Maternal & Reproductive Health

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FGM and child marriage: grandmothers are part of the problem and the solution

By Fatimah Kelleher | Guardian Development News | Girls on their own can’t change the norms that endanger them. Understand the role of the other women Read More

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USAID on Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality

USAID’s Vision for Action for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality seeks to improve maternal and fetal health at the country-level using holistic and integrated approaches that Read More

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How do “fast-track” countries reduce maternal and child mortality rates?

By Carole Presern: Social and economic development is a mysterious business. In some low- and middle-income countries, economic growth brings very little change to the lives Read More

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More on the river that divides Tajikistan and Afghanistan– and a 50 fold different risk in…

What explains the enormous more than 50 fold difference in maternal mortality rates across this river? Both areas of Tajikistan and Afghanistan are “in geographically contiguous poor, post-conflict, highly conservative, mountainous countries.” How can the obstetric risks for women be so different? To continue our review of this fascinating study, we take a closer look at the differences between the Tajik and Afghan sides of the river as reported in the study by Kylea Liese. The Tajik side has a large Soviet era hospital, some basic equipment and some medical personnel. And the Tajik women have a maternal mortality rate 50 times lower than the Afghan women, who have little to no medical care.


FGM and child marriage: grandmothers are part of the problem and the solution

World map

By Fatimah Kelleher | Guardian Development News | Girls on their own can’t change the norms that endanger them. Understand the role of the other women Read More


USAID on Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality

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USAID’s Vision for Action for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality seeks to improve maternal and fetal health at the country-level using holistic and integrated approaches that Read More


Birth in War: an Ethnographic Study in Afghanistan

“Even on a mountain, there is still a road.” Pashto proverb Why are women just over the border of a small 60 foot river, in Tajikistan, about fifty times less likely to die in childbirth as compared to women in Afghanistan? Words have been spilled generously attempting to describe the difficult terrain (both topological and political) of Afghanistan. Less has been devoted to the deep-boned stubbornness, a defiance, which living in this gnarly terrain has forged in its people. It is stubbornness to outside rulers (whether Alexander the Great or the Soviets), stubbornness with traditions, and stubbornness in both friendships and enmities. Wars have laid waste to a land that was once a geo-economic fixture on the Silk Road and a central post of the Mughal Empire, but stubbornness has allowed a people to survive.


How do “fast-track” countries reduce maternal and child mortality rates?

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By Carole Presern: Social and economic development is a mysterious business. In some low- and middle-income countries, economic growth brings very little change to the lives Read More


USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children

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June 26, 2014 USAID will spend up to $2.9 billion of the agency’s resources to continue the fight for maternal and child health in 24 countries. From VOA: While child deaths have dropped from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012, 16,000 children and 800 mothers are dying every day, says the U.S. […]The post The Daily Impact: USAID launches new commitments to save the lives of mothers and children appeared first on PSI Impact Blog.


A force of nature, changing the odds for women in Sierra Leone

Meet Aisha Khadar, Executive Director of Khadarlis Global and nurse by trade. Khadarlis Global works to provide healthcare and sustainable development in Sierra Leone, a country that is known globally as stricken by war and poverty. But Aisha represents a different face of Sierra Leone—a member of the diaspora connected to an ancestral village and with the well-being of her compatriots at the heart of everything she does We at Maternova were blown away by Aisha’s passion and drive when we met with her last week. Having immigrated to the United States, Aisha returned to Sierra Leone after the civil war and used a Médecins Sans Frontières building in Jimmi (Bo district) to enhance a clinic. The clinic is an example of how a health system is built, or rebuilt from scratch.


How the Millennium Declaration failed women in Africa

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In 2000, the Millennium Declaration identified improving gender equality as one of the keys to global development and poverty reduction. However, global health initiatives have since emphasized those Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) directly related to health, neglecting how gender equality is both a fundamental human right and a vital determinant of health


Hospitals and Maternal Death in Tanzania – Guest Post by Adrienne Strong

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 Adrienne is a PhD candidate in sociocultural anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. She has been traveling to and conducting research in Tanzania since Read More


What works in reducing gender inequality?

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We’ve been having an interesting internal discussion on inequality over the last few weeks, and this contribution from Naila Kabeer jumped out. So I thought I’d nick it for FP2P A gendered analysis of essential services highlights the scale of the inequality challenge but it also offers useful point…


Realities of rape in war

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By John Lotspeich:  “Collateral damage. Two words that change a woman who has been raped into a statistic. Two words that excuse sexual violence as Read More


The State of the World’s Midwives 2014: Investing in Midwives Yields a 16 fold return in the…

A few weeks ago we said that the State of the World’s Mothers was in our view the most important global report around. Well, we didn’t lie, but a tie for ‘most important’ would have to include the State of the World’ Midwives. This report was launched for the first time in 2011, and this second edition, the 2014 report, saw considerable publicity associated with the Triennial International Conference of Midwives in Prague. Since 2011, the report does take note of tangible positive changes that have occurred, including the following: -33 of the 73 countries (45%) report vigorous attempts to improve workforce retention in remote areas; -20 countries (28%) have started to increase recruitment and deployment of midwives; 13 countries (18%) have prepared plans to establish regulatory bodies; -and 14 (20%) have a new code of practice and/or regulatory framework.


Midwives can avert two-thirds of maternal and newborn deaths, says UN

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Midwife training in northern Nigeria. Some 73 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are responsible for 96% of global maternal deaths and more than 90% of newborn deaths. Yet, these same countries are home to only 42% of the world’s health workforce. Increasing the number of midwives could prevent as many as two-thirds of … Continue reading →


Rape, Sexual Violence Targets Women Across the DRC

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BY KOLBASSIA HOUSSAOU, Allafrica.com Rape and other forms of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are not limited to the war zones Read More


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