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Ethical concerns with cervical cancer screening trials in India

Recently, the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics published an article by Dr. Eric Suba regarding ethical and scientific controversies about large-scale longitudinal randomized trials of various…

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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →

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Safe drinking water keeps Cambodian kids in school

Children walking to school, Kampong Cham, Cambodia. Karen Murphy If you build it, he will come. In the case of Cambodian schools it is more like: if you provide safe drinking water, kids will go to school. When schools provided treated water in containers, the rate of absence for students dropped.

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The Daily Impact: Acute Malnutrition Risk for 250k Children in South Sudan

April 23, 2014 UNICEF warns that the current crisis in South Sudan is placing 250,000 children at risk of dying from malnutrition, warns UNICEF. From VOA: UNICEF spokesman Christophe Boulieroc told VOA more than 3.7 million people in South Sudan are at high risk of not getting enough to eat.  Among them, he said are 740,000 children under age five.  “This means that if nothing is done to increase, to scale up the action against malnutrition – that means that 50,000 children under five could die unless they benefit from treatment …  But, the violence is really worsening the situation in this regard,” he said. UNICEF staff report many people are resorting to eating wild foods, such as bulbs and grasses. They warn the continuing conflict between the government and rebels is forcing more people to flee their homes. If the violence persists, it notes farmers might miss the planting season, which would increase child malnutrition to heights never seen before.


Delayed Cord Clamping: The vast benefits of doing nothing for a little while

What is one of the first interventions we perform on a normal birth? What is so ‘normal’ that we don’t even think of it as an intervention? Cutting the cord! Dr. Greene is asking questions about this intervention…


Report Examines Family Planning In Ethiopia, Including U.S. Engagement

The Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) has released a report written by Janet Fleischman, senior associate, and Alisha Kramer, program manager at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, titled “Family Planning and Linkages with U.S. Health and Development Goals.” The report, which focuses on a CSIS-led delegation to Ethiopia, “outlines [the country's] health…More


U.N., Gates Foundation Sign MoU On Family Planning

Leadership: U.N., Gates Partner To Boost Family Health In Developing Countries “The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have signed a memorandum of understanding to help increase access to family planning information, contraceptives, and services in developing countries, particularly for young people…” (Oluwarotimi, 4/19).


Ethical concerns with cervical cancer screening trials in India

Indiaflag

Recently, the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics published an article by Dr. Eric Suba regarding ethical and scientific controversies about large-scale longitudinal randomized trials of various…


Not All Imams In Senegal Oppose Family Planning

Citing the publication of a March 15 Washington Post article on controversy surrounding a family planning program and religious leaders in Senegal, Cheikh Seck, the project director for IntraHealth International’s Senegal Urban Health Initiative, and colleagues write in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Impatient Optimists” blog, “[T]he article presents a one-sided and stereotypical view…More


IHP news 267: Happy Easter!

Dear Colleagues, It’s Friday, so my coffee consumption is going through the roof. The Christians among you probably have other things to do this weekend, so we’ll keep this intro short. The atheists, agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and new agers among you will surely not mind. As for the “Socialist” who has his very own religion, global health, maybe this weekend is a good time to chant his planetary manifesto together with his beloved ones.   In this week’s guest editorial, Agnes Nanyonjo ( from the Malaria Consortium Uganda, and also an EV 2012) provides some of her impressions of the 2014 Geneva Health Forum, focusing mostly on day 1 of the three-day conference


Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →


Eighty million years of healthy life and counting

By Kim Longfield, Director of Research, PSI The Global Health & Innovation Conference is the world’s leading global health and social entrepreneurship conference. Held in New Haven, Conn., last week, the tenth edition of the gathering attracted more than 2,000 delegates and speakers from an array of disciplines: global health leaders like Jeffrey Sachs; investigative journalists like Michael Moss; influential bloggers like Seth Godin; and activists, entrepreneurs, academics, students, donors, and implementers. It was the first time I’ve presented at this prestigious conference. The post Eighty million years of healthy life and counting appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Safe drinking water keeps Cambodian kids in school

cambodia flag

Children walking to school, Kampong Cham, Cambodia. Karen Murphy If you build it, he will come. In the case of Cambodian schools it is more like: if you provide safe drinking water, kids will go to school. When schools provided treated water in containers, the rate of absence for students dropped.