting and under-recognizing’ HIV prevalence as a cause of child death due to a growing gap between child and adult diagnosis and treatment, according to an expert panel who spoke in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. … One possible…More


New Study Maps H7N9 Avian Flu Risk In Asia

New York Times: Mapping the Risk of Bird Flu’s Spread “A strain of bird flu that has infected at least 367 people in mainland China over the past year poses a threat to several other parts of Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, and India, according to a new study mapping the risk posed…More


Publications Examine Funding For HIV, Human Rights

Two publications explore funding for HIV and human rights. Open Society Foundations: HIV and Human Rights: A Mapping of Donor Priorities and Trends in Southern Africa “…This briefing paper reports the findings of a 2012 study on HIV and human rights donor trends in Southern Africa, commissioned by the Open Society Foundations. It identifies opportunities…More


Ebola Deaths Double In Sierra Leone; Experts Use Open-Source Mapping To Track Virus

News outlets report on the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, where the death toll has doubled. Experts discuss open-source mapping as a way to stop the spread of the virus. Agence France-Presse: Sierra Leone doubles Ebola death toll “Sierra Leone doubled its death toll from the highly contagious Ebola virus on Monday, as international aid…More


Satellite Mapping, an important step toward malaria control and elimination in Nigeria

Omede Ogu of Nigeria’s National Malaria Elimination Program (NMEP) reports on efforts to undertake mapping of malaria in the country as a basis for better planning of control and eventual elimination efforts. NMEP has been meeting with the team from the National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA). Progress on pilot malaria mapping in Niger State is being reviewed, though the study is yet to be concluded. NMEP is also looking at opportunities that exist to expand their initial mapping to cover the whole of the country. Discussions are underway on next steps and development of a road map or a framework for the study going forward.


IHP news 271: Missing girls, MERS and Modi

Dear Colleagues,   While I’m putting together this newsletter, most of my department colleagues are enjoying a creative art workshop (annex teambuilding exercise) in Middelheim Park, Antwerp. The weather is great, so I hope they have a lovely time. Yesterday, on the first day of the annual departmental days, we did some strategic brainstorming, as we tend to do at gatherings like this. In a sign of the times, ‘wellbeing at the department’ was a discussion item, for the first time. Have we reached a tipping point?


Towards a Less Wormy World

; By Nina Cromeyer Dieke* Nigeria is – by far – Africa’s most populous nation. It recently came to light that it is the continent’s biggest economy. It also has the highest burden of NTDs in all of Africa. Therefore, when an opportunity arose in late 2013 to run our GIS training course in Abuja, […]


IHP news 266: The IHME report on global health financing

Dear Colleagues, Some of you are on early Easter holidays, so we’ll try to keep this newsletter a bit shorter than usual. Other good reasons for keeping it brief, is that Richard Horton occasionally pops up in my dreams now (which I’d like to avoid), and that I have to pick up my son from a table tennis camp, later this afternoon. In this newsletter we focus, among other issues, on the annual IHME report, ‘Financing Global Health 2013: Transition in an Age of Austerity’. Very nice report, apparently; on Twitter we learnt Chris Murray got a well-deserved “reception like a rock star”, when the report was launched. Unfortunately, the title is just plain wrong (granted, Bono himself gets it wrong on some issues too)


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