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[Comment] Maternal age matters: for a lifetime, or longer

Pregnancies in adolescents (10–19-year-olds) and in older women (≥35 years) are hazardous for the mother and the child. Despite an almost universal decline in the adolescent birth rate since 1990,1 adolescent fertility still accounts for 11% of all births worldwide,2 with 95% of these births occurring in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs).2 In 2014, the average global birth rate among 15–19-year-olds was 49 per 1000 girls (1 in 20), with startling differences in rates between countries (from 1 to 299 per 1000), the highest rates occurring in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Prevention of sexually transmitted infections using mobile devices and ubiquitous computing

Background: Advances in the development of information and communication technologies have facilitated social interrelationships, but also sexual contacts without appropriate preventive measures.

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C-section trends in 21 countries: a secondary analysis of two WHO multicountry surveys

Use of the Robson classification to assess caesarean section trends in 21 countries: a secondary analysis of two WHO multicountry surveys – The Lancet Global Read More

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[Comment] Maternal age matters: for a lifetime, or longer

Image maternalhealth.png

Pregnancies in adolescents (10–19-year-olds) and in older women (≥35 years) are hazardous for the mother and the child. Despite an almost universal decline in the adolescent birth rate since 1990,1 adolescent fertility still accounts for 11% of all births worldwide,2 with 95% of these births occurring in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs).2 In 2014, the average global birth rate among 15–19-year-olds was 49 per 1000 girls (1 in 20), with startling differences in rates between countries (from 1 to 299 per 1000), the highest rates occurring in sub-Saharan Africa.


U.N.’s Ban Calls For Global Commitment To Improve Women, Children’s Health

U.N. News Centre: Ban kicks off meeting to boost commitment to ‘Every Woman, Every Child’ initiative “Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has gathered senior leaders from around the world for a meeting that began [Thursday] in New York on ways to step-up commitments to improve the health of women, children, and adolescents globally under a United Nations…More


Putting Women, Children, Adolescents At Center Of Development Efforts Will Ensure Effectiveness…

Huffington Post: Saving a Generation Within a Generation Flavia Bustreo, World Health Organization assistant director-general for family, women’s and children’s health, and vice chair of the Board of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance “…[The] commitment to make life healthier for future generations is the foundation for the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health. The…More


Nationwide Condom Shortage Affects India’s HIV Prevention Efforts

LiveMint: Shortage of condoms hits govt’s AIDS prevention program “A nationwide shortage of government-supplied condoms has affected two key programs of the health ministry [in India] — human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and family planning. What compounds matters is the size of funds needed to address the shortage…” (Krishnan, 5/12).


FP2020 Provides Framework For Sexual, Reproductive Health Programs, Ensures Continued Progress…

Devex: Built to last: How FP2020 accelerates progress on MDG 5 Suzanne Ehlers, president and CEO of PAI “…Last summer, the FP2020 rights and empowerment working group released a statement of principles that puts human rights at the center of all family planning and reproductive health efforts. The 10 principles provide a framework on which…More


Kenya’s Nurses Educate, Empower Women To Make Decisions About Reproductive Health

IntraHealth International’s “Vital”: Kenya’s Nurses Can Empower Women through Family Planning Peter Abwao, communications and knowledge management officer at IntraHealth International, marks International Nurses’ Day and discusses how nurses in Kenya are being trained to help women make decisions about their reproductive health (5/12).


Cervical Cancer Detection in Zimbabwe: A Scalable Solution

It always inspires us to talk with people like Dr. Lowell Schnipper, an oncologist who is running a cervical cancer detection initiative out of St. Albert’s Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe. The work of this team emphasizes prevention, ultra low-cost methods and an emphasis on building local capacity. Cervical cancer hits women of childbearing age and puts families at risk of losing their mothers.


CSIS Report Examines U.S.-Tanzania Bilateral Cooperation On MCH, Immunization Activities

Center for Strategic & International Studies: Targeting Big Results in Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health “In February 2015, the CSIS Global Health Policy Center led a delegation to Tanzania to examine U.S.-Tanzania bilateral cooperation on maternal, neonatal, and child health and the ways in which U.S.-funded programs complement immunization activities carried out by the government…More


Consensus and contention in the priority setting process: examining the health sector in Uganda

Health priority setting is a critical and contentious issue in low-income countries because of the high burden of disease relative to the limited resource envelope.


Midwives Should Be Placed At Center Of SDGs To Ensure Success Of MNCH Targets

Huffington Post: Midwives For a Better Tomorrow, For Every Woman and Every Child Toyin Saraki, founder-president of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBF Africa) “Celebrated on May 5th each year, the International Day of the Midwife recognises the invaluable role of midwives in health. … As we near the end of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)…More


Prevention of sexually transmitted infections using mobile devices and ubiquitous computing

Image woman-with-phone-300x199.jpeg

Background: Advances in the development of information and communication technologies have facilitated social interrelationships, but also sexual contacts without appropriate preventive measures.


The European Commission needs your input!

The European Commission needs your input through a scoping survey in preparation of a high-level conference and the launch of an inducement prize on maternal and newborn health. Read more about the survey below: Since 1990, significant progress has been achieved in the field of maternal and newborn health (maternal mortality rate has fallen by 45% and child mortality has fallen from 90 to 45 deaths per 1000 live births). Still, we fell short of attaining the Millennium Development Goals that aimed for maternal mortality rate to be reduced by 75% and for child mortality to be reduced to 30 deaths per 1000 live births. What are the reasons of this failure and what needs be done differently? We are seeking your input on these important questions for 2 main reasons: the first is to shape the agenda and content of a conference on maternal and newborn health that will be held in December 2015 in Brussels.


CSIS Video, Event Highlight Family Planning In Senegal

Center for Strategic & International Studies’ “Smart Global Health”: Video and Event Shine Spotlight on Family Planning in Senegal Janet Fleischman, senior associate at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, discusses a new video by CSIS on family planning in Senegal and an April 27 event, titled “Partnerships to Advance Family Planning in Senegal: Lessons…More


Accounting for 1 in 3 Maternal Deaths, Health Disparities Persist in South Asia

By Linnea Bennet, Intern, Environmental Change and Security Program, Wilson Center As part of the Advancing Policy Dialogue on Maternal Health Series, the MHTF, along with UNFPA, supported the Wilson Center to host South Asia Consultation on Maternal Health: Regional Dialogue and Way Forward, to address neglected topics in maternal health. The state of maternal health in South Asia is difficult to assess. Although rates of maternal mortality are declining between 2 and 2.5 percent a year overall, the region’s massive population – one fifth of the world and over 1 billion people in India alone – means it still accounts for one out of three maternal deaths. [Video Below] Quality of care fluctuates wildly. Some countries, like Sri Lanka, have made major improvements while others, like Afghanistan and Pakistan, still struggle to meet baseline needs, said Dr. Linda Bartlett, an associate scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


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