Tag Archives: ethics

Sensory storytelling: what are artists’ responsibilities when creating immersive digital…

Karen Palmer is a digital filmmaker and storyteller from London who’s doing a dual residence at ThoughtWorks in Manhattan and TED New York to further develop a project called RIOT, described as an ‘emotionally responsive, live-action film with 3D sound.’ The film uses artificial intelligence, machine learning, various biometric readings, and facial recognition to take a person through a personalized journey during dangerous riot. Karen Palmer, the future of immersive filmmaking, Future of Storytelling (FoST)  Karen describes RIOT as ‘bespoke film that reflects your reality.’ As you watch the film, the film is also watching you and adapting to your experience of viewing it. Using a series of biometric readings (the team is experimenting with eye tracking, facial recognition, gait analysis, infrared to capture body temperature, and an emerging technology that tracks heart rate by monitoring the capillaries under a person’s eyes) the film shifts and changes. The biometrics and AI create a “choose your own adventure” type of immersive film experience, except that the choice is made by your body’s reactions to different scenarios. A unique aspect of Karen’s work is that the viewer doesn’t need to wear any type of gear for the experience

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Resources: making ethical choices at work

Alison Green from Ask a Manager shares a personal story about sexual harassment in the workplace. For me, it really highlights the challenges of making good choices in complex situations. [ read more brave ]

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Lessons from the West African Ebola epidemic

Conventional wisdom—and an article in the Journal of Medical Ethics reviewed on this blog two years ago—advise that health research should not be conducted during times of crisis. Yes, such conditions compromise the controlled environments that studies typically require to produce reliable results, but they can also threaten the ethical integrity of research. Without institutional mechanisms to hold them accountable, investigators may cut corners, violate standards of privacy and informed consent, and even endanger participants. Disruption in the normal function of medical services can also apply pressure on individuals unable to access care by traditional means to seek it out by participating in risky research.

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A more ethical form of HIV criminalization

HIV has been criminalized throughout the history of the epidemic, or to be more exact, people living with HIV and their behaviors have been a persistent focus of criminal law. This was undoubtedly due in part to the fact that HIV initially was untreatable and infection (for the vast majority) spelt death. It was terrifying. But it wasn’t just an understandable public health reaction.

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WHO issues ethics guidance to protect rights of TB patients

World TB Day 2017 – Unite efforts to leave no one behind

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The concept of ‘vulnerability’ in research ethics: an in-depth analysis of policies and…

The concept of vulnerability has held a central place in research ethics guidance since its introduction in the United States Belmont Report in 1979.

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You don’t need to be a cosmopolitan to support more migration

New from Dani Rodrik:”how strong a preference must we have for our fellow citizens relative to foreigners to justify the existing level of barriers on international labor mobility? More concretely, let φ stand for the weight in our social welfare function on the utility of domestic citizens relative to the utility of foreigners.When φ=1, we are perfect cosmopolitans and we see no difference between a citizen and a foreigner. When φ→∞, foreigners might starve to death and we wouldn’t care. For the policy in question [allowing the movement of 60 million workers from poor to rich nations] to reduce social welfare in the rich countries, it turns out that φ must be larger than 4.5. Is a welfare premium of 450 percent for fellow citizens excessive

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Could this be the worst fundraising video of the year?

More:  Could this be the worst fundraising video of the year?

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Global health porn: the case of Extreme Doctors

The last few years have seen a growing interest in the ethics of short-term medical missions in the developing world. Global health initiatives and programs in many universities often involve such missions, where medical students or faculty travel to a faraway lands (relatively resource-constrained, with high disease prevalence and fragile health infrastructure) and provide certain medical services, for awhile. These missions certainly enhance the prestige and attractiveness of Western medical institutions and schools of public health, and can improve the CV’s of those who participate in them. But those working in the field know such missions, particularly when embedded in longstanding partnerships, can also do some good. They also know that such missions can raise a number of serious ethical challenges that need to be addressed in advance, carefully thought through and continuously managed.These ethical challenges include: students or doctors practicing beyond their competence; inadequate follow-up care for interventions that are provided, particularly for chronic conditions; disruption of local health systems and patient expectations; lack of correspondence between services provided and local health priorities; cultural clashes between Western views of medical need and local conceptions of health and disease

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Ready to hang up your cape? Take the Sidekick Pledge

Continued:   Ready to hang up your cape? Take the Sidekick Pledge

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Bioethics in China: not wild, but not tame either

Here is a way to turn yourself into a hostage of fortune, in bioethics and elsewhere. It is to vigorously defend something against allegedly unfair accusations, while acknowledging you may not know all the relevant information about what you are defending. That position can, should inconvenient truths come to light, transform you into an advocate of the dubious.Case in point: back in July of this year, Douglas Sipp and Duanqing Pei wrote a comment in Nature entitled Bioethics in China: No Wild East. In it, they defended Chinese research practices (particularly in regard to genomics research involving human embryos) against accusations of being morally cavalier, loosely regulated, and prey to corruption. According to the commentary, Chinese research has been given bad press about its practices that do not match up with regulatory and laboratory reality

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How much of a jerk do you have to be oppose aid?

Angus Deaton wrote a few months ago about “Rethinking Robin Hood” (he was also on EconTalk a couple of days ago).His argument is that a) the poorest in the US are maybe worse off than we think, and b) we should rethink the “cosmopolitan” ethical rule that places an equal weight on foreigners as co-nationals. Of course, he says, we shouldn’t totally disregard foreigners, we just have lower obligations to them, and greater obligations to people in the same nation as us. Which is all fine and everything, but its also a bit of a straw man. The interesting question, if we can agree that we have lower but not zero obligations to foreigners, is *how much* lower are our obligations to them?In one of my favourite ever blog posts (now offline, but summarised on Dani Rodrik’s blog), the anonymous blogger “YouNotSneaky” calculates how much you have to value the welfare of a foreigner in order to oppose immigration (or “How much of a jerk do you have to be to oppose immigration”). The answer is you need to think that our obligation to foreigners is less than 1/20th of our obligation to co-nationals in order to oppose any immigration

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Morals, morale and motivations in data fabrication: Medical research fieldworkers views and…

Publication date: October 2016 Source:Social Science & Medicine, Volume 166 Author(s): Patricia Kingori, René Gerrets Data fabrication, incorrect collection strategies and poor data management, are considered detrimental to high-quality scientific research.

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Sci-Hub and medical practice: an ethical dilemma in Peru

Sci-Hub is a pirate repository of scientific papers launched in 2011, and currently hosts more than 46 million articles. Thousands of people use this repository every day to access information, reaching more than 200 000 daily downloads of scientific articles that they would otherwise have to buy.1

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