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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →

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Safe drinking water keeps Cambodian kids in school

Children walking to school, Kampong Cham, Cambodia. Karen Murphy If you build it, he will come. In the case of Cambodian schools it is more like: if you provide safe drinking water, kids will go to school. When schools provided treated water in containers, the rate of absence for students dropped.

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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.

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Private health care for diarrhea in Africa kills 20,000 kids annually

africa-map-wiki-Author-Hristov

A nurse gives oral rehydration salts to a two-year-old in Sierra Leone. UNICEF Children in sub-Saharan Africa who suffer from diarrhea are receiving lifesaving treatment at a lower rate when visiting private hospitals as compared to public ones. Closing that gap would save an estimated 20,000 lives each year. When a child present signs of … Continue reading →


Eighty million years of healthy life and counting

By Kim Longfield, Director of Research, PSI The Global Health & Innovation Conference is the world’s leading global health and social entrepreneurship conference. Held in New Haven, Conn., last week, the tenth edition of the gathering attracted more than 2,000 delegates and speakers from an array of disciplines: global health leaders like Jeffrey Sachs; investigative journalists like Michael Moss; influential bloggers like Seth Godin; and activists, entrepreneurs, academics, students, donors, and implementers. It was the first time I’ve presented at this prestigious conference. The post Eighty million years of healthy life and counting appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Safe drinking water keeps Cambodian kids in school

cambodia flag

Children walking to school, Kampong Cham, Cambodia. Karen Murphy If you build it, he will come. In the case of Cambodian schools it is more like: if you provide safe drinking water, kids will go to school. When schools provided treated water in containers, the rate of absence for students dropped.


Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.


The Daily Impact: Global Climate Change Efforts are Falling Short

April 14, 2014 A UN panel warned that governments are not doing enough to prevent the risks posed by climate change. From the NY Times: In a report unveiled here, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that decades of foot-dragging by political leaders had propelled humanity into a critical situation, with greenhouse emissions rising faster than ever. Though it remains technically possible to keep planetary warming to a tolerable level, only an intensive push over the next 15 years to bring those emissions under control can achieve the goal, the committee found. “We cannot afford to lose another decade,” said Ottmar Edenhofer, a German economist and co-chairman of the committee that wrote the report.


Unsafe surgery: a question of gender and economics

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By Sarah Kessler, Head of Outreach at Lifebox Foundation, a global health non-governmental organization making surgery safer in low-resource countries.   “So the question,” asked Lesong…


Fistula care in Niger – blog post on anthro dissertation

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Sai Hankuri » dissertating, diversions, and data. Fascinating early data from Ali Heller (doctoral candidate in anthropology @ Washington University in St Louis) on the…


Strength in numbers: Community health workers in social franchise networks

Dr. Aye Aye owns a small, tin roof clinic nestled next to her home in Yangon, Myanmar. There she serves the poor of her community with integrated health services including family planning, tuberculosis screening and treatment, diarrhea treatment, and more. She was one of the first doctors to join the Sun Quality Health Network, PSI/Myanmar’s social franchise network.


IHP news 266: The IHME report on global health financing

Dear Colleagues, Some of you are on early Easter holidays, so we’ll try to keep this newsletter a bit shorter than usual. Other good reasons for keeping it brief, is that Richard Horton occasionally pops up in my dreams now (which I’d like to avoid), and that I have to pick up my son from a table tennis camp, later this afternoon. In this newsletter we focus, among other issues, on the annual IHME report, ‘Financing Global Health 2013: Transition in an Age of Austerity’. Very nice report, apparently; on Twitter we learnt Chris Murray got a well-deserved “reception like a rock star”, when the report was launched. Unfortunately, the title is just plain wrong (granted, Bono himself gets it wrong on some issues too)


Throwback Thursday: Ensuring a Healthy and Safe Delivery

During the Taliban rule – when women were barred from school – the once female-dominated health workforce was depleted, leaving only 467 practicing midwives and one midwifery school for a country of 22 million people. After the fall of the Taliban in 2002, Jhpiego, in partnership with the Afghan government and with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, led the development of a community-based national midwifery education system. The post Throwback Thursday: Ensuring a Healthy and Safe Delivery appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.