Tag Archives: language

It’s 2017, You Should be Localizing Your ICT4D Solutions Already

Many ICT4D projects have a major strike against them before they even begin: they use international languages instead of local ones. The intended audience not only has to learn a technology that they may not be comfortable with, but they also have to struggle with the language that it uses, which they may read only slowly and poorly, if at all. It is useless to produce a whizbang tool to reach the “next billion”, if it’s in a language that they do not understand. 4 Reasons Why You Should Localize Localization, or L10n, is ensuring that tools work in the local language actually used by your intended audience. That starts with realizing that many people do not use only one language

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A lesson on power and the abstruse (or a love-peeve relationship Part 2)

Duly provoked by yesterday’s assault on IDS’ use of language, John Gaventa responds with a really nice story/rebuttal As ever, we are delighted to see Duncan Green’s interesting and incisive blog on the new IDS Bulletin on Power, Poverty and Inequality. In talking about what he calls his ‘love – peeve’ relationship with IDS, Duncan raises important questions of language in how we discuss power, …

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17 irritating jargon phrases & awesome new sayings we should use instead

Vu Le calls out some questionable yet commonly-used jargon floating around in the nonprofit space and, thankfully, suggests some alternatives. The post 17 irritating jargon phrases & awesome new sayings we should use instead appeared first on WhyDev Blog.

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Choosing the right words in global health and development

Sara Gorman explores the underlying meaning of words & asks, how does our language affect the way we approach global health and development? The post Choosing the right words in global health and development appeared first on WhyDev Blog.

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Language and infant mortality in a large Canadian province

Infant mortality in minority populations of Canada is poorly understood, despite evidence of ethnic inequality in other countries.

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Death to the Developing World

Brendan Rigby highlights the power of language by exploring the World Bank’s latest move and the trouble with defining ‘illiteracy’. The post Death to the Developing World appeared first on WhyDev.

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Health Workers Should Use Appropriate Language, ‘Patient-Centered’ Approach As Part Of…

Devex: Did poor bedside manner cause the rise of multidrug-resistant TB? Gagik Karapetyan, senior technical adviser of infectious diseases at World Vision “…[E]ffective TB programming should include TB-counseling training, and that counseling must happen at every stage of diagnosis and treatment — from cough to cure. … Basic training in such ‘soft skills’ as interpersonal…More

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Slipping through the Cracks: Indigenous Languages and Medical Missions in Guatemala

Over the last several years, through work with community-based health programs and research as a medical anthropologist, I have visited dozens of medical and surgical Read More

Posted in Aid, Aid & Development, Cancer, Delivery, Featured Content, Hub Originals, Noncommunicable Disease, Policy & Systems, Politics, Women & Children | Also tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Language as a Cultural Barrier in ICT4E Deployments

Follow this link: Language as a Cultural Barrier in ICT4E Deployments

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