Maternal & Reproductive Health

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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.

World map

Unsafe surgery: a question of gender and economics

By Sarah Kessler, Head of Outreach at Lifebox Foundation, a global health non-governmental organization making surgery safer in low-resource countries.   “So the question,” asked Lesong…

World map

Fistula care in Niger – blog post on anthro dissertation

Sai Hankuri » dissertating, diversions, and data. Fascinating early data from Ali Heller (doctoral candidate in anthropology @ Washington University in St Louis) on the…

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Two shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough, says WHO

WHO

New vaccines against the virus which triggers most cervical cancers will protect young girls after two doses, rather than the three in the current schedule, enabling GAVI to reach more in the developing world where most cases occurReaching more girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organisation’s expert advisory group has said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) is going to be sufficiently protective for girls, instead of the three-doses currently recommended, as long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.Three shots of vaccine – either Merck’s Gardasil or GSK’s Cervarix – have been incorporated into immunisation schedules in affluent countries. But there is enough evidence now, according to the WHO’s SAGE committee – strategic advisory group of experts – on immunisation, to rule that two shots will do the job. SAGE reiterated the importance of providing human papillomavirus immunization to girls as early as necessary, i.e.


Unsafe surgery: a question of gender and economics

World map

By Sarah Kessler, Head of Outreach at Lifebox Foundation, a global health non-governmental organization making surgery safer in low-resource countries.   “So the question,” asked Lesong…


Fistula care in Niger – blog post on anthro dissertation

World map

Sai Hankuri » dissertating, diversions, and data. Fascinating early data from Ali Heller (doctoral candidate in anthropology @ Washington University in St Louis) on the…


Introducing the "Yaari", a new method to resolve shoulder dystocia

Shoulder dystocia is form of obstructed labor. Most obstetricians and midwives will tell you that this problem strikes a bit of dread in teams attending a birth. Fortunately there are a series of clever maneuvers that can often help release a newborn’s shoulder from behind the mother’s pubic bone. However, in some cases the maneuvers themselves can be dangerous and in other cases they may not work. Dr.


Infographic: Contraception changes everything

Access to contraception is something we often take for granted in the United States. But 222 million women in the developing world – who have an unmet need for contraception – still can’t get it. How can contraception radically change their worlds? The post Infographic: Contraception changes everything appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


Can Coaching Health Workers Improve the Performance of Health Systems?

Coaching-AP

In Andhra Pradesh, India, we are working with the government and SVS Medical College to pilot a model for on-site coaching: http://cgsd.columbia.edu/2014/03/17/can-coaching-health-workers-improve-the-performance-of-health-systems/


“The emerging face of Africa: women taking the lead in technology, science, and innovation”

She walks, barefooted, mile and miles to find water. She carries babies on her back and both hips. On her head is a basket. Her life is poor, hard, and often violent. Her babies die of diseases due to dirty water


Is a sanitary pad enough?

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In a timely lead-up to International Women’s Day on Saturday, this almost incredible story, about an uneducated South Indian man inventing a low-cost technology to make sanitary pads more widely available to rural women, has been doing the social media rounds.


Anemia– how do you diagnose anemia in pregnant women?

Those who read our blog know that we are very focused on anemia– and for good reason (we think). Despite increasing efforts to diagnose and treat anemia worldwide, anemia affects 28% of the global population. And for the specific populations of greatest interest to the Maternova team, anemia is of tremendous relevance– affecting as much as 42% of pregnant women and 47% of preschool aged children internationally. But did you know that diagnosing anemia in pregnancy requires some additional information and different cutoff points?


The new Rehydration Unit: Adapting ORS training and treatment for the mothers of Fakir Bagan in…

Image Calcutta%20kids.jpg

In the video, the Haitian child was listless: his eyes were sunken and his shriveled body was limp. His mouth curled, turtle-like, to prepare to cry, but no tears came. A gloved hand, arm hairs poking out, reached for the skin around the child’s abdomen. The hand of the clinician pulled gathered skin to form a sinusoid mound. Then, instead of snapping into place as skin normally does, the mound slowly melted back like silly putty