Tag Archives: global health

Tom Petty died from a cardiac arrest – what makes this different to a heart attack and heart…

Rolling Stone magazine landed in a spot of bother on Monday after publicising news of rock star Tom Petty’s death prematurely, while others said it was the result of a heart attack rather than a cardiac arrest. Petty unfortunately did subsequently pass away, from a cardiac arrest, but it’s important to note neither a cardiac arrest nor a heart attack is synonymous with death. Albeit infrequently, sufferers of cardiac arrest can be revived and a heart attack is associated with a relatively low risk of dying within 18 months with current treatment in Australia. Both are types of heart disease, as is heart failure.

Posted in Aid, Hub Selects | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

What comes after Hurricane Irma?

Mosquitoes, mostly, and loss of access to healthcare. Me, at UN Dispatch, on the health impact of hurricanes. 

Posted in Aid & Development | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

Global health work: Reflective practice and the joy of letter writing

By Saqib Noor I remember lying in a flimsy hammock, hung between two tall raphia palm trees, swinging gently under a glistening African night sky. I Read More

Posted in Aid & Development, Featured Content, General Global Health, Hub Originals, Noncommunicable Disease, Policy & Systems, Technology | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

Using Magpi for Global Health Research

Although Magpi is now used for many purposes in many sectors, it was born from a need to do global health research and evaluation in the field (did you know the original name of Magpi was “EpiSurveyor” = “epidemiological survey tool”).  So even today, one of the things that we’re most enthusiastic about is when we learn about practitioners and clinicians and researchers using Magpi mobile data collection to advance health science all around the world. Of course, Magpi’s model — allowing users to simply sign up for free at www.magpi.com and start using the software, without any meetings or approval — means that in most cases we don’t know when someone is using the software.  But once in awhile Google helps us find great examples of Magpi use for health purposes, and below are four of our favorites: Assessment of Surgical Needs in Nepal Using Mobile Devices: Mobile Data Collection in a Developing Country Eugenia E.

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Epicentre/ Médecins Sans Frontières Scientific Day 2017: Research and Discussion from the…

Continue reading here:  Epicentre/ Médecins Sans Frontières Scientific Day 2017: Research and Discussion from the…

Posted in Journal Watch, Malaria, Research | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

PLOS Medicine Announces a Call for Research Papers, on the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment…

Guest editors Nicola Low of the University of Bern, Switzerland and Nathalie Broutet of the World Health Organization, along with PLOS Medicine Senior Editor Richard Turner, discuss the rationale for a call for papers on sexually

Posted in Journal Watch | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

The secret, hidden pricetag on your cola bottle

0000-0002-1767-4576The line at the convenience store is three people deep. Standing in front of me is a 40-something man with a bottle of cola and a newspaper. In front of him, a mother paying her utility bill accompanied by her young daughter. The mum and child leave, and the man moves forward to pay. “Two dollars?” I overhear him exclaim with surprise… “I remember when a bottle of cola was one!” As he pays and heads for the door, I too grab a newspaper and cannot help but notice the story on the front cover: the mounting crisis of costs from an obesity epidemic gripping not just the nation, but the planet – the economic and health systems already struggling to keep pace.

Posted in Aid, Diabetes, Hub Selects, Poverty, Social | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

New WHO policy briefs: common drivers and solutions to undernutrition and obesity

0000-0002-1767-4576This week the World Health Organization in Geneva released two new policy briefs focused on the double burden of malnutrition and double-duty actions for nutrition. The global double burden of malnutrition (WHO, 2017) Defined as the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight, obesity or diet-related NCDs, within individuals, households and populations, and across the life-course, the double burden of malnutrition now grips many nations worldwide and presents a challenging new nutrition paradigm for policy makers and public health. This first brief outlines the three scales (individual, household and population) and many determinants of the double burden. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, and action for cost-effective interventions and policies to address the double burden of malnutrition within the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition – and, through this, to contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals of ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG2) and ensuring healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages (SDG3). The three scales at which the double burden of malnutrition can manifest (WHO, 2017) The second complementary, standalone brief introduces and explains the concept of double-duty actions

Posted in Cancer, Cardiovascular, Diabetes, Hub Selects, Publications | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

MSF Scientific Days: An Opportunity to Think Critically and Do Better

Paul Simpson, Deputy Editor of PLOS Medicine, looks forward to the upcoming Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) Scientific Days Conference Those interested in medical humanitarian research may well be heading to London next week

Posted in Journal Watch, Research | Also tagged , | Comments closed

Working in Global Health: Katie Kralievits

Matt Cashore / University of Notre DameDr. Salmaan Keshavjee (from left), Dr. Paul Farmer, Katie Kralievits, and Ophelia Dahl leave the University of Notre Dame following a recent book workshop. I grew up with a close connection to Haiti.

Posted in Aging, Aid, Aid & Development, Ebola, Funding, General Global Health, Poverty, Research, Social | Tagged | Comments closed

Developing local capital markets to fund domestic long-term financing needs

Finance fuels economic growth and development. Yet, it is also clear that traditional funding sources – public finances, development assistance or banks loans – will not be sufficient to finance the Sustainable Development Goals. Both developed and developing countries are turning to capital markets to find new sources of funding and to attract private sector financing, investment and expertise. A key priority for the international development community is to unlock adequate private sector financing so that emerging market countries can meet their financing needs to fund strategic objectives, such as improving infrastructure. We estimate that the amount of infrastructure financing covered by the private sector could be more than doubled, if countries harness the full potential of local capital markets.

Posted in Aid & Development, Financing, Funding, General Global Health, Poverty | Also tagged | Comments closed

Malaria Prevention: Tackling the Gaps in Reaching the Hardest-to-Reach

Estrella Lasry, Tropical Diseases Advisor at Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), describes the challenges of combating malaria in populations isolated by geography or violence. For this year’s World Malaria Day, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has focused

Posted in Journal Watch, Malaria, Violence & Conflict | Also tagged , , , , | Comments closed

Is bigger better? Agriculture edition

One of the more exciting sessions I went to at the recent Centre for the Study of African Economies Conference was on the relationship between agricultural plot size and productivity.  I walked out of the session not sure of the shape of the relationship, but I was sure of the fact that there is a lot of measurement error going on.   And this is measurement error that matters a lot.    

Posted in Aid & Development, General Global Health | Also tagged | Comments closed

Closer than Ever

CAPT Stephanie R. Bialek, MD, MPH, is the Chief of the Parasitic Diseases Branch in CDC’s Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health. Some of the world’s most accomplished disease experts—including several of my colleagues in CDC’s Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM)—are gathering in Geneva this week at the NTD Summit 2017. Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases that cause illness and disability in more than 1.5 billion people worldwide.

Posted in Aid & Development, General Global Health, Infectious Disease, Malaria, Neglected Tropical Diseases, Social | Also tagged | Comments closed